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Journal Articles

1998

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 63

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Curt Flood Act Of 1998: A Hollow Gesture After All These Years?, Edmund P. Edmonds Oct 1998

The Curt Flood Act Of 1998: A Hollow Gesture After All These Years?, Edmund P. Edmonds

Journal Articles

This article discusses the Curt Flood Act of 1998 and explores the nonstatutory labor exemption the Supreme Court has applied to professional sports leagues. It also explores the likely impact of the Curt Flood Act on the rights of players or managers to use antitrust laws effectively against one another.


Wise Replacements For Nwp 26, Kim Diana Connolly, Virginia S. Albrecht Sep 1998

Wise Replacements For Nwp 26, Kim Diana Connolly, Virginia S. Albrecht

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


University At Buffalo Law School: The New Curriculum, John Henry Schlegel May 1998

University At Buffalo Law School: The New Curriculum, John Henry Schlegel

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


"The New Yuppie Female Lawyer": The Impact Of Women On Divorce Law Practice, Lynn M. Mather Mar 1998

"The New Yuppie Female Lawyer": The Impact Of Women On Divorce Law Practice, Lynn M. Mather

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Faith And The Liberal Legal Order: An Appreciative Response To Shaffer And The Symbolism Workshop, Elizabeth B. Mensch Mar 1998

Faith And The Liberal Legal Order: An Appreciative Response To Shaffer And The Symbolism Workshop, Elizabeth B. Mensch

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Constitutional Fidelity, Matthew Steffey Jan 1998

Constitutional Fidelity, Matthew Steffey

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Law, Life, And Literature: A Critical Reflection Of Life And Literature To Illuminate How Laws Of Domestic Violence, Race, And Class Bind Black Women Based On Alice Walker's Book The Third Life Of Grange Copeland, Angela Mae Kupenda Jan 1998

Law, Life, And Literature: A Critical Reflection Of Life And Literature To Illuminate How Laws Of Domestic Violence, Race, And Class Bind Black Women Based On Alice Walker's Book The Third Life Of Grange Copeland, Angela Mae Kupenda

Journal Articles

Consider Law, Life and Literature. Which of the three is the most real, honest, and inclusive? Many would answer the law because it takes into consideration all of the facts and circumstances to formulate a clear and consistent rule, and literature is the most unreal, the most fictional of the three. However, that is not accurate. Of the three, literature is actually the most real, honest, and inclusive. It is real because, with brutal honesty, it deals with all of our realities. It is more honest than life, for often in our outer (and even inner) lives we are afraid …


The Religious Dimension Of Judicial Decision Making And The Defacto Disestablishment, Mark C. Modak-Truran Jan 1998

The Religious Dimension Of Judicial Decision Making And The Defacto Disestablishment, Mark C. Modak-Truran

Journal Articles

Despite the de facto disestablishment of religion, I will try to illustrate the centrality of religion as a resource for understanding judicial decision making. The central question for this inquiry is: What, if any, is the role of religious beliefs in judicial decision making?


Capturing Volition Itself: Employee Involvement And The Team Act, Johanna Oreskovic Jan 1998

Capturing Volition Itself: Employee Involvement And The Team Act, Johanna Oreskovic

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Of Babies, Bathwater, And Throwing Out Proof Structures: It Is Not Time To Jettison Mcdonnell Douglas, William Corbett Jan 1998

Of Babies, Bathwater, And Throwing Out Proof Structures: It Is Not Time To Jettison Mcdonnell Douglas, William Corbett

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Shall - Take No. 2, Debra R. Cohen Jan 1998

Shall - Take No. 2, Debra R. Cohen

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Equal Rights Advocates: Addressing The Legal Issues Of Women Of Color, Judy Scales-Trent Jan 1998

Equal Rights Advocates: Addressing The Legal Issues Of Women Of Color, Judy Scales-Trent

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Southern Character, Confederate Nationalism, And The Interpretation Of State Constitutions: A Case Study In Constitutional Argument, James A. Gardner Jan 1998

Southern Character, Confederate Nationalism, And The Interpretation Of State Constitutions: A Case Study In Constitutional Argument, James A. Gardner

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Endangered Species Wannabees, John Copeland Nagle Jan 1998

Endangered Species Wannabees, John Copeland Nagle

Journal Articles

Environmental law and theories of statutory interpretation have developed side by side in the United States during the past twenty-five years. Many of the leading environmental law cases are also statutory interpretation cases. China is different. China has enacted many environmental statutes, often patterned after foreign laws such as those in the United States, but there are no Chinese environmental law statutory interpretation cases.

This article examines why there are no such cases, and what we may learn from that fact. I am indebted to the work of Professor Stewart, whose engaging article in this symposium issue combines three of …


Kann Das Deutsche Verfassungsrechtsdenken Vorbild Fur Die Vereinigten Staaten Sein?, Donald P. Kommers Jan 1998

Kann Das Deutsche Verfassungsrechtsdenken Vorbild Fur Die Vereinigten Staaten Sein?, Donald P. Kommers

Journal Articles

Mein Thema läßt sich am besten als Frage formulieren: Was können wir Amerikaner von der Erfahrung der Deutschen mit dem Grundgesetz lernen? Diese Frage wurde für gewöhnlich in der anderen Richtung gestellt, näm lich: Was haben die Deutschen vom amerikanischen Verfassungsrecht ge lernt oder was sollten sie von ihm lernen?


Federal Criminal Conspiracy, Todd R. Russell, O. Carter Snead Jan 1998

Federal Criminal Conspiracy, Todd R. Russell, O. Carter Snead

Journal Articles

Under 18 U.S.C. § 371, it is a crime for "two or more persons [to] conspire . . . to commit any offense against the United States, or to defraud the United States, or any agency thereof in any manner or for any purpose."

This Article first outlines, in Section I, the basic elements of a conspiracy offense under § 371. Defenses available to challenge charges brought under the statute are discussed in Section III of the Article. Section IV presents the evidentiary and constitutional guidelines governing admissibility of co-conspirator hearsay testimony at trials involving conspiracy charges. Section V surveys …


Regulating The Use Of Force In The 21st Century: The Continuing Importance Of State Autonomy, Mary Ellen O'Connell Jan 1998

Regulating The Use Of Force In The 21st Century: The Continuing Importance Of State Autonomy, Mary Ellen O'Connell

Journal Articles

The most important, and certainly the most ambitious, modification of international law in this century has been the outlawing of the use of force to settle international disputes. The definitive prohibition on the use of force came with the adoption of the United Nations Charter and, in particular, Charter article 2(4).

For a short while, from 1991 until 1994, it appeared that a majority of Security Council members had re-interpreted the Charter's order of priorities. To some, it seemed that the Council had placed such values as human rights, self-determination, and even democracy above the value of peace through respect …


Fundamental Rights, Moral Law, And The Legal Defense Of Life In A Constitutional Democracy, Martin Rhonheimer, Paolo G. Carozza Jan 1998

Fundamental Rights, Moral Law, And The Legal Defense Of Life In A Constitutional Democracy, Martin Rhonheimer, Paolo G. Carozza

Journal Articles

Article by Martin Rhonheimer, translated by Paolo G. Carozza.


In Memoriam: Father Bill Lewers, Jay Tidmarsh Jan 1998

In Memoriam: Father Bill Lewers, Jay Tidmarsh

Journal Articles

There is an old and famous Irish blessing, the last line of which runs: "And may you be in heaven half an hour before the devil knows you're dead." If anyone ever deserved to be happily ensconced in heaven for the proverbial half-hour, it is Bill Lewers.

For the last fourteen years of his life among us, Bill spent his considerable energy improving our understanding and awareness of international human rights. It became Bill's great passion. In 1983, Bill was appointed as Director of the Office of International Justice and Peace for the United States Catholic Conference. When he returned …


On Teaching Legal Ethics With Stories About Clients, Thomas L. Shaffer Jan 1998

On Teaching Legal Ethics With Stories About Clients, Thomas L. Shaffer

Journal Articles

The comparison I have in mind is between what goes on at Notre Dame and what goes on in one of Professor James Boyd White's law and literature classes at the University of Michigan. Both classes use provocation. White provokes his students with an array of assigned readings, all of them about people, not all of them about law, ranging from Homer and Plato to Fowler on the split infinitive and the autobiography of Dick Gregory. We provoke our students with a parade of accounts from our members, accounts of people they think they can help.

White's enterprise is, I …


On The Practical Meaning Of Secularism, John M. Finnis Jan 1998

On The Practical Meaning Of Secularism, John M. Finnis

Journal Articles

The secularism I consider in this Article is a public reality, the secularism which shapes public debate, deliberation, dispositions, and action, and dominates our education and culture. I shall be considering the ideas, not the people; and people are often less consistent, and better, than their theories. There is no profit in estimating whether secularism's dominance now is greater than in Plato's Athens or lesser than in Stalin's Leningrad. There is certainly a rich field for historical investigation of the particular and often peculiar forms taken by western secularism under the influence of the faith it supplants. But I shall …


The Constitutionalism Of Mary Ann Glendon, Donald P. Kommers Jan 1998

The Constitutionalism Of Mary Ann Glendon, Donald P. Kommers

Journal Articles

Mary Ann Glendon is an accomplished legal scholar whose books and essays in the field of marriage and family law have received universal acclaim among her peers in the legal academy. More recently, and particularly in the last decade, she has emerged as a notable public intellectual. In this capacity, she has focused her careful reflections on topics such as abortion, religious liberty, social welfare legislation, the changing nature of the legal profession, and the condition of political discourse in America. One of the things that makes her recent work, as well as her earlier publications on family law, so …


The Compromise Of '38 And The Federal Courts Today, John H. Robinson Jan 1998

The Compromise Of '38 And The Federal Courts Today, John H. Robinson

Journal Articles

In 1998 the legal community of the United States should stop and take stock of two epochal events in the history of the federal judicial system. One of those events, as readers of a procedure symposium do not need to be told, is the sixtieth anniversary of the introduction of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. I shall have more to say about that event presently, but I want first to devote a few paragraphs to a second event, one which proceduralists ignore at their peril. The event I have in mind is the initiation of a new era of …


The Supreme Court's Impact On Marriage, 1967-90, Margaret F. Brinig Jan 1998

The Supreme Court's Impact On Marriage, 1967-90, Margaret F. Brinig

Journal Articles

In the twenty years following Loving, the Supreme Court decided a number of cases dealing with the family. Although the Court reasoned that it was protecting marriage and extending such protection to other forms of families, the perverse effect of these decisions was to weaken the most traditional family type of all, the nuclear family. Adults, and particularly pregnant women and unwed fathers, triumphed in this move towards autonomy and rights. The vanquished included those who depended upon the family for love and sustenance: minor children, elderly adults, and longtime homemakers.

This paper discusses these cases from a family law …


Tribal Court Praxis: One Year In The Life Of Twenty Tribal Courts, Nell Jessup Newton Jan 1998

Tribal Court Praxis: One Year In The Life Of Twenty Tribal Courts, Nell Jessup Newton

Journal Articles

For a presentation, I read the eighty-five cases published in the Indian Law Reporter during 1996. I was struck by the diversity of the issues, the difficulty, complexity and subtlety of the choice of law, and other procedural and substantive issues addressed. I was most impressed by the richness of the dialogue in tribal court opinions—a dialogue between the court and the tribal councils, tribal people, and members of the bar. One may also read the opinions as initiating a conversation with the general public. A conversation requires listening, however.

In this article, I will bring to light the work …


Whitehead's Metaphysics And The Law: A Dialogue, Jay Tidmarsh Jan 1998

Whitehead's Metaphysics And The Law: A Dialogue, Jay Tidmarsh

Journal Articles

The purposes of this Article are to explore the relationship between Alfred North Whitehead's process philosophy and the nature of law, and to develop from that exploration a theory of "process jurisprudence." To some extent, this Article is a process of interpretation and imagination. Whitehead himself devoted little attention to the nature of law. Therefore, rather than attempting to declare definitively the implications of Whitehead's thought for the nature of law, this Article is structured in the form of a dialogue between "Whitehead" and a lawyer whom I have called "Chris." In Part II, as he discusses his system of …


The Jurisprudence Of John Howard Yoder, Thomas L. Shaffer Jan 1998

The Jurisprudence Of John Howard Yoder, Thomas L. Shaffer

Journal Articles

John Howard Yoder, prophet and theologian, died in his office at Notre Dame on December 30, 1997, the day after his seventieth birthday. Peter Steinfels's obituary in the New York Times of January 7, 1998, described my friend and colleague Yoder as "a Mennonite theologian whose writings on Christianity and politics had a major impact on contemporary Christian thinking about the church and social ethics." Steinfels did not describe Yoder's thought as jurisprudence; neither, for that matter, did Yoder. But there was (and is), throughout Yoder's scholarship, an implicit theology of law, a jurisprudence. A jurisprudence that is particularly noticeable …


Playing Noah, John C. Nagle Jan 1998

Playing Noah, John C. Nagle

Journal Articles

The biblical story of Noah and the ark has been cited by numerous writers as a justification for the protections contained in the Endangered Species Act. In that story, Genesis reports that God instructed Noah to save two of every species from the flood that would destroy life on earth, and that after doing so God established a covenant with Noah and the animals that were saved. The story has inspired writers and activists to posit a duty to imitate Noah today when we struggle to provide the resources and the will to protect all species, however popular or obscure, …


The Bankruptcy Puzzle, Margaret F. Brinig, F. H. Buckley Jan 1998

The Bankruptcy Puzzle, Margaret F. Brinig, F. H. Buckley

Journal Articles

This article offers new evidence on the determinants of U.S. consumer bankruptcy filing rates, which tripled from 1984 to 1991. The run-up in filing rates does not appear to be a consequence of legal changes since the increase coincided with Bankruptcy Code amendments designed to reduce filing rates by rejecting opportunistic petitions. The run-up also coincided with a major economic boom and crested with the 1991 recession. However, much of the variation in district filing rates is attributable to differences in social variables, and we suggest that changes in social norms might account for the increased bankruptcy filings. This article …


Catholic Judges In Capital Cases, Amy Coney Barrett, John H. Garvey Jan 1998

Catholic Judges In Capital Cases, Amy Coney Barrett, John H. Garvey

Journal Articles

The Catholic Church's opposition to the death penalty places Catholic judges in a moral and legal bind. While these judges are obliged by oath, professional commitment, and the demands of citizenship to enforce the death penalty, they are also obliged to adhere to their church's teaching on moral matters. Although the legal system has a solution for this dilemma by allowing the recusal of judges whose convictions keep them from doing their job, Catholic judges will want to sit whenever possible without acting immorally. However, litigants and the general public are entitled to impartial justice, which may be something a …