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Grandchildren Of Ottomans Vs. Children Of Atatürk: A Script On Turkey's Emerging Political Identities Towards 2023, İrem Taştan, Ezgi Karanfil 2022 İzmir University of Economics

Grandchildren Of Ottomans Vs. Children Of Atatürk: A Script On Turkey's Emerging Political Identities Towards 2023, İrem Taştan, Ezgi Karanfil

Markets, Globalization & Development Review

The aim of this script is to take the initiative to open an updated discussion of the ways in which the global ideological market is shaping the collective political identities in the context of contemporary Turkey. We craft two seemingly opposing yet deeply connected political identities, namely the "grandchildren of Ottomans" and the "children of Atatürk", to critically explore the future possibilities for Turkey's contested ideological market.


U.S. Fertility Up Slightly, But 8.6 Million Fewer Births Long Term, Kenneth M. Johnson 2022 University of New Hampshire

U.S. Fertility Up Slightly, But 8.6 Million Fewer Births Long Term, Kenneth M. Johnson

The Carsey School of Public Policy at the Scholars' Repository

In this data snapshot, Carsey Senior Demographer Kenneth Johnson reports that National Center for Health Statistics data for 2021 show a slight increase in births, rising 1.5 percent from the 2020 level which was a 40-year low. Even with the uptick, the 3,659,000 births in 2021 were the third fewest in 40 years. There is little to suggest a substantial increase in fertility rates in the short term, though preliminary data suggest that births in the first three months of 2022 were higher than in early 2021 when COVID first impacted births.

Contemporary trends continue a birth ...


Communication With Kin In The Wake Of The Covid-19 Pandemic, Megan N. Reed, Linda Li, Luca Maria Pesando, Lauren E. Harris, Frank F. Furstenberg, Julien O. Teitler 2022 University of Pennsylvania

Communication With Kin In The Wake Of The Covid-19 Pandemic, Megan N. Reed, Linda Li, Luca Maria Pesando, Lauren E. Harris, Frank F. Furstenberg, Julien O. Teitler

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

This study investigates patterns of communication among non-coresident kin in the aftermath of a crisis – the COVID-19 pandemic – focusing on a representative sample of New York City residents from the Poverty Tracker survey. Over half of New Yorkers spoke to their non-coresident family members several times a week during the pandemic and nearly half reported that their communication with non-coresident kin increased since March 2020. Extended kin proved to be important with 27.57% of respondents reporting that they increased communication with at least one extended family member. However, the kin type that New Yorkers were most likely to report ...


Resilience, Accelerated Aging And Persistently Poor Health: Diverse Trajectories Of Health Among The Global Poor, Iliana V. Kohler, Cung Truong Hoang, Vikesh Amin, Jere R. Behrman, Hans-Peter Kohler 2022 University of Pennsylvania

Resilience, Accelerated Aging And Persistently Poor Health: Diverse Trajectories Of Health Among The Global Poor, Iliana V. Kohler, Cung Truong Hoang, Vikesh Amin, Jere R. Behrman, Hans-Peter Kohler

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

Objectives: This study is among the first to document lifecourse trajectories of physical and mental health across adult and older ages (20-70 years) for a poor sub-Saharan African population having faced frequent and sustained adversities.

Methods: The 2006-19 waves of the Malawi Longitudinal Study of Families and Health (MLSFH) were analyzed using group-based trajectory models (GBTM) to identify trajectories of heath (SF12 mental/physical health and BMI) across the lifecourse. Predictors of trajectory membership were estimated using fractional multinomial logits.

Results: Analyses identified three distinct trajectories: (1) good initial mental/physical health that persisted throughout the lifecourse ("resilient aging"); (2 ...


Estimating The Latino Population In New York City, 2020, Laird W. Bergad 2022 Center for Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies

Estimating The Latino Population In New York City, 2020, Laird W. Bergad

Center for Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies

Introduction:

This report compares the population growth of Latinos in New York City using four different sources and finds that the numbers differ dramatically from those published by the Census Bureau.

Methods:

This report uses four data sources: (i) the 2020 Census Redistricting Files; (ii) the American Community Survey (ACS) 1-Year Experimental Data Release; (iii) the ACS 5-Year (2016–2020) Estimates; and (iv) the IPUMS-NHGIS 2016–2020 5-Year Summary File. The American Community Survey PUMS (Public Use Microdata Series) data used for all years was released by the Census Bureau and reorganized for public use by the Minnesota Population Center ...


State Immigration Policy Contexts And Racialized Legal Status Disparities In Healthcare Utilization Among U.S. Agricultural Workers, Rebecca Anna Schut, Courtney Boen 2022 University of Pennsylvania

State Immigration Policy Contexts And Racialized Legal Status Disparities In Healthcare Utilization Among U.S. Agricultural Workers, Rebecca Anna Schut, Courtney Boen

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

Research links restrictive immigration policies to immigrant health and healthcare outcomes. Still, most studies in this area focus on the impacts of single policies in particular years, with few assessing how broader state-level immigration policy contexts impact groups by nativity, race-ethnicity, and legal status. Linking data from the National Agricultural Workers Survey (2005-2012) with information on state immigration policies, we use an intersectional approach to examine the links between state-level immigration policy contexts and healthcare utilization by nativity, race-ethnicity, and legal status. We also assess the associations between two specific types of state immigration policies—those governing immigrant access to ...


Emotional Experiences Of Muslim Americans Regarding The Intolerance Displayed By Non-Muslims, Munder Abderrazzaq 2022 Walden University

Emotional Experiences Of Muslim Americans Regarding The Intolerance Displayed By Non-Muslims, Munder Abderrazzaq

Journal of Social Change

Muslims in the United States report experiencing unequal treatment and racial profiling from non-Muslims. Recent literature (Simon et al., 2018) suggests the need for further research on the intolerance displayed by majority members from the point of view of minority members in the United States. The unwillingness or refusal to respect or tolerate individuals from a different social group or minority groups, who hold beliefs that are contrary to one’s own, is referred to as intolerance. The display of intolerance among members of different cultural and religious backgrounds can hinder the discovery of new information needed to promote positive ...


The Chances Of Dying Young Differ Dramatically Across U.S. States, Nader Mehri, Jennifer Karas Montez 2022 Syracuse University

The Chances Of Dying Young Differ Dramatically Across U.S. States, Nader Mehri, Jennifer Karas Montez

Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion: Population Health Research Brief Series

The chances of dying young differ dramatically across U.S. states. This data slice shows state-level differences in rates of death by ages 30, 50, and 65. Individuals living in Minnesota, California, New York, and Massachusetts have the lowest rates of death by age 65, whereas those living in Southern states, including West Virginia, Mississippi, Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Oklahoma have the highest rates of premature death. If current conditions remain constant in these states, more than 1 in 5 people born in them will not survive to age 65.


Preventive Behaviors Along The Rural-Urban Continuum In Utah During The Covid-19 Pandemic, Jessica D. Ulrich-Schad, Jennifer E. Givens, Mitchell Beacham 2022 Utah State University

Preventive Behaviors Along The Rural-Urban Continuum In Utah During The Covid-19 Pandemic, Jessica D. Ulrich-Schad, Jennifer E. Givens, Mitchell Beacham

Journal of Rural Social Sciences

Rural individuals and places face major vulnerabilities in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic, yet how and why rural residents adopted preventive behaviors as a result is not well understood. Using cross-sectional data from an online panel survey of Utahans along the rural-urban continuum collected in June of 2020, we find that, overall, rural Utahans were less likely than their more urban counterparts to adopt preventive behaviors. Those who perceived less risk, knew someone sick with COVID-19, thought former President Trump was doing a good job handling the pandemic, had false optimism about the pandemic, had less formal education, and belonged ...


Rural-Urban And Within-Rural Differences In Covid-19 Mortality Rates, Yue Sun, Kent Jason G. Cheng, Shannon M. Monnat 2022 Syracuse University

Rural-Urban And Within-Rural Differences In Covid-19 Mortality Rates, Yue Sun, Kent Jason G. Cheng, Shannon M. Monnat

Journal of Rural Social Sciences

Since late-2020, COVID-19 mortality rates have been higher in rural than in urban America, but there has also been substantial within-rural heterogeneity. Using CDC data, we compare COVID-19 mortality rates across the rural-urban continuum as well as within rural counties across different types of labor markets and by metropolitan adjacency. As of October 1, 2021, the cumulative COVID-19 mortality rate was 247.0 per 100,000 population in rural counties compared to 200.7 in urban counties. Higher COVID-19 mortality rates in rural counties are explained by lower average educational attainment and lower median household income. Within rural counties, mortality ...


Space, Place, And Covid-19: Introduction To The Special Issue, Vanessa Parks, Ronald E. Cossman, John J. Green 2022 RAND Corporation

Space, Place, And Covid-19: Introduction To The Special Issue, Vanessa Parks, Ronald E. Cossman, John J. Green

Journal of Rural Social Sciences

The COVID-19 pandemic alerted the U.S. populace to spatial patterns of health outcomes. Trusted sources of information such as the Johns Hopkins University and The New York Times mapped COVID-19 indicators at the county-level, bringing widespread attention to the timing and clustering of case rates, mortality, and vaccine uptake. The severity of the pandemic has motivated the research community to share data and conduct analyses to illuminate and project trends that would be useful for healthcare providers and policy makers in their communities. This special issue of the Journal of Rural Social Sciences explores the roles space and place ...


A Community-Informed Exploration Of Immigrants' Pandemic Experiences With Pronoy Rai, Pronoy Rai 2022 Portland State University

A Community-Informed Exploration Of Immigrants' Pandemic Experiences With Pronoy Rai, Pronoy Rai

PDXPLORES Podcast

During the pandemic, many of the region's frontline workers were, and continue to be, members of immigrant communities. Assistant Professor Pronoy Rai has partnered with members of these communities and community-serving non-profit organizations to gain a better understanding of the immigrant experience of the pandemic and pandemic recovery. A human geographer, Professor Rai's research aims to improve policy and policy outcomes. Rai's work is supported by PSU's Metropolitan Engaged Research Initiative and Community-Engaged Research Academy.

Click on the "Download" button to access the audio transcript.


How Major Risk Factors Influence Mortality Trends In The National Health Interview Survey, Samuel Preston, Yana Vierboom 2022 University of Pennsylvania

How Major Risk Factors Influence Mortality Trends In The National Health Interview Survey, Samuel Preston, Yana Vierboom

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

This paper estimates the contribution of changes in major risk factors to mortality trends in the United States during the period 1997-2015. The risk factors investigated include cigarette smoking, obesity, alcohol consumption, educational attainment, health insurance coverage, and mental distress. It uses National Health Interview Surveys followed into death records to investigate the relationship between mortality and risk factors and to identify changes in the prevalence of the risk factors over the period of observation. All models control for age, sex, and race/ethnicity. It concludes that increases in educational attainment and reductions in smoking prevalence are the most important ...


Change In Subjective Well-Being, Affluence And Trust In State Governments In India, Vani S. Kulkarni, Veena S. Kulkarni, Katsushi Imai, Raghav Gaiha 2022 University of Pennsylvania

Change In Subjective Well-Being, Affluence And Trust In State Governments In India, Vani S. Kulkarni, Veena S. Kulkarni, Katsushi Imai, Raghav Gaiha

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

The present study explores the relationship between trust in state governments and changes in subjective well-being in India, drawing upon the nationally-representative India Human Development Survey (IHDS) panel data for 2005 and 2012. Our econometric results confirm that people’s trust in state governments is positively associated with changes in their subjective well-being in economic aspects. To take into account the endogeneity of people’s trust in the state government, we have used the 2SLS model where the trust is instrumented by (i) whether the winning legislators belonged to the ruling party, and (ii) whether the margin of victory over ...


江門市居家養老研究報告 = A Research Report On Ageing In Place In Jiangmen City, 嶺南大學-五邑大學居家養老聯合研究創新中心 2022 Lingnan University

江門市居家養老研究報告 = A Research Report On Ageing In Place In Jiangmen City, 嶺南大學-五邑大學居家養老聯合研究創新中心

APIAS Research Report 研究報告

本研究旨在瞭解江門市”社區居家養老”的狀況及需求,以便當局制定服務,讓長者能在自己最熟悉的地方養老。

硏究採用「量性研究」(Quantitative research method) 的方法,以問卷收集了482位居住在江門市城市、鄉鎮和農村60歲或以上長者的個人狀況和對居家養老的意見。

硏究發現8成以上長者偏好在家養老及覺得其現在居所環境適合養老,但超過一半長者居所的安全性成疑,這包括居所存在鼠患蟲患、住屋光線不足和缺乏維修等。另外,有大約3成認爲社區設施便利性有待提升。

在社交支持方面,超過8成老年人擁有良好的社交支持網絡,出入醫療場所和在生活上遇到難題時能獲得幫忙;少部分無法尋求任何幫助。值得注意的是,尋求正式機構協助的長者不多。

在財務狀況方面,約6成長者主要收入來源為退休金,另外少於半數老年人依靠兒女資助。有部分受訪者依賴存款,政府補貼和勞動收入。受訪者月收入偏低,以1000~4000元爲主,部分沒有任何收人。被訪者的醫療保險覆蓋率接近9成,約有2成人對承擔醫療費用感到吃力。

參與是次研究的受訪者普遍身體狀況和自理能力良好,7成以上滿意當前生活狀態 (包括居所狀況、社會支持、居家安老安排、社區設施及其生活條件),認爲目前條件能支持他們居家養老。

本研究提出五大建議。第一,雖然目前大部分受訪者滿意當前生活狀態,居家養老服務供給水平仍有改進空間。為應付老年人口急增,政府應加速發展養老業。第二,社區和居家環境需配合長者的身體機能和需要,進行適老化改造,以支持他們在家養老。第三,爲減輕長者醫療費用的負擔,建議政府篩查符合救助標準的長者,提高老年人醫療補貼。第四,為了讓更多老年人能在社區組織中獲得適切的正式服務支持,政府應加大服務購買力度,增加服務名額同時提升服務質素。第五,子女對年長父母的陪伴和依靠是不能缺乏的,但部分子女沒有很好地履行贍養義務。爲增加子女對年老父母的照顧力度,政府應從教育、媒體方面營造社會尊老敬老氛圍。


Were Latinos Undercounted In The 2020 Census? An Assessment Of Latino Demographic Data From 2010 Through 2020, Laird W. Bergad 2022 Center for Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies

Were Latinos Undercounted In The 2020 Census? An Assessment Of Latino Demographic Data From 2010 Through 2020, Laird W. Bergad

Center for Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies

Introduction:

This report examines makes estimates about the Latino Population for 2020—in the United States, Los Angeles, New York City, Miami, and Houston—that differ dramatically from those published by the Census Bureau.

Methods:

This report uses population growth rates calculated from the raw data found in the American Community Survey (ACS) five-year files for each year between 2010 and 2019 and 2015 to 2019 to project ‘assumed’ population totals for 2020. It uses the American Community Survey PUMS (Public Use Microdata Series) data for all years released by the Census Bureau and reorganized for public use by the ...


Growing Racial Diversity In Rural America: Results From The 2020 Census, Kenneth M. Johnson, Daniel Lichter 2022 University of New Hampshire

Growing Racial Diversity In Rural America: Results From The 2020 Census, Kenneth M. Johnson, Daniel Lichter

The Carsey School of Public Policy at the Scholars' Repository

In this brief, authors Kenneth Johnson and Daniel Lichter report that although population declines were widespread between 2010 and 2020, rural America became more racially and ethnically diverse. In part, the recent uptick in racial diversity in rural America is a consequence of White population decline.

Rural America remains predominately non-Hispanic White with 35 million White residents constituting 76 percent of the rural population according to the 2020 Census. This represents a decline from 79.8 percent in 2010. The number of rural residents who are members of a racial or ethnic minority increased to 11 million between 2010 and ...


Does Schooling Improve Cognitive Abilities At Older Ages: Causal Evidence From Nonparametric Bounds, Vikesh Amin, Jere R. Behrman, Jason M. Fletcher, Carlos A. Flores, Alfonso Flores-Lagunes, Hans-Peter Kohler 2022 Central Michigan University

Does Schooling Improve Cognitive Abilities At Older Ages: Causal Evidence From Nonparametric Bounds, Vikesh Amin, Jere R. Behrman, Jason M. Fletcher, Carlos A. Flores, Alfonso Flores-Lagunes, Hans-Peter Kohler

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

We revisit the much-investigated relationship between schooling and health, focusing on cognitive abilities at older ages using the Harmonized Cognition Assessment Protocol in the Health & Retirement Study. To address endogeneity concerns, we employ a nonparametric partial identification approach that provides bounds on the population average treatment effect using a monotone instrumental variable together with relatively weak monotonicity assumptions on treatment selection and response. The bounds indicate potentially large effects of increasing schooling from primary to secondary but are also consistent with small and null effects. We find evidence for a causal effect of increasing schooling from secondary to tertiary on ...


Marriage Change And Fertility Decline In Sub-Saharan Africa, 1991-2019, Monica J. Grant, Hans-Peter Kohler 2022 University of Wisconsin-Madison

Marriage Change And Fertility Decline In Sub-Saharan Africa, 1991-2019, Monica J. Grant, Hans-Peter Kohler

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

The institutions of marriage and the family have undergone profound changes over recent decades in sub-Saharan Africa, following differentiated paths across and within countries. These changes, however, have not been systematically related to variation in fertility and its decline over time. We use Demographic and Health Survey data from 29 countries in sub-Saharan Africa to examine how nuptiality patterns have changed over the period 1991-2019, and how these changes are associated with changes in the total fertility rate and ideal family size. Using multi-level linear models, we find that our four marriage indicators are all significantly associated with the total ...


Change In Subjective Well-Being, Affluence And Trust In Judiciary In India, Vani S. Kulkarni, Veena S. Kulkarni, Katsushi S. Imai, Raghav Gaiha 2022 University of Pennsylvania

Change In Subjective Well-Being, Affluence And Trust In Judiciary In India, Vani S. Kulkarni, Veena S. Kulkarni, Katsushi S. Imai, Raghav Gaiha

Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)

The present study tests the hypothesis that trust in the lower judiciary in India - comprising High Courts at the state level and District Courts at the lower level - is associated with improvement in subjective economic well-being. The analysis is based on the India Human Development Survey (IHDS) 1 and 2 in 2005 and 2012, a large nationally representative household panel dataset. Using 2SLS and Lewbel IV models to take into account the endogeneity of trust in the lower judiciary, our analysis confirms that trust in the lower judiciary has a positive association with the change in SWB. The policy significance ...


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