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Full-Text Articles in Law

Madison's Hope: Virtue, Self-Interest, And The Design Of Electoral Systems, James A. Gardner Oct 2000

Madison's Hope: Virtue, Self-Interest, And The Design Of Electoral Systems, James A. Gardner

Journal Articles

In recent years, perhaps no institution of American governance has been so thoroughly and consistently excoriated by legal theorists as the familiar American system of winner-take-all elections. The winner-take-all system is said to waste votes, lead to majority monopolization of political power, and cause the under representation and consequent social and economic subordination of political minorities. Some political scientists have attempted to defend winner-take-all systems on the ground that they perform better than PR in maximizing long-term collective and social interests. This article argues, in contrast, that winner-take-all electoral systems rest upon, and can be adequately defended, if at all, …


Can Party Politics Be Virtuous?, James A. Gardner Apr 2000

Can Party Politics Be Virtuous?, James A. Gardner

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Whose Risk, Whose Security?, Martha T. Mccluskey Jan 2000

Whose Risk, Whose Security?, Martha T. Mccluskey

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Corrective Justice And The Revival Of Judicial Virtue, Mark C. Modak-Truran Jan 2000

Corrective Justice And The Revival Of Judicial Virtue, Mark C. Modak-Truran

Journal Articles

Judges must be wise. Sound judicial reasoning requires moral virtue. These sentiments about judging have been lost. They apparently belong to a bygone era. While many advocate self-restraint or prudence as judicial virtues, moral virtue has been conspicuously absent from the list. Except for avoiding obvious vices such as bribery, favoritism, prejudice, sloth, and arbitrariness, conventional wisdom maintains that being a good judge does not require being a good person. Even theorists sympathetic to a relationship between law and morality balk at making moral virtue a prerequisite of judicial decision making. Rather, many contend that judicial decision making is a …


In Service To America: Naturalization Of Undocumented Alien Veterans, Darlene Goring Jan 2000

In Service To America: Naturalization Of Undocumented Alien Veterans, Darlene Goring

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Private Problem, Public Solution: Affirmative Action In The 21st Century, Darlene Goring Jan 2000

Private Problem, Public Solution: Affirmative Action In The 21st Century, Darlene Goring

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Whose Team Am I On Anyway - Musings Of A Public Defender About Drug Treatment Court Practice, Mae C. Quinn Jan 2000

Whose Team Am I On Anyway - Musings Of A Public Defender About Drug Treatment Court Practice, Mae C. Quinn

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Inverting The Viability Test For Abortion Law, Bruce Ching Jan 2000

Inverting The Viability Test For Abortion Law, Bruce Ching

Journal Articles

The abortion controversy is likely to become even more pressing with the development of technological advancements that enhance the chances for fetal survival of the abortion procedure. This essay explores the consequences of recognizing that keeping the fetus alive does not depend on keeping the fetus in utero.


"Streamlined" Permits, Migratory Birds And Draining Ditches: Recent Developments Confirm Need To Amend Statutory Wetlands Protection, Kim Diana Connolly Jan 2000

"Streamlined" Permits, Migratory Birds And Draining Ditches: Recent Developments Confirm Need To Amend Statutory Wetlands Protection, Kim Diana Connolly

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Five Years After Beijing: A Report Card On Women’S Human Rights, Athena D. Mutua Jan 2000

Five Years After Beijing: A Report Card On Women’S Human Rights, Athena D. Mutua

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


The Good Samaritan And Admiralty: A Parable Of A Statute Lost At Sea, Patrick J. Long Jan 2000

The Good Samaritan And Admiralty: A Parable Of A Statute Lost At Sea, Patrick J. Long

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Natural Law, Marriage, And The Thought Of Karol Wojtyla, John J. Coughlin Jan 2000

Natural Law, Marriage, And The Thought Of Karol Wojtyla, John J. Coughlin

Journal Articles

This Article examines the loss of the natural law perspective from legal theory and the movement towards liberal theory. The Article continues by analyzing two features of the natural law tradition as described in the philosophical writings of Karol Wojtyla. The first feature concerns marriage and family as the fundamental human community. The second considers marriage as a virtuous relationship. The Article concludes with practical suggestions for the legal profession and legal education with regard to counseling clients about marriage.


Law And Theology: Reflections On What It Means To Be Human From A Franciscan Perspective, John J. Coughlin Jan 2000

Law And Theology: Reflections On What It Means To Be Human From A Franciscan Perspective, John J. Coughlin

Journal Articles

When I was first asked in March of 2000 to speak at this conference on the topic of "law and theology," many thoughts crossed my mind. I could address: the role of religion in American political life, euthanasia, medieval canon law and theology, the death penalty, the Jewish origins of the Pauline perspective on law, the ethics of DNA experimentation, Muslim theology and law, the relation between Marxist political theory and Christian eschatology, or several other "light" issues. Upon second thought, perhaps a more straight-forward approach would be beneficial. I might review the plan of salvation history, and then as …


States' Rights In The Twenty-First Century, Jay Tidmarsh, Mark Racicot, Robert Miller, Michael Greve Jan 2000

States' Rights In The Twenty-First Century, Jay Tidmarsh, Mark Racicot, Robert Miller, Michael Greve

Journal Articles

My name is Jim Schueller and I'm the Symposium Editor of the Law School Journal of Legislation and every two years we organize a symposium to discuss relevant issue of public policy and the topic this year is States Rights in the 21st Century.

Well, way back in the 18th century when the framers drafted the Constitution they created a unique system of governing where power was shared between the states which already existed and the newly created federal government. The framers in their day debated the proper allocation of power between these two governments and today, two hundred eleven …


On The Incoherence Of Legal Positivism, John M. Finnis Jan 2000

On The Incoherence Of Legal Positivism, John M. Finnis

Journal Articles

Legal positivism is an incoherent intellectual enterprise. It sets itself an explanatory task which it makes itself incapable of carrying through. In the result it offers its students purported and invalid derivations of ought from is.

In this brief Essay I note various features of legal positivism and its history, before trying to identify this incoherence at its heart. I do not mean to renege on my belief that reflections on law and legal theory are best carried forward without reference to unstable and parasitic academic categories, or labels, such as "positivism" (or "liberalism" or "conservatism," etc.). I use the …


Taking Pierce Seriously: The Family, Religious Education, And Harm To Children, Richard W. Garnett Jan 2000

Taking Pierce Seriously: The Family, Religious Education, And Harm To Children, Richard W. Garnett

Journal Articles

Many States exempt religious parents from prosecution, or limit their exposure to criminal liability, when their failure to seek medical care for their sick or injured children is motivated by religious belief. This paper explores the question what, if anything, the debate about these exemptions says about the state's authority to override parents' decisions about education, particularly religious education. If we accept, for example, that the state may in some cases require medical treatment for a child, over her parents' objections, to avoid serious injury or death, should it follow that it may regulate, or even forbid, a child's religious …


More's Skill, Thomas L. Shaffer Jan 2000

More's Skill, Thomas L. Shaffer

Journal Articles

Robert Bolt chose a phrase from a sixteenth century poet named Robert Whittinton for the title of his modem play about Thomas More: "[A] man of an angel's wit and singular learning; I know not his fellow. For where is the man of that gentleness, lowliness, and affability? And as time requireth a man of marvellous mirth and pastimes; and sometimes of as sad gravity: a man for all seasons."

Bolt's title suggests that he took a gamble on the possibility that More would have modern, universal appeal. I have been interested in how that gamble worked out. If you …


Choosing The Lesser Evil: Comments On Besharov's "Child Abuse Realities", Margaret F. Brinig Jan 2000

Choosing The Lesser Evil: Comments On Besharov's "Child Abuse Realities", Margaret F. Brinig

Journal Articles

Determining the degree of state intervention into intra-family decision making requires an unhappy choice between allowing abuse to continue or interfering with some families that would be better left alone. Mr. Besharov introduces the possible harms associated with the increased involvement of the state but fails to fully comprehend the circumstances that necessitate such involvement. Evils bracket the phenomenon discussed in Mr. Besharov's paper and this one. The difference in our approach lies in the choice we think is the lesser evil of the two, not that we think that either the harms associated with state involvement or the risk …


What O'Clock I Say: Juridical Epistemics And The Magisterium Of The Church, Robert E. Rodes Jan 2000

What O'Clock I Say: Juridical Epistemics And The Magisterium Of The Church, Robert E. Rodes

Journal Articles

Legal pronouncements to the effect that such and such is the case can be divided into three categories, which the paper calls normative, constitutive, and epistemic. The paper defines these three legal categories, explores examples of each of in the law of the state, and then examines church pronouncements under the same categories to see what light the analogy of secular law can shed on them. The Church's assertions of authority regarding faith and morals are epistemic in nature. Epistemic pronouncements by authority, whether in Church or state, are binding on anyone who is not better informed than the author, …


The Recusal Alternative To Campaign Finance Legislation, John C. Nagle Jan 2000

The Recusal Alternative To Campaign Finance Legislation, John C. Nagle

Journal Articles

Typical campaign finance proposals focus on limiting the amount of money that can be contributed to candidates and the amount of money that candidates can spend. This article suggests an alternative proposal that places no restrictions on contributions or spending, but rather targets the corrupting influence of contributions. Under the proposals, legislators would be required to recuse themselves from voting on issues directly affecting contributors. I contend that this proposal would prevent corruption and the appearance of corruption while remedying the first amendment objections to the regulation of money in campaigns.


School Choice, The First Amendment, And Social Justice, Nicole Stelle Garnett, Richard W. Garnett Jan 2000

School Choice, The First Amendment, And Social Justice, Nicole Stelle Garnett, Richard W. Garnett

Journal Articles

This Article is intended to be a primer on the legality and morality of educational choice—"School Choice in a Nutshell," if you will. We are resigned to being pre-empted by the tireless work of grassroots activists, the choices of voters, and the decisions of judges. Still, we hope, in somewhat polemical fashion, to establish two basic claims. First, school choice, properly understood, is constitutional. And second, school choice is both sensible and just.

In the end, we believe "school choice . . . is essential to achieving equality of opportunity for American children, rich or poor. School choice treats the …


A Comparison Of The Administrative Law Of The Catholic Church And The United States, John J. Coughlin Jan 2000

A Comparison Of The Administrative Law Of The Catholic Church And The United States, John J. Coughlin

Journal Articles

Some years ago, an international symposium of jurists described administrative law as encompassing "the entire range of action by government with respect to the citizen or by the citizen with respect to the government, except for those matters dealt with by the criminal law, and those left to private civil litigation where the government's only participation is in furnishing an impartial tribunal with the power of enforcement."

The broad parameters of the concept of administrative law attest to its importance in any legal system. Indeed, for at least the past fifty years, comparative legal scholars have focused on diverse national …


Casting Light On Cultural Property (Book Review), John Costonis Jan 2000

Casting Light On Cultural Property (Book Review), John Costonis

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Statutory Interpretation In The Courtroom, The Classroom, And Canadian Legal Literature, Stephen F. Ross Jan 2000

Statutory Interpretation In The Courtroom, The Classroom, And Canadian Legal Literature, Stephen F. Ross

Journal Articles

In recent years, judges and scholars in Canada and the United States are devoting more attention to the theory and techniques involved in statutory interpretation. Although some advocate "foundational" theories to answer all theories of interpretation, most difficult cases require a pragmatic approach that requires analysis of the statutory text, original legislative intent, and legislative purpose in light of modern circumstances. Moreover, the most difficult cases may not be answerable by any of these approaches. In difficult cases, judges often resort to "normative canons" - rules they created to further a jurisprudence they desire. These canons need to be closely …


Federal Jurisdiction And Procedure, Keith B. Hall Jan 2000

Federal Jurisdiction And Procedure, Keith B. Hall

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Critical Race Theory And International Law: The View Of An Insider-Outsider, Makau Mutua Jan 2000

Critical Race Theory And International Law: The View Of An Insider-Outsider, Makau Mutua

Journal Articles

This article contends that international law, like national law, is captive to the racial biases and hierarchies that hide injustice under the pretext of legal neutrality and universality. It argues that international law is tormented by racist and hegemonic asymmetries that govern the international order. The piece posits that international law could benefit greatly from the method of critical race theory in unpacking the pathologies of power and race that define it. It focuses on the use of international law to conceive and buttress the exploitation and marginalization of the North by the South. It calls for a reconstruction of …


The Voice Of Willard Hurst, Alfred S. Konefsky Jan 2000

The Voice Of Willard Hurst, Alfred S. Konefsky

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Incorporation Of "Private" Environmental Certification Systems In Formal Legal Systems: The U.S. Case., Errol E. Meidinger Jan 2000

Incorporation Of "Private" Environmental Certification Systems In Formal Legal Systems: The U.S. Case., Errol E. Meidinger

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


A Comparative Constitutional Law Canon, Donald P. Kommers, John E. Finn Jan 2000

A Comparative Constitutional Law Canon, Donald P. Kommers, John E. Finn

Journal Articles

The article discusses what types of legal cases constitute a “canon” on American constitutional theory and comparative constitutional law, examples of case law that illustrate important developments in the two subjects. It describes the process taken by the article's authors to select a small sampling of 90 “canon” cases for their course book on American constitutional law, which is designed for the academic community and for undergraduate students enrolled in a traditional liberal arts curriculum.


The Basic Law: A Fifty Year Assessment, Donald P. Kommers Jan 2000

The Basic Law: A Fifty Year Assessment, Donald P. Kommers

Journal Articles

In 1949 the new German Basic Law raised many questions. Could a newly minted constitution-mere words on paper-breathe new life into a people devastated by war? Would it serve as a stable framework of government? Would it promote respect for human rights and popular government? Would it foster internal political unity? Half a century later all these questions can be answered in the affirmative. The Basic Law is one of the world’s most respected and imitated constitutions and it has emerged as the vital center of Germany's constitutional culture. It is invoked repeatedly in parliamentary debates and resorted to in …