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Words Of Change: How Linguistic Shifts Over The Course Of A Short-Term Exposure Therapy Represent Movement Towards Psychological Health, Zachary A. Kahn 2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Words Of Change: How Linguistic Shifts Over The Course Of A Short-Term Exposure Therapy Represent Movement Towards Psychological Health, Zachary A. Kahn

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Exposure therapy is currently considered the “gold standard” in treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Though exposure therapy has been increasingly used and studied as an intervention for PTSD in recent years, little is known about the mechanisms of change in this type of treatment. The Trauma and Addiction Project at the City College of New York ran a clinical research trial for individuals with co-morbid PTSD and Substance Use Disorders (SUDs). Participants randomized into the experimental group, Concurrent Treatment with Prolonged Exposure (COPE), participated in a twelve-session therapeutic intervention that combined exposure therapy focused on the participant’s primary trauma ...


Cognitive Sociology, Michael W. Raphael 2017 CUNY Graduate Center

Cognitive Sociology, Michael W. Raphael

Publications and Research

Cognitive sociology is the study of the conditions under which meaning is constituted through processes of reification. Cognitive sociology traces its origins to writings in the sociology of knowledge, sociology of culture, cognitive and cultural anthropology, and more recently, work done in cultural sociology and cognitive science. Its central questions revolve around locating these processes of reification since the locus of cognition is highly contentious. Researchers consider how individuality is related to notions of society (structures, institutions, systems, etc.) and notions of culture (cultural forms, cultural structures, sub-cultures, etc.). These questions further explore how these answers depend on learning processes ...


Making Sense Of Making Meaning, The Semiotic Way: Emotional Journey Of A Novice Learner, Papia Bawa 2017 Purdue University

Making Sense Of Making Meaning, The Semiotic Way: Emotional Journey Of A Novice Learner, Papia Bawa

The Qualitative Report

I write this auto-ethnography as homage to my teachers and peers, both in the classroom and in scholarly realms, who inspired me to soar beyond the horizons of self and find meaning within the cosmic consciousness that surrounds us. As a novice learner in an introductory semiotics course, I learned about the process of meaning making. This paper is a product of my learning and understanding of a semiotic worldview. Encouraged by my professor, I delved deeply into the “thinkings” of two semiotic masterminds: Charles Sanders Peirce and Jakob von Uexküll, whose philosophies, ideologies and beliefs helped make sense of ...


Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton 2016 The Univeristy of Western Ontario

Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton

Robert J. Stainton

We revisit a debate initiated some fifteen years ago by Ray Elugardo and Robert Stainton about the domain of arguments. Our main result is that arguments are not exclusively sets of linguistic expressions. Instead, as we put it, some non-linguistic items have ‘logical form’. The crucial examples are arguments, both deductive and inductive, made with unembedded words and phrases.


Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton 2016 The Univeristy of Western Ontario

Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton

Robert J. Stainton

We revisit a debate initiated some fifteen years ago by Ray Elugardo and Robert Stainton about the domain of arguments. Our main result is that arguments are not exclusively sets of linguistic expressions. Instead, as we put it, some non-linguistic items have ‘logical form’. The crucial examples are arguments, both deductive and inductive, made with unembedded words and phrases.


Reduced Structure In Malagasy Headlines, Ileana Paul 2016 The University of Western Ontario

Reduced Structure In Malagasy Headlines, Ileana Paul

Ileana Paul

This paper examines the register associated with headlines in Malagasy. While in many
languages headlines appear to have reduced structure as evidenced by the absence of certain
grammatical markers (determiners, copulas, tense), Malagasy headlines show a change in word
order from VOS to SVO. It is argued that like English, Malagasy headlines involve a truncated
syntactic structure and that the absence of certain functional projections accounts for the change
in word order.


Two Questions About Interpretive Effects, Robert J. Stainton, Christopher Viger 2016 University of Western Ontario

Two Questions About Interpretive Effects, Robert J. Stainton, Christopher Viger

Robert J. Stainton

We discuss central themes in Lepore and Stone's Imagination and Convention. We begin by laying out their view, and then pose both empirical and methodological criticisms.


Frog Jump Plop! Translating And Interpreting The “Frog” Haiku By Matsuo Basho, Nathan Roy 2016 University of Northern Colorado

Frog Jump Plop! Translating And Interpreting The “Frog” Haiku By Matsuo Basho, Nathan Roy

Ursidae: The Undergraduate Research Journal at the University of Northern Colorado

Matsuo Basho’s (1644-1698) “Frog” haiku was originally written in Japanese in the 17th century, and has been translated into English over a hundred times using a multitude of different approaches. This simple poem consists of a mere three lines and six words, and yet each translation is unique; some are vastly different from others. Each translation essentially creates a different poem, which are more like offspring of the poem, rather than a direct rendering of the original. Since we cannot know what the author’s intentions were, as translators, we each have to make choices both in reading the ...


The Effect Of Economic Integration And Political Centralization On Linguistic Diversity - And The New Function And Status Of The English Language In Europe, Demba K. Baldeh 2016 CUNY Hunter College

The Effect Of Economic Integration And Political Centralization On Linguistic Diversity - And The New Function And Status Of The English Language In Europe, Demba K. Baldeh

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

This paper examines the effect of economic integration (EI) and political unity on

linguistic diversity and the new function and status of the English language in

Europe. It shows the current sociolinguistic transformation and the growing use of

English both as strong effects and key indicators of the process.


Recent Semantic Changes For The Term "Digital", Tore Brattli 2016 University of Tromsø

Recent Semantic Changes For The Term "Digital", Tore Brattli

Proceedings from the Document Academy

The term digital originates from the Latin word for finger/counting and has for many years been used to denote discrete signals and information, as opposed to analog. Discrete representation is an important principle, not only in computers, but also for (printed) text, music scores and even our genes. Recently however, the use of the term has increased and the meaning expanded to include almost everything related to information technology, e.g. digital natives and digital addiction. This study investigates the core principles of digital representation and compares this concept with the recent usage, with a focus on Norwegian media ...


If It Looks Like A *Uck: A Provocation On B*D Words, Jodi Kearns, Brian C. O'Connor 2016 University of Akron

If It Looks Like A *Uck: A Provocation On B*D Words, Jodi Kearns, Brian C. O'Connor

Proceedings from the Document Academy

For some decades, we’ve been considering (and using) “b*d” words. Such a large part of the document space is made up of words; it seems necessary, upon occasion, to explore the crooked little paths and messy gutters occupied by some words. We invite your company on such a little exploration now.


Toward Augmented Document: Expressive Function Of Catalog, Caroline Courbieres, Sabine Roux, Benoît Berthou 2016 University of Toulouse (France)

Toward Augmented Document: Expressive Function Of Catalog, Caroline Courbieres, Sabine Roux, Benoît Berthou

Proceedings from the Document Academy

A library catalog constitutes a communicational tool which allows access to a collection of documents. It contributes to the circulation of knowledge by signaling and locating informational objects. This referencing consists in deconstructing/reconstructing documents according to principles of standardization: the actualized document is then decomposed into diverse characteristics. With the development of online public access catalog (OPAC), catalogs diffuse their own content beyond the documentary space that they are supposed to represent. Thus the communicational models specific to the bibliographic catalog must be deepened. If a catalog could appear as a documentary showcase, the possibility to comment on documents ...


Mass/Count Variation: A Mereological, Two-Dimensional Semantics, Peter R. Sutton, Hana Filip 2016 Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany

Mass/Count Variation: A Mereological, Two-Dimensional Semantics, Peter R. Sutton, Hana Filip

Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication

We argue that two types of context are central to grounding the semantics for the mass/count distinction. We combine and develop the accounts of Rothstein (2010) and Landman (2011), which emphasize (non-)overlap at a context. We also adopt some parts of Chierchia’s (2010) account which uses precisifying contexts. We unite these strands in a two-dimensional semantics that covers a wide range of the puzzling variation data in mass/count lexicalization. Most importantly, it predicts where we should expect to find such variation for some classes of nouns but not for others, and also explains why.


The Semantic Role Of Classifiers In Japanese, Yasutada Sudo 2016 University College London, UK

The Semantic Role Of Classifiers In Japanese, Yasutada Sudo

Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication

In obligatory classifier languages like Japanese, numerals cannot directly modify nouns without the help of a classifier. It is standardly considered that this is because nouns in obligatory classifier languages have ‘uncountable denotations’, unlike in non-classifier languages like English, and the function of classifiers is to turn such uncountable denotations into something countable (Chierchia 1998a,b, Krifka 2008, among many others). Contrary to this view, it is argued that what makes Japanese an obligatory classifier language is not the semantics of nouns but the semantics of numerals. Specifically, evidence is presented that numerals in Japanese cannot function as predicates on ...


Classifiers And Plurality: Evidence From A Deictic Classifier Language, Filomena Sandalo, Dimitris Michelioudakis 2016 University of Campinas, Brazil

Classifiers And Plurality: Evidence From A Deictic Classifier Language, Filomena Sandalo, Dimitris Michelioudakis

Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication

This paper investigates the semantic contribution of plural morphology and its interaction with classifiers in Kadiwéu. We show that Kadiwéu, a Waikurúan language spoken in South America, is a classifier language similar to Chinese but classifiers are an obligatory ingredient of all determiner-like elements, such as quantifiers, numerals, and wh-words for arguments. What all elements with classifiers have in common is that they contribute an atomized/individualized interpretation of the NP. Furthermore, this paper revisits the relationship between classifiers and number marking and challenges the common assumption that classifiers and plurals are mutually exclusive.


Counting And Measuring: A Theoretical And Crosslinguistic Account, Susan Rothstein 2016 Bar-Ilan University, Israel

Counting And Measuring: A Theoretical And Crosslinguistic Account, Susan Rothstein

Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication

In this paper, I show that expressions like two glasses of wine are ambiguous between counting and measuring interpretations, and that each interpretation is associated with a different semantic representation. In each interpretation, glasses has a different function. In the counting interpretation, glasses is a relational noun, while in the measure interpretation, glasses is a measure head analogous to litre. This difference leads to a number of grammatical contrasts which can be explained by differences in the grammatical structure. I discuss whether these differences are only semantic or also expressed in the syntactic representation. The assumption that syntax directly reflects ...


Container Constructions In Yudja: Locatives, Individuation And Measure, Suzi Lima 2016 University Of Toronto, Canada/Federal University Of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

Container Constructions In Yudja: Locatives, Individuation And Measure, Suzi Lima

Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication

The possible interpretations of container phrases (such as ‘cups of sugar’) has been long debated in the formal semantics literature because container phrases can be associated with a variety of possible readings that go from individuation to measure. In this paper we explore the interpretation of container phrases in Yudja (Tupi stock, Brazil), a language where container phrases are optional in construction with numerals and are morphosyntactically identical to locative phrases. Based on experimental studies with Yudja children and adults we intend to show that these expressions are ambiguous in at least three ways (locative, individuation and measure) and that ...


Iceberg Semantics For Count Nouns And Mass Nouns: Classifiers, Measures And Portions, Fred Landman 2016 Tel Aviv University, Israel

Iceberg Semantics For Count Nouns And Mass Nouns: Classifiers, Measures And Portions, Fred Landman

Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication

The background for this paper is the framework of Boolean semantics for mass and count nouns, and singular and plural count nouns, as developed from the work of Godehard Link in Link 1983 (see e.g. the expositions in Landman 1991, 2010).

Link-style Boolean semantics for nouns (here called Mountain semantics) analyzes the oppositions mass-count and singular-plural in terms of the notion of atomicity: counting is in terms of singular objects, which are taken to be atoms. Consequently, Link bases his semantics on two separate Boolean domains: a non-atomic mass domain and an atomic count domain. Singular count nouns are ...


Functional Unit Classifiers In (Non)-Classifier Russian, Keren Khrizman 2016 Bar-Ilan University, Israel

Functional Unit Classifiers In (Non)-Classifier Russian, Keren Khrizman

Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication

It has often been argued that functional individuating classifiers and plural count nouns ought to be in complementary distribution (e.g. Borer 2005, Chierchia 2010). This apparently works neatly for Chinese and English. Russian, however, is an interesting case. On the one hand it has count nouns which can be directly modified by numerals. On the other hand it has three classifiers, štuka ‘item’, čelovek ‘person’ and golova ‘head’, which optionally occur in numeral constructions with plural nouns and look very much like functional individuating classifiers (cf. Sussex 1976, Yadroff 1999). I show that a closer look at the data ...


Crime Investigations: The Countability Profile Of A Delinquent Noun, Scott Grimm 2016 University of Rochester, USA

Crime Investigations: The Countability Profile Of A Delinquent Noun, Scott Grimm

Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication

This paper aims to broaden our understanding of countability beyond what is found with concrete nouns, providing a one-word case study of the countable and non-countable uses of the noun crime. I show that the behavior of crime runs counter to a variety of expectations inherited from the literature on countability: its countable use cannot be directly grounded in atomic acts or events, nor is its non- countable use simply equivalent to a plural individual composed of individual crimes, as one might expect on analogy with certain analyses of furniture. Additionally, while crime has a use as a bare plural ...


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