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Copulative Compounds Formed By Prepositional Interfixes In Persian Language, Nuriddinov Nodir Mr 2020 Tashkent state institute of oriental studies

Copulative Compounds Formed By Prepositional Interfixes In Persian Language, Nuriddinov Nodir Mr

Scientific Bulletin of Namangan State University

Copulative compounds are such compound words that are formed by lexicalization. The components of copulative compounds are equal by semantic. The article also discusses the term "copulative compound" and its studying in scientific works of Russian and Iranian linguists. As well as with examples collected from sources it is carried out structural-semantic analysis of copulative compounds formed by prepositional interfixes.


Inflectional Networks: Graph-Theoretic Tools For Inflectional Typology, Andrea D. Sims 2020 The Ohio State University

Inflectional Networks: Graph-Theoretic Tools For Inflectional Typology, Andrea D. Sims

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

The interpredictability of the inflected forms of lexemes is increasingly important to questions of morphological complexity and typology, but tools to quantify and visualize this aspect of inflectional organization are lacking, inhibiting effective cross-linguistic comparison. In this paper I use metrics from graph theory to describe and compare the organizational structure of inflectional systems. Graph theory offers a well-established toolbox for describing the properties of networks, making it ideal for this purpose. Comparison of nine languages reveals previously unobserved generalizations about the typological space of morphological systems. This is the first paper to apply graph-theoretic tools to the goal of ...


Modeling Morphological Processing In Human Magnetoencephalography, Yohei Oseki, Alec Marantz 2020 Waseda University

Modeling Morphological Processing In Human Magnetoencephalography, Yohei Oseki, Alec Marantz

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

In this paper, we conduct a magnetoencephalography (MEG) lexical decision experiment and computationally model morphological processing in the human brain, especially the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA) in the visual ventral stream. Five neurocomputational models of morphological processing are constructed and evaluated against human neural activities: Character Markov Model and Syllable Markov Model as "amorphous" models without morpheme units, and Morpheme Markov Model, Hidden Markov Model (HMM), and Probabilistic Context-Free Grammar (PCFG) as "morphous" models with morpheme units structured linearly or hierarchically. Our MEG experiment and computational modeling demonstrate that "morphous" models outperformed "amorphous" models, PCFG was most neurologically accurate ...


Multi-Input Strictly Local Functions For Templatic Morphology, Hossep Dolatian, Jonathan Rawski 2020 Stony Brook University

Multi-Input Strictly Local Functions For Templatic Morphology, Hossep Dolatian, Jonathan Rawski

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

This paper presents an automata-theoretic characterization of templatic morphology. We generalize the Input Strictly Local class of functions, which characterize a majority of concatenative morphology, to consider multiple lexical inputs. We show that strictly local asynchronous multi-tape transducers successfully capture this typology of nonconcatenative template filling. This characterization and restriction uniquely opens up representational issues in morphological computation


Modeling The Learning Of The Person Case Constraint, Adam Liter, Naomi H. Feldman 2020 University of Maryland, College Park

Modeling The Learning Of The Person Case Constraint, Adam Liter, Naomi H. Feldman

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

Many domains of linguistic research posit feature bundles as an explanation for various phenomena. Such hypotheses are often evaluated on their simplicity (or parsimony). We take a complementary approach. Specifically, we evaluate different hypotheses about the representation of person features in syntax on the basis of their implications for learning the Person Case Constraint (PCC). The PCC refers to a phenomenon where certain combinations of clitics (pronominal bound morphemes) are disallowed with ditransitive verbs. We compare a simple theory of the PCC, where person features are represented as atomic units, to a feature-based theory of the PCC, where person features ...


Stop The Morphological Cycle, I Want To Get Off: Modeling The Development Of Fusion, Micha Elsner, Martha B. Johnson, Stephanie Antetomaso, Andrea D. Sims 2020 The Ohio State University

Stop The Morphological Cycle, I Want To Get Off: Modeling The Development Of Fusion, Micha Elsner, Martha B. Johnson, Stephanie Antetomaso, Andrea D. Sims

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

Historical linguists observe that many fusional (unsegmentable) morphological structures developed from agglutinative (segmentable) predecessors. Such changes may result when learners fail to acquire a phonological alternation, and instead, “chunk” the altered versions of morphemes and memorize them as underlying representations. We present a Bayesian model of this process, which learns which morphosyntactic properties are chunked together, what their underlying representations are, and what phonological processes apply to them. In simulations using artificial data, we provide quantitative support to two claims about agglutinative and fusional structures: that optional morphological markers discourage fusion from developing, but that stress-based vowel reduction encourages it.


Scoring Morphology In Measures Of Spelling And Written Morphological Awareness: A Scoping Review, Victor A. Lugo, Kimberly A. Murphy, Emily Diehm 2019 Old Dominion University

Scoring Morphology In Measures Of Spelling And Written Morphological Awareness: A Scoping Review, Victor A. Lugo, Kimberly A. Murphy, Emily Diehm

Communication Disorders & Special Education Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Computing Agreement In A Mixed System, Sakshi Bhatia 2019 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Computing Agreement In A Mixed System, Sakshi Bhatia

Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation develops a comprehensive response to the question of how agreement is computed in Hindi-Urdu – a language with a mixed agreement system where the verb can agree with a subject or an object depending on the structural context. This dissertation covers new empirical and theoretical ground in two domains. First, I identify three kinds of atypical agreement patterns which are not accounted for under traditional approaches Hindi-Urdu agreement -- verb agreement with the nominal component of Noun-Verb complex predicates, long distance agreement of embedding Adjective-Verb predicates with embedded infinitive clause objects, and copular agreement in identity copula structures. Second, I ...


Learning Reduplication With A Neural Network Without Explicit Variables, Brandon Prickett, Aaron Traylor, Joe Pater 2019 Brown University

Learning Reduplication With A Neural Network Without Explicit Variables, Brandon Prickett, Aaron Traylor, Joe Pater

Joe Pater

Reduplicative linguistic patterns have been used as evidence for explicit algebraic variables in models of cognition. Here we show that a variable-free neural network can model these patterns in a way that predicts observed human behavior. Specifically, we successfully simulate the three experiments presented by Marcus et al. (1999), as well as Endress et al.’s (2007) partial replication of one of those experiments. We then explore the model’s ability to generalize reduplicative mappings to different kinds of novel inputs. Using Berent’s (2013) scopes of generalization as a metric, we find that the model matches the scope of ...


Derivational Development: Derivational Word Processing In Three English-Speaking Populations, Lisa Suzanne Kemp 2019 Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

Derivational Development: Derivational Word Processing In Three English-Speaking Populations, Lisa Suzanne Kemp

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

Native-English speaking adults use morphological decomposition to understand complex words (e.g. farmer becomes farm-er). Whether decomposition is driven by semantic organization is still unclear. It is also unclear whether ESL adults and elementary age children use the same word processing strategies as native speaking adults. This study tested an identical experimental procedure across three English-speaking populations: native speaking adults, non-native speaking adults and elementary age children. The first task tested how readers use base and suffix information in complex words and nonwords when the word featured only a base word, only a suffix, both a base and a ...


P’Urhépecha Classifier Morphemes, Matthew Ball 2019 Purdue University, West Lafayette

P’Urhépecha Classifier Morphemes, Matthew Ball

The Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research

No abstract provided.


Bozoome: How To Create Your Own Language, Cheyanne Bumgardner 2019 Western Oregon University

Bozoome: How To Create Your Own Language, Cheyanne Bumgardner

Academic Excellence Showcase Proceedings

No abstract provided.


Affix Ordering And Templatic Morphology In Mandan, Ryan Kasak 2019 Yale University

Affix Ordering And Templatic Morphology In Mandan, Ryan Kasak

Linguistics Graduate Dissertations

Mandan [ISO: mhq] is a Siouan language traditionally spoken in northwestern North Dakota on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. The language no longer has any L1 speakers, and fewer than a dozen L2 speakers remain. This dissertation provides a description of the phonological and morphological systems of the language, as well as contextualizes these systems within a formal framework. The data come from an assembled corpus of over five hundred pages of transcribed traditional narratives and twenty hours of recordings of those narratives done in the 1970s, which is supplemented by data from more recent fieldwork done in the early ...


Relationship Between Joint Attention And Language In Multiparous And Uniparous Households, Hannah C. Manis 2019 East Tennessee State University

Relationship Between Joint Attention And Language In Multiparous And Uniparous Households, Hannah C. Manis

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The present study was designed to examine differences in the effect of the number of children in the household (also known as “parity”) on the relationship between initiating joint attention (IJA) and language development. We reasoned that infants who are only children (i.e., in uniparous homes), relative to infants who have one or more siblings (i.e., in multiparous homes), would have more opportunity to engage in IJA, and would, therefore, acquire a larger number of object labels. We tested the hypotheses that: 1) there would be a positive correlation between the number of IJA bids and language overall ...


Enhanced Explicit Vocabulary Learning Compared To Implicit Grammar Learning In Adults, Leah Brainin, Marc Joanisse 2019 Western University

Enhanced Explicit Vocabulary Learning Compared To Implicit Grammar Learning In Adults, Leah Brainin, Marc Joanisse

Western Research Forum

Compared to young children, the language learning process is much more difficult and less successful in adulthood. Little is known about how non-linguistic cognitive processes contribute to these age-dependent differences. We argue that language learning involves both explicit declarative memory processes to learn vocabulary and implicit procedural memory processes to learn grammatical patterns. In this preliminary study, we aimed to quantify the relative contribution of declarative versus procedural learning in adults via an artificial language learning task. Participants ages 18 to 29 heard novel singular and plural words associated with images of common objects. The grammar of the language consisted ...


Distributional Effects Of Gender Contrasts Across Categories, Timothee Mickus, Olivier Bonami, Denis Paperno 2019 ATILF/LORIA, Université de Lorraine

Distributional Effects Of Gender Contrasts Across Categories, Timothee Mickus, Olivier Bonami, Denis Paperno

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

This paper proposes a methodology for comparing grammatical contrasts across categories with the tools of distributional semantics. After outlining why such a comparison is relevant to current theoretical work on gender and other morphosyntactic features, we present intrinsic and extrinsic predictability as instruments for analyzing semantic contrasts between pairs of words. We then apply our method to a dataset of gender pairs of French nouns and adjectives. We find that, while the distributional effect of gender is overall less predictable for nouns than for adjectives, it is heavily influenced by semantic properties of the adjectives.


Final Vowel Devoicing In Blackfoot, Samantha Leigh Prins 2019 The University Of Montana

Final Vowel Devoicing In Blackfoot, Samantha Leigh Prins

Graduate Student Theses, Dissertations, & Professional Papers

This thesis presents a study of final vowel devoicing in Blackfoot, an indigenous language of Montana and Alberta. Previous research on final vowel devoicing in Blackfoot variously suggests word-final, phrase-final, and utterance-final vowel devoicing processes (e.g. Taylor 1965, Bliss & Gick 2009, Frantz 2017), though, the conditioning environment for this phenomenon had not been a research focus prior to this study. The present study investigates intonation units (IUs) as the conditioning domain for final vowel devoicing in Blackfoot.

Final vowel devoicing in Blackfoot is investigated here by examining the common word-final suffixes –wa (3SG.AN) and –yi (4SG) in two ...


22 - “Make Me A Sandwich” - “Poof, You’Re A Sandwich!”: Ditransitive Syntax In The Brain, Haley Shea J. Barfield 2018 University of North Georgia

22 - “Make Me A Sandwich” - “Poof, You’Re A Sandwich!”: Ditransitive Syntax In The Brain, Haley Shea J. Barfield

Georgia Undergraduate Research Conference (GURC)

How does the brain distinguish between sentences with nearly identical structures? Neurolinguists have begun to form a fascinating picture of language in the brain in the decades since the first observation of event-related potentials during language tasks. A deeper understanding of syntactic activity—including pattern recognition, ambiguity resolution, and interpretation of functional constituents during sentence processing—would yield insights beneficial to the fields of language education, brain-computer interface, human-computer interaction, and neurolinguistic programs for language acquisition, speech therapy, and rehabilitation of communicative disorders.

To map the brain’s responses to sentence structures, we will use scalp electroencephalography (EEG) to measure ...


Peaze Up! Adaptation, Innovation, And Variation In German Hip Hop Discourse, Matt Garley 2018 CUNY York College

Peaze Up! Adaptation, Innovation, And Variation In German Hip Hop Discourse, Matt Garley

Publications and Research

In this study, I investigate the stylistic use of various forms of the hip hop leave-taking peace in a 12.5-million-word corpus (2000-2011) of German-language Internet hip hop discussions. The English orthography is compared with a number of hybrid variants including, e.g., , , and . I analyze the distribution of these variants over time by comparison to use of the form in an American hip hop forum. I complement these results with a qualitative analysis of peace and its variants as situated in discourse, drawing a connection between linguistic features, discursive use, and corpus distribution. The discourse of German hip hop ...


The Variable Expression Of Transitive Subject And Possesor In Wayuunaiki (Guajiro), Andres M. Sabogal 2018 Universitiy of New Mexico

The Variable Expression Of Transitive Subject And Possesor In Wayuunaiki (Guajiro), Andres M. Sabogal

Linguistics ETDs

In Wayuunaiki, verbal affixes cross-reference clausal arguments in various ways. Most notably, there are two ways to express transitive subjects, and two ways to express possessors. Much like voice alternatives, the variable expression of subject and possessor impart different perspectives on a situation type, but unlike traditional voice categories, syntactic valence remains equal. This dissertation characterizes these constructions with a specific question in mind: what do these two cross-referencing alternations communicate and what influences their usage? To answer these questions, I consider the linguistic properties observed in the usage of these constructions in narratives (Jusayú 1986, 1994), and informal conversations ...


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