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Journal Articles

2006

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Cali Lessons In Legal Research Courses: Alternatives To Reading About Research, Elizabeth G. Adelman Oct 2006

Cali Lessons In Legal Research Courses: Alternatives To Reading About Research, Elizabeth G. Adelman

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Gendering The Gentrification Of Public Housing: Hope Vi's Disparate Impact On Lowest-Income African American Women, Danielle Pelfrey Duryea Oct 2006

Gendering The Gentrification Of Public Housing: Hope Vi's Disparate Impact On Lowest-Income African American Women, Danielle Pelfrey Duryea

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Theorizing The Diffusion Of Law: Conceptual Difficulties, Unstable Imaginations, And The Effort To Think Gracefully Nonetheless, David A. Westbrook Jul 2006

Theorizing The Diffusion Of Law: Conceptual Difficulties, Unstable Imaginations, And The Effort To Think Gracefully Nonetheless, David A. Westbrook

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


My God, My Choice: The Mature Minor Doctrine And Adolescent Refusal Of Life-Saving Or Sustaining Medical Treatment Based Upon Religious Beliefs, Jonathan Will Apr 2006

My God, My Choice: The Mature Minor Doctrine And Adolescent Refusal Of Life-Saving Or Sustaining Medical Treatment Based Upon Religious Beliefs, Jonathan Will

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Examining A Comparative Law Myth: Two Hundred Years Of Riparian Misconception, Andrea B. Carroll Feb 2006

Examining A Comparative Law Myth: Two Hundred Years Of Riparian Misconception, Andrea B. Carroll

Journal Articles

This article is a first step in an effort to critically examine - and to debunk - some of the myths that persist about the degree to which the common and civil law systems differ. Specifically, the article questions the validity of recent scholarly commentary suggesting that the primary differences between the systems can be found in their substantive legal rules or in their respective "spirits." A relatively narrow issue of riparian access perfectly highlights the problem. Nearly all of the high courts in the United States that have examined this particular riparian issue have chosen to adopt either the …


The Administrative Law Of Global Private-Public Regulation: The Case Of Forestry, Errol E. Meidinger Feb 2006

The Administrative Law Of Global Private-Public Regulation: The Case Of Forestry, Errol E. Meidinger

Journal Articles

An important ensemble of transnational, transgovernmental regulatory institutions has emerged in the forestry sector over the past decade. These forest certification programmes set global standards for proper forest management and apply them through institutionalized licensing and inspection programmes. Similar programmes are appearing in other sectors. Developed largely by environmental NGOs and industry associations rather than governments, forest certification programmes are nominally voluntary, but are becoming increasingly mandatory in practice. They are also gradually linking with government regulatory and management programmes in various ways, while remaining in tension both with each other and with government programmes. The overall regulatory system is …


Transnational Media Law At The Bar And In The Classroom, Jack M. Weiss Jan 2006

Transnational Media Law At The Bar And In The Classroom, Jack M. Weiss

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Fahrenheit 451on Cell Block D: A Bar Examination To Safeguard America’S Jailhouse Lawyers From The Post-Lewis Blaze Consuming Their Law Libraries, Evan R. Seamone Jan 2006

Fahrenheit 451on Cell Block D: A Bar Examination To Safeguard America’S Jailhouse Lawyers From The Post-Lewis Blaze Consuming Their Law Libraries, Evan R. Seamone

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Understanding The Person Beneath The Robe: Practical Methods For Neutralizing Harmful Judicial Biases, Evan R. Seamone Jan 2006

Understanding The Person Beneath The Robe: Practical Methods For Neutralizing Harmful Judicial Biases, Evan R. Seamone

Journal Articles

This article presents hands-on self-awareness techniques for use by judges, arbitrators, members of commissions, and other legal decision-makers who are confronted with complex cases. All too often, these judges are expected to make the “right” decisions without knowing how to accomplish this task. While judges, no doubt, are capable of applying the law to a case, this is only one aspect of righteous behavior. This article is concerned with the related expectation that judges are capable of rendering fair and impartial decisions. No matter how much training they receive, judges can only avoid biases that are known to them.


A Tribute To My Friend, Wendy B. Scott Jan 2006

A Tribute To My Friend, Wendy B. Scott

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


From An Act Of God To The Failure Of Man: Hurricane Katrina And The Economic Recovery Of New Orleans, Wendy B. Scott Jan 2006

From An Act Of God To The Failure Of Man: Hurricane Katrina And The Economic Recovery Of New Orleans, Wendy B. Scott

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Law School Faculty As Mentors, Jim Rosenblatt Jan 2006

Law School Faculty As Mentors, Jim Rosenblatt

Journal Articles

Professors see potential in our students that they do not see themselves. Based on his or her knowledge of the student and his or her awareness of student performance in the classroom and on examinations, a professor might suggest a career path, an intern opportunity, a research topic, an advanced degree, or a job contact that the student had not considered through the "door opening" process by which the professor opens doors and helps the law student see what is behind that door. Without this mentoring assistance that door may never have been opened by the student left to her …


Book Review, Mark C. Modak-Truran Jan 2006

Book Review, Mark C. Modak-Truran

Journal Articles

In volume 1, James Hitchcock provides a comprehensive historical treatment of all the U.S. Supreme Court cases involving the religion clauses. Volume 2 focuses on the broader “context of the continuing dialogue about the role of religion in public life” and its relationship to the Court’s interpretation of the religion clauses.


Seeking Different Treatment, Or Seeking The Same Regard: Remarketing The Transracial Adoption Debate, Angela Mae Kupenda Jan 2006

Seeking Different Treatment, Or Seeking The Same Regard: Remarketing The Transracial Adoption Debate, Angela Mae Kupenda

Journal Articles

The transracial adoption discourse mistakenly has been phrased as a request for black children awaiting adoption to be treated different from white children and to be placed with parents of like race only. This paper urges a remarketing of the transracial adoption debate to reflect a request based on sameness, not difference. The request presented here is not a request for different treatment for black children. Rather, it is for black children to be given the same regard that is given to white children. This request is illustrated with the story of a black couple seeking to adopt healthy, fat …


Book Review, Deborah Challener Jan 2006

Book Review, Deborah Challener

Journal Articles

COURTIERS OF THE MARBLE PALACE is a compelling, informative book. As much as anything, it is a tremendous informational source for anyone interested in the Supreme Court. It is evident that the author has thoroughly researched the topic and provided the reader with a factual view of the past and present responsibilities of a Supreme Court law clerk. Because Peppers relies on principal-agent theory to develop his hypotheses and used exhaustive research to prove them, the book also appears to be objective.


International Rule Of Law And The Market Economy - An Outline, Samuel Bufford Jan 2006

International Rule Of Law And The Market Economy - An Outline, Samuel Bufford

Journal Articles

Law matters in economic development. The Rule of Law is an indispensable foundation for a market economy, which provides an essential environment for the creation and preservation of wealth, economic security, and well-being, and the improvement of the quality of life. The Rule of Law is part of the "software" of governmental regulation that is needed to operate the "hardware" of free markets. Its promotion can make a major contribution to economic growth, and an infrastructure that creates and promites legal rights is an essential platform for economic development. The cumulative costs of doing without the Rule of Law in …


The Narrowing Of The National Labor Relations Act: Maintaining Workplace Decorum And Avoiding Liability, William R. Corbett Jan 2006

The Narrowing Of The National Labor Relations Act: Maintaining Workplace Decorum And Avoiding Liability, William R. Corbett

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Revisiting Anna Moscowitz's Kross's Critique Of New York City's Women's Court: The Continued Problem Of Solving The "Problem" Of Prostitution With Specialized Criminal Courts, Mae C. Quinn Jan 2006

Revisiting Anna Moscowitz's Kross's Critique Of New York City's Women's Court: The Continued Problem Of Solving The "Problem" Of Prostitution With Specialized Criminal Courts, Mae C. Quinn

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Limited Liability Company Citizenship: Reconsidering An Illogical And Inconsistent Choice, Debra R. Cohen Jan 2006

Limited Liability Company Citizenship: Reconsidering An Illogical And Inconsistent Choice, Debra R. Cohen

Journal Articles

The trend in diversity actions in Federal Court is to rigidly apply the formalistic rules for determining citizenship (aggregate or entity) to deem limited liability companies (LLCs) to have aggregate or "partnership" citizenship. While the approach is designed to reduce the federal docket; there is no evidence that it works. More importantly, this result-oriented approach is not based on well-reasoned analysis. This approach creates several illogical and inconsistent results. It bears no reflection on modern business realities, it undermines well established principles of law, and it undercuts the purpose for which diversity jurisdiction was established, This article suggests that, just …


Redefining Open Access For The Legal Information Market, James G. Milles Jan 2006

Redefining Open Access For The Legal Information Market, James G. Milles

Journal Articles

The open access movement in legal scholarship, inasmuch as it is driven within the law library community over concerns about the rising cost of legal information, fails to address - and in fact diverts resources from - the real problem facing law libraries today: the soaring costs of nonscholarly, commercially published, practitioner-oriented legal publications. The current system of legal scholarly publishing - in student-edited journals and without meaningful peer review - does not face the pressures to increase prices common in the science and health disciplines. One solution to this problem is for law schools to redirect some of their …


Free Wage Labor And The Suffrage In Nineteenth Century England, Robert J. Steinfeld Jan 2006

Free Wage Labor And The Suffrage In Nineteenth Century England, Robert J. Steinfeld

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Lawmaking By Public Welfare Professionals, Gerald Jogerst, Jeanette Daly, Jeffrey Dawson, Gretchen Schmuch, Margaret F. Brinig Jan 2006

Lawmaking By Public Welfare Professionals, Gerald Jogerst, Jeanette Daly, Jeffrey Dawson, Gretchen Schmuch, Margaret F. Brinig

Journal Articles

When thinking of law-making, one usually thinks of the activities of Congress or state legislatures. Students of law and government may also think of the rule-making activities of federal or state bureaucracies. More recently, some attention has been paid to the lawmaking power known as prosecutorial discretion (the decision of whether or for what crimes to charge a criminal defendant) or judicial discretion in sentencing. However, so far most of this work has been theoretical or, at best, anecdotal. Further, far less attention has been paid to the ubiquitous activities of the bureaucrat who must decide whether or not to …


Religion, Division, And The First Amendment, Richard W. Garnett Jan 2006

Religion, Division, And The First Amendment, Richard W. Garnett

Journal Articles

Nearly thirty-five years ago, in Lemon v. Kurtzman, Chief Justice Warren Burger declared that state programs or policies could excessive(ly) - and, therefore, unconstitutionally - entangle government and religion, not only by requiring or allowing intrusive public monitoring of religious institutions and activities, but also through what he called their divisive political potential. Chief Justice Burger asserted also, and more fundamentally, that political division along religious lines was one of the principal evils against which the First Amendment was intended to protect. And from this Hobbesian premise about the inten(t) animating the First Amendment, he proceeded on the assumption that …


Washington's "War Against Terrorism" And Human Rights: The View From Abroad, Douglass Cassel Jan 2006

Washington's "War Against Terrorism" And Human Rights: The View From Abroad, Douglass Cassel

Journal Articles

"When it comes to human rights, there is no greater leader than the United States of America," White House spokesman Scott McClellan has said.

The view from abroad is less kind. A recent resolution of the European Parliament, for example, "condemns" our government's treatment of prisoners at Guantanamo. It urges Washington to guarantee all prisoners "minimum human rights in accordance with international human rights law and fair trial procedures" and to "immediately clarify the situation of the prisoners." European objections run so deep that a New York Times account finds a "high level of anger in Europe at reports that …


William H. Rehnquist: A Life Lived Greatly, And Well, Richard W. Garnett Jan 2006

William H. Rehnquist: A Life Lived Greatly, And Well, Richard W. Garnett

Journal Articles

Chief Justice Rehnquist leaves behind a formidable and important legacy in constitutional law. His work on the Court was animated and guided by the view that We the People, through our Constitution, have authorized our federal courts, legislators, and administrators to do many things - but not everything. Because the Nation's powers are few and defined, Congress may not pursue every good idea or smart policy, nor should courts invalidate every foolish or immoral one. However, for those of us who knew, worked with, learned from, and cared about William Rehnquist, it is his unassuming manner, the care he took …


Pound's Century, And Ours, Jay Tidmarsh Jan 2006

Pound's Century, And Ours, Jay Tidmarsh

Journal Articles

On August 29, 1906, a little known Nebraska lawyer climbed to the podium at the twenty-ninth American Bar Association convention in St. Paul, Minnesota, and commenced the most thoroughly successful revolution in American law. The lawyer was Roscoe Pound, and the title of his address was The Causes of Popular Dissatisfaction with the Administration of Justice. The speech was hardly popular in its own time. The ABA nearly refused to publish the remarks. Thirty-two years would pass before Pound's seeds fully flowered. Even today, many of Pound's criticisms of our adversarial civil justice system ring as true as the day …


Defending Human Rights In The "War" Against Terror, Douglass Cassel Jan 2006

Defending Human Rights In The "War" Against Terror, Douglass Cassel

Journal Articles

Safeguarding human rights in our "war" against terrorism is both the right and the smart thing to do. It is right because human rights embody our fundamental values as Americans and as Christians. Our Constitution stands for freedom; our Creator teaches us to respect the God-given dignity of each human soul. Christians are called to cherish human dignity, not only of innocents, and not only of captives in war whose status as combatant or civilian may be uncertain, but also of cardinal sinners, the terrorists themselves. Christ Jesus teaches us to hate the sin, but somehow to bring ourselves to …


Introduction: Religion, Division, And The Constitution, Richard W. Garnett Jan 2006

Introduction: Religion, Division, And The Constitution, Richard W. Garnett

Journal Articles

Thirty-five years ago, in his landmark Lemon v. Kurtzman opinion, Chief Justice Warren Burger declared that state actions could "excessive[ly]"—and, therefore, unconstitutionally—"entangle" government and religion, not only by requiring or allowing intrusive monitoring by officials of religious institutions and activities, but also through their "divisive political potential." He worried that government actions burdened with this "potential" pose a "threat to the normal political process and "divert attention from the myriad issues and problems that confront every level of government." And, he insisted that "political division along religious lines was one of the principal evils against which the First Amendment was …


The Fundamental Rights Of The Shareholder, Julian Velasco Jan 2006

The Fundamental Rights Of The Shareholder, Julian Velasco

Journal Articles

Shareholders have many legal rights, but they are not all of equal significance. This article will argue that two rights — the right to elect directors and the right to sell shares — are more important than any others, that these rights should be considered the fundamental rights of the shareholder, and that, as such, they deserve a great deal of respect and protection by law.

The history of corporate law has been one of increasing flexibility for directors and decreasing rights for shareholders. Although the law seems to have coalesced around the norm of shareholder primacy, this is not …


Prophecy And Casuistry: Abortion, Torture And Moral Discourse, M. Cathleen Kaveny Jan 2006

Prophecy And Casuistry: Abortion, Torture And Moral Discourse, M. Cathleen Kaveny

Journal Articles

In turn of the 21st century United States there are serious moral disputes over issues such as abortion and torture among persons who see themselves as belonging to the same moral tradition. These disputes have not given rise to fruitful discussion about differences, but instead led to a breakdown of conversation and even of community. A part of these clashes and breakdowns are not the result of mutually inconsistent moral premises, but are driven by tensions between two styles of moral discourse, the prophetic and casuistical. The former invokes the absolute and fiery rhetorical style of biblical prophets while the …