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An Exegesis Of The Meaning Of Dobbs: Despotism, Servitude, & Forced Birth, Athena D. Mutua Feb 2024

An Exegesis Of The Meaning Of Dobbs: Despotism, Servitude, & Forced Birth, Athena D. Mutua

Journal Articles

The Dobbs decision has been leaked. Gathered outside of New York City's St. Patrick's Old Cathedral, pro-choice protesters chant: "Not the church, not the state, the people must decide their fate."

A white man wearing a New York Fire Department sweatshirt and standing on the front steps responds: "l am the people, l am the people, l am the people, the people have decided, the court has decided, you lose . . . . You have no choice. Not your body, not your choice, your body is mine and you're having my baby."

Despicable but not unexpected,³ this man's comments …


Antitrust Statements Of Interest, Christine P. Bartholomew Jan 2024

Antitrust Statements Of Interest, Christine P. Bartholomew

Journal Articles

28 U.S.C. § 517 allows the Department of Justice (DOJ) to file a statement addressing a governmental interest in any pending suit. This procedural tool laid dormant for decades, utilized sparingly in litigation involving foreign sovereigns. In the 1960s, the government expanded its use to aid in developing civil rights. In 2009, the DOJ deployed Section 517 in a new arena: antitrust. Since then, each administration has followed suit. Though initially criticized, these statements now draw praise from antitrust scholars as a cost effective means for DOJ advocacy. This Article challenges these accolades. Its foundation is an analytical assessment of …


Judicial Fidelity, Caprice L. Roberts Jan 2024

Judicial Fidelity, Caprice L. Roberts

Journal Articles

Judicial critics abound. Some say the rule of law is dead across all three branches of government. Four are dead if you count the media as the fourth estate. All are in trouble, even if one approves of each branch’s headlines, but none of them are dead. Not yet.

Pundits and scholars see the latest term of the Supreme Court as clear evidence of partisan politics and unbridled power. They decry an upheaval of laws and norms demonstrating the dire situation across the federal judiciary. Democracy is not dead even when the Court issues opinions that overturn precedent, upends longstanding …


A New Addition To The Trademark Litigator's Tool Kit: A Neuroscientific Index Of Mark Similarity, Mark Bartholomew, Zhihao Zhang, Ming Hsu, Andrew S. Kayser, Femke Van Horen Dec 2023

A New Addition To The Trademark Litigator's Tool Kit: A Neuroscientific Index Of Mark Similarity, Mark Bartholomew, Zhihao Zhang, Ming Hsu, Andrew S. Kayser, Femke Van Horen

Journal Articles

With trademark law always striving to keep abreast of new developments in science and technology, the authors of this article propose an innovative, neuroscience-based approach to answering the time-honored question of whether likelihood of consumer confusion exists in a particular dispute.


Dividing The Body Politic, James A. Gardner Dec 2023

Dividing The Body Politic, James A. Gardner

Journal Articles

It has long been assumed in large, modern, democratic states that the successful practice of democratic politics requires some kind of internal division of the polity into subunits. In the United States, the appropriate methods and justifications for doing so have long been deeply and inconclusively contested. One reason for the intractability of these disputes is that American practices of political self-division are rooted in, and have been largely carried forward from, premodern practices that rested originally on overtly illiberal assumptions and justifications that are difficult or impossible to square with contemporary commitments to philosophical liberalism.

The possibility of sorting …


The New Comity Abstention, John Harland Giammatteo Dec 2023

The New Comity Abstention, John Harland Giammatteo

Journal Articles

In the past ten years, lower federal courts have quietly but regularly abstained from hearing federal claims challenging state court procedures, citing concerns of comity and federalism. Federal courts have dismissed a broad range of substantive challenges tasked to them by Congress, including under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Indian Child Welfare Act, and various constitutional provisions, involving state court eviction proceedings, foster care determinations, bail and criminal justice policies, COVID-era safety practices, and other instances where state courts determine state policy.

This paper is the first to argue that these decisions constitute a new abstention doctrine, unmoored from …


Historical Kinship And Categorical Mischief: The Use And Misuse Of Doctrinal Borrowing In Intellectual Property Law, Mark Bartholomew, John Tehranian Nov 2023

Historical Kinship And Categorical Mischief: The Use And Misuse Of Doctrinal Borrowing In Intellectual Property Law, Mark Bartholomew, John Tehranian

Journal Articles

Analogies are ubiquitous in legal reasoning, and, in copyright jurisprudence, courts frequently turn to patent law for guidance. From introducing doctrines meant to regulate online intermediaries to evaluating the constitutionality of resurrecting copyrights to works from the public domain, judges turn to patent law analogies to lend ballast to their decisions. At other times, however, patent analogies with copyright law are quickly discarded and differences between the two regimes highlighted. Why? In examining the transplantation of doctrinal frameworks from one intellectual property field to another, this Article assesses the circumstances in which courts engage in doctrinal borrowing, discerns their rationale …


Mother Drone, Mother Nature: The Griffon Vulture And Israel’S Military, Irus Braverman Oct 2023

Mother Drone, Mother Nature: The Griffon Vulture And Israel’S Military, Irus Braverman

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Reflections On Critical Race Theory In A Time Of Backlash, Athena D. Mutua Sep 2023

Reflections On Critical Race Theory In A Time Of Backlash, Athena D. Mutua

Journal Articles

Reviewing my article on critical race theory (CRT), written over fifteen years ago, this Article revisits CRT and its fortunes in this moment of backlash. CRT has become a principal target for erasure in a raging polit- ical campaign that seeks to suppress discussions about racial and gender justice. It does so, in part, by using law to compel the miseducation of the American populace, including its children. The campaign suggests, in the case of race, that efforts to promote racial justice, combat racism, and employ race as an analytical lens—antiracism—is racist. That is, the right- wing argument has shifted …


Appraisal Discrimination: Five Lessons For Litigators, Heather R. Abraham Aug 2023

Appraisal Discrimination: Five Lessons For Litigators, Heather R. Abraham

Journal Articles

Appraisal discrimination not only persists, but its influence has actually increased in some housing markets. New studies document how contemporary appraisal methods operate as systemic racism, such as how appraisers select from a narrower set of comparable properties when appraising homes in predominantly Black neighborhoods. Recent events have renewed public attention to appraisal discrimination, from shocking news stories to a new multiagency federal task force. In tandem, a new wave of litigation has emerged. This Article examines litigation as one element of a multifaceted approach to combatting appraisal discrimination. After examining the weaknesses of the regulatory framework governing appraisals, this …


Teaching Administrative Law Research: Preparing Law Students For Regulatory Practice, Susan Azyndar Aug 2023

Teaching Administrative Law Research: Preparing Law Students For Regulatory Practice, Susan Azyndar

Journal Articles

A quick skim of daily headlines shows the breadth of regulatory law, from recommendations to limit the F.B.I’s use of warrantless surveillance to how the Consumer Product Safety Commission defines e-bikes. Many lawyers practice exclusively in regulatory settings, confronting these new developments continuously, and even lawyers who focus on less regulation-centric areas will still encounter administrative law. Law students, therefore, need to develop skills particular to practicing in this legal environment.


Genteel Culture, Legal Education, And Constitutional Controversy In Early Virginia, Matthew J. Steilen Aug 2023

Genteel Culture, Legal Education, And Constitutional Controversy In Early Virginia, Matthew J. Steilen

Journal Articles

This article focuses on the movement to reform legal education in early national Virginia, offering a fresh perspective by examining the connection between legal education and society and culture. It challenges the notion that constitutional ideas were the primary driving force behind reforms and argues that social status and “manners” played a more significant role. Wealthy elites in Virginia associated manners with education, sending their sons to college to become gentlemen, as it secured their aspirations to gentility and their influence over society and politics. Reformers sought to capitalize on this connection by educating a generation of university-trained, genteel lawyers …


On Three Arguments Against Metaphysical Libertarianism, Ken Levy Jun 2023

On Three Arguments Against Metaphysical Libertarianism, Ken Levy

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Decolonizing Legal Influence: China's Role In The Changing Landscape Of The Ethiopian Legal Profession, 2000-2018, Mekkonen Firew Ayano Mar 2023

Decolonizing Legal Influence: China's Role In The Changing Landscape Of The Ethiopian Legal Profession, 2000-2018, Mekkonen Firew Ayano

Journal Articles

Over the last two decades, the legal profession in Ethiopia has changed fundamentally. The government has increased the number of law schools from one in 1993 to more than three dozen by 2021. It has introduced strict licensure rules to formalize and regulate legal services and, more recently, in 2022, it has proclaimed the creation of law firms and an independent bar association. The market for legal services has expanded, allowing lawyers to reach out to clients in the country’s peripheries and move onward to attract global clients. These changes are inextricably tied to global currents that have diffused Anglo-American …


Daca's Tax Benefits Highlight The Need For Broader Immigration Reform, Jacqueline Lainez Flanagan Mar 2023

Daca's Tax Benefits Highlight The Need For Broader Immigration Reform, Jacqueline Lainez Flanagan

Journal Articles

America’s aging population and declining birth rates are negatively affecting the nation’s Social Security and Medicare safety nets, reducing tax revenue, and weakening the broader economy.1 Meanwhile, immigration is increasing workforce participation by expanding the number of young adults in the United States.2 Despite political setbacks, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program exemplifies the economic and tax benefits of immigration, providing data and the impetus for a better way forward. Although not all DACA-eligible youth have registered for it, it is estimated that in 2017 alone, more than $2.2 billion in federal taxes were paid by DACA-eligible youth …


Conflict Of Laws? Tensions Between Antitrust And Labor Law, Matthew Dimick Mar 2023

Conflict Of Laws? Tensions Between Antitrust And Labor Law, Matthew Dimick

Journal Articles

Not long ago, economists denied the existence of monopsony in labor markets. Today, scholars are talking about using antitrust law to counter employer wage-setting power. While concerns about inequality, stagnant wages, and excessive firm power are certainly to be welcomed, this sudden about-face in theory, evidence, and policy runs the risk of overlooking some important concerns. The purpose of this Essay is to address these concerns and, more critically, to discuss some tensions between antitrust and labor law, a more traditional method for regulating labor markets. Part I addresses a question raised in the very recent literature, about why antitrust …


From Scanner To Court: A Neuroscientifically Informed “Reasonable Person” Test Of Trademark Infringement, Zhihao Zhang, Maxwell Good, Vera Kulikov, Femke Van Horen, Mark Bartholomew, Andrew S. Kayser, Ming Hsu Feb 2023

From Scanner To Court: A Neuroscientifically Informed “Reasonable Person” Test Of Trademark Infringement, Zhihao Zhang, Maxwell Good, Vera Kulikov, Femke Van Horen, Mark Bartholomew, Andrew S. Kayser, Ming Hsu

Journal Articles

Many legal decisions center on the thoughts or perceptions of some idealized group of individuals, referred to variously as the “average person,” “the typical consumer,” or the “reasonable person.” Substantial concerns exist, however, regarding the subjectivity and vulnerability to biases inherent in conventional means of assessing such responses, particularly the use of self-report evidence. Here, we addressed these concerns by complementing self-report evidence with neural data to inform the mental representations in question. Using an example from intellectual property law, we demonstrate that it is possible to construct a parsimonious neural index of visual similarity that can inform the reasonable …


Continued Conflation Confusion In Louisiana Negligence Cases: Duty And Breach, Thomas C. Galligan Jr. Feb 2023

Continued Conflation Confusion In Louisiana Negligence Cases: Duty And Breach, Thomas C. Galligan Jr.

Journal Articles

Negligence has five elements: duty, breach, cause-in-fact, scope of risk, and damages. Logic dictates that courts, lawyers, scholars, and law students should keep them separate. But they consistently fail to do so. Courts continue to conflate or collapse elements; they combine duty and scope of risk and they combine duty and breach. In combining duty and breach courts purport to determine duty based on the facts of the particular case but, in fact, they are really deciding a question of breach-whether the defendant exercised the care of a reasonable person under the circumstances. In conflating duty and breach courts are …


The Scope Of Generic Choice Of Law Clauses, Tanya J. Monestier Feb 2023

The Scope Of Generic Choice Of Law Clauses, Tanya J. Monestier

Journal Articles

Non-proceduralists have the perception that questions of jurisdiction or choice of law are just preliminary issues that need to be dealt with before getting to the real dispute, the things that matter. What they do not realize is that these preliminary issues are often, themselves, the real dispute. They are the lever which permits litigation to proceed or which stops a claim dead in its tracks. Thus, these procedural matters — often dismissed as technicalities — have the potential to shape the dispute in significant ways.

Take for instance, a staple of commercial and consumer contracting: the ubiquitous choice of …


Nonobvious Design, Mark Bartholomew Jan 2023

Nonobvious Design, Mark Bartholomew

Journal Articles

To earn patent protection, a claimed product design must be “nonobvious.” Yet while nonobviousness has been described as “the heart” and “cornerstone” of the utility patent system, in the design patent context, the term has become next to useless. Instead of actually policing nonobviousness in design, modern courts grant patent rights to any work that is not an exact replica of another. The problem, judges maintain, is that comparing one visual design against another demands the use of aesthetic judgment and aesthetic judgment is an instinctual, subjective process incapable of legal definition. Recent neuroscientific studies of aesthetic judgment dispel some …


Through A Lens Of Genocide: A Different Approach For Hate Crimes Legislation, Bruce Ching Jan 2023

Through A Lens Of Genocide: A Different Approach For Hate Crimes Legislation, Bruce Ching

Journal Articles

Hate crimes perpetrators select their victims based on the victims’ identity groups. Policies underlying legislation against hate crimes recognize that such crimes inflict greater harm on society than do the same actions committed for non-biased motives. Genocide may be conceptualized as hate crimes writ large; conversely, a new model of hate crimes legislation might be patterned on legal concepts of genocide scaled down to state or local levels. This new recognition could successfully address criticisms from both liberal and conservative factions along the political spectrum, offering a model that state and local governments could invoke for dealing with bias-motivated incidents …


Understanding Bias In Civil Procedure: Towards An Empirical Analysis Of Procedural Rule-Making's Role In Continuing Inequality, Masai Mcdougall Jan 2023

Understanding Bias In Civil Procedure: Towards An Empirical Analysis Of Procedural Rule-Making's Role In Continuing Inequality, Masai Mcdougall

Journal Articles

This Article uses the history of procedural rules governing “freedom suits” to elucidate the collection of rights that constitute the Western idea of “individual liberty,” and to make a prima facie case that our current Rules of Civil Procedure are biased against the enforcement of those rights by American minorities. This history reveals a systemic inequality in procedural rights that both pre-dates race and favors the consolidation of economic and political power over the enjoyment of the rights that supply the foundation for classical liberalism. I argue that collecting demographic data on litigants’ interaction with our Rules of Civil Procedure …


The Scarlet Letter "E": How Tenancy Screening Policies Exacerbate Housing Inequity For Evicted Black Women, Yvette N.A. Pappoe Jan 2023

The Scarlet Letter "E": How Tenancy Screening Policies Exacerbate Housing Inequity For Evicted Black Women, Yvette N.A. Pappoe

Journal Articles

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in an unprecedented health and economic crisis in the United States. In addition to more than nine hundred thousand deaths in the United States and counting, another kind of crisis emerged from the pandemic: an eviction crisis. In August 2020, an estimated thirty to forty million people in America were at risk of facing eviction by the end of the year. Black women renters faced a higher risk of losing their homes than other groups. At the onset of the pandemic, the federal government implemented eviction moratoria to prevent the evictions of tenants who were unable …


Rotting Under The Bridge - How False Data Is Polluting Administrative Rulemaking, Nicholas Bryner, Victor B. Flatt Jan 2023

Rotting Under The Bridge - How False Data Is Polluting Administrative Rulemaking, Nicholas Bryner, Victor B. Flatt

Journal Articles

In response to legislative gridlock, Presidents have increasingly relied on policy made by administrative action, leading to major swings occurring when the political party of the presidency changes. These policy disputes have spilled into the third branch with a concomitant increase in legal challenges seeking judicial review of such actions. At the same time, since the 1980s, both Republican and Democratic administrations have made cost-benefit analysis the currency of federal rulemaking in the executive branch.

The combination of cost-benefit analysis requirements and increased litigation over rulemaking has increased the importance of economic and scientific justifications in both the original promulgation …


Seeking Consent And The Law Of Sexual Assault, Lisa Avalos Jan 2023

Seeking Consent And The Law Of Sexual Assault, Lisa Avalos

Journal Articles

This article focuses on two neglected aspects of rape law. First, its tendency to presume sexual consent across a range of social contexts, overlooking the fact that much social life is predicated on a presumption against sexual contact. Second, its tendency to ignore a critical empirical fact: that an overwhelmingly large number of sexual assaults occur during the first-ever sexual contact between the specific parties involved—what I term “First Encounters.” The relationship between these two facets of rape law is crucial. Whereas much of social life operates with an underlying presumption that people have not consented to sex with others …


Sieracki Lives: A Portrait Of The Interplay Between Legislation And The Judicially Created General Maritime Law, Thomas C. Galligan Jr. Jan 2023

Sieracki Lives: A Portrait Of The Interplay Between Legislation And The Judicially Created General Maritime Law, Thomas C. Galligan Jr.

Journal Articles

In American maritime law, the interplay between the courts and Congress is complex and iterative. A significant body of American admiralty law, the general maritime law, has been judicially created and developed. But Congress has also enacted a number of important statutes governing maritime commerce and the rights of maritime workers, such as the Longshore and Harbor Worker’s Compensation Act (“LHWCA”). The back and forth between the courts and Congress in interpreting those statutes and gauging their impact on and consistency with the general maritime law is ongoing. One important area where the courts development of the general maritime law …


Asian American Allyship, Victor C. Romero Jan 2023

Asian American Allyship, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

George Floyd's tragic death not only sparked numerous nationwide protests decrying the continued violence against Black people, but also resurrected conversations around the complicity of Asian Americans in Black oppression. Just as officer Tou Thao, a Hmong American, stood idly by while a white officer stepped on Floyd's neck, many Asian Americans have taken positions that run contrary to policies that foster inclusion, or what may be termed "integrative egalitarianism" -- the idea that "governmental programs . . . designed to overcome arbitrary inequalities stemming from accidents of birth are a worthwhile investment in society's future."

Using the Floyd-Thao narrative …


Stalling A Norm's Trajectory?: Revisiting U.N. Security Council Resolution 1973 On Libya And Its Ramifications For The Principle Of The Responsibility To Protect, Tiyanjana Maluwa Jan 2023

Stalling A Norm's Trajectory?: Revisiting U.N. Security Council Resolution 1973 On Libya And Its Ramifications For The Principle Of The Responsibility To Protect, Tiyanjana Maluwa

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Promoting Female Sporting Opportunities Without Title Ix: The Spanish Experience, Stephen Ross, Maria Josefa Garcia Cirac Jan 2023

Promoting Female Sporting Opportunities Without Title Ix: The Spanish Experience, Stephen Ross, Maria Josefa Garcia Cirac

Journal Articles

This article compares the American approach to improving sporting opportunities for females – Title IX – with approaches taken by Spain. Because of the singular American dedication to elite interscholastic and intercollegiate sports, Title IX’s requirement of equal treatment requires that elite female athletes have equivalent opportunities to elite male athletes. The Spanish approach looks instead on the social benefits of athletics participation for boys, men, girls, and women.


Interracial Coalition Building: A Filipino Lawyer In A Black-White Community, Victor C. Romero Jan 2023

Interracial Coalition Building: A Filipino Lawyer In A Black-White Community, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

The United States is in the midst of a political and cultural war around race and demography that goes to the heart of America’s self-definition as a nation of immigrants. Heeding Eric Yamamoto’s four-part prescription for interracial cooperation via the conceptual, the performative, the material, and the reflexive, this Essay draws from the author’s own experience as an Asian- American volunteer attempting to serve and lead a traditionally African-American civil rights organization in a predominantly white, rural town in Pennsylvania. Three lessons emerge from this experience. When volunteering, it is important to answer the call to serve even when in …