Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History of Philosophy Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1,411 Full-Text Articles 755 Authors 431,354 Downloads 104 Institutions

All Articles in History of Philosophy

Faceted Search

1,411 full-text articles. Page 1 of 34.

Berkeley On Infinite Divisibility, David Mwakima 2020 University of California, Irvine

Berkeley On Infinite Divisibility, David Mwakima

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

Berkeley, arguing against Barrow, claims that the infinite divisibility of finite lines is neither an axiom nor a theorem in Euclid The Thirteen Books of The Elements. Instead, he suggests that it is rooted in ancient prejudice. In this paper, I attempt to substantiate Berkeley’s claims by looking carefully at the history and practice of ancient geometry as a first step towards understanding Berkeley’s mathematical atomism.


Berkeley On Perceptual Discrimination Of Physical Objects, Keota Fields 2020 Western University

Berkeley On Perceptual Discrimination Of Physical Objects, Keota Fields

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

Commentators are divided over whether Berkeley holds that physical objects are immediately perceived by sense. As I read Berkeley, discrimination is necessary for perceiving physical objects by sense. Berkeley says that discrimination requires perceiving motion. Since motions can only be mediately perceived according to Berkeley, physical objects can only be mediately perceived by sense. I defend this reading against the following objections. First, that perception of physical objects is non-conceptual. Second, that physical objects are divinely instituted collections of ideas rather than psychologically associated collections of ideas. Third, that some physical objects are small enough to be immediately perceptually discriminated ...


Browne’S Critique Of Religious Propositions In Berkeley: A Reply To Pearce, Benjamin Formanek 2020 Western University

Browne’S Critique Of Religious Propositions In Berkeley: A Reply To Pearce, Benjamin Formanek

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Does Berkeley Anthropomorphize God, Kenneth Pearce 2020 Western University

Does Berkeley Anthropomorphize God, Kenneth Pearce

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

Berkeley occasionally says that we use analogy in thinking and speaking of God (Alc, §4.21). However, the scholarly consensus is that Berkeley rejects the traditional doctrine of divine analogy and holds instead that words like ‘wise’ apply to God in precisely the same way as they apply to Socrates. The difference is only a matter of degree (Daniel 2011; Curtin 2014; Pearce 2018; Fasko 2018). Univocal theories of the divine attributes have historically been charged with anthropomorphism—that is, with imagining God to be too similar to human beings (see Maimonides, Guide, ch. 1.1). Can Berkeley fairly be ...


Day 3 Schedule, Benjamin Hill 2020 Western

Day 3 Schedule, Benjamin Hill

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Thomas Reid And The Priority Thesis: A Defence Against Turri, Benjamin Formanek, Lewis Powell 2020 Western

Thomas Reid And The Priority Thesis: A Defence Against Turri, Benjamin Formanek, Lewis Powell

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

No abstract provided.


What Makes Hume An External World Skeptic?, Graham Clay, David Landy, Nathan Rockwood 2020 Notre Dame

What Makes Hume An External World Skeptic?, Graham Clay, David Landy, Nathan Rockwood

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

What would it take for Hume to be an external world skeptic? Is Hume's position on knowledge sufficient to force him to deny that we can acquire knowledge of (non-logical) propositions about the external world? After all, Hume is extremely restrictive about what can be known because he requires knowledge to be immune to error. In this paper, I will argue that if Hume were a skeptic, then he must also deny a particular kind of view about what is immediately present to the mind. I will argue that direct realisms—views that maintain that mind-independent (i.e. ontologically ...


Berkeley’S A Priori Argument For God’S Existence, Daniel H. Stephen, Alberto Luis Lopez 2020 Texas A&M University, College Station

Berkeley’S A Priori Argument For God’S Existence, Daniel H. Stephen, Alberto Luis Lopez

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

Berkeley’s appeal to a posteriori arguments for God’s existence supports belief only in a God who is finite. But by appealing to an a priori argument for God’s existence, Berkeley emphasizes God’s infinity. In this latter argument, God is not the efficient cause of particular finite things in the world, for such an explanation does not provide a justification or rationale for why the totality of finite things would exist in the first place. Instead, God is understood as the creator of the total unity of all there is, the whole of creation. In this a ...


Kant’S Long Shadow On The Interpretation Of Swedenborg, Hasse Hämäläinen, Alin Varciu 2020 Jagiellonian University in Kraków

Kant’S Long Shadow On The Interpretation Of Swedenborg, Hasse Hämäläinen, Alin Varciu

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

Among the readers of Swedenborg, the Swedish thinker’s ‘theory of correspondences’ is often interpreted as treating empirical realities as only imperfect manifestations of spiritual realities (e.g. Lamm 1915, Benz 1948, Beiser 2002). This interpretation that ascribes (Platonic) idealism to Swedenborg was originally proposed by Kant in the Dreams of a Spirit-Seer (1766). Although Kant criticizes Swedenborg’s theory, he considers it no inferior to the theories of Leibniz and Wolf, which can entice a reader of Swedenborg to take Kant’s interpretation at face value: even if Kant did not agree with Swedenborg, at least he took him ...


Cavendish And Berkeley On Inconceivability And Impossibility, Peter West, Colin Chamberlain 2020 Trinity College Dublin

Cavendish And Berkeley On Inconceivability And Impossibility, Peter West, Colin Chamberlain

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

In this paper, I compare Margaret Cavendish’s argument for the view that colours of objects are inseparable from their ‘physical’ qualities (such as size and shape) with George Berkeley’s argument for the view that secondary qualities of objects (such as colours, tastes, and sounds) are inseparable from their primary qualities (such as size and shape). By reconstructing their respective arguments, I show that both thinkers rely on the ‘inconceivability principle’: the claim that inconceivability entails impossibility. That is, both premise their arguments on the claim that it is impossible to conceive of an object that has size and ...


Day 2 Schedule, Benjamin Hill 2020 Western

Day 2 Schedule, Benjamin Hill

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

No abstract provided.


The Middle Standpoint In Spinoza’S Ethics, Raphael Krut-Landau, Kristin Primus 2020 University of Pennsylvania

The Middle Standpoint In Spinoza’S Ethics, Raphael Krut-Landau, Kristin Primus

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Spinoza’S Formal Essence, Christopher Martin 2020 University of Toledo

Spinoza’S Formal Essence, Christopher Martin

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

Spinoza stipulates in E2def2, his definition of the essence of a thing, that the essence of each particular can neither exist nor, even, be conceived, except alongside its particular. Yet a mere eight propositions later states that God maintains an idea of the essence of nonactual particulars “in the same way as the formal essences of the singular things are contained in God’s attributes” (E2p8). While there are known interpretive controversies with each of these claims, I argue that according to E2def2, essences of particulars can only be and can only be conceived alongside the actual existence of their ...


Informal Discussion, Benjamin Hill 2020 Western

Informal Discussion, Benjamin Hill

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

“Do your students struggle with Spinoza’s geometric exposition, and if so, how do you get them past it?”


Malebranche’S Alleged Idealism, Fabio Malfara, Dylan Flint 2020 Western

Malebranche’S Alleged Idealism, Fabio Malfara, Dylan Flint

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

Over the span of eleven years (1683-1694), Nicolas Malebranche and Antoine Arnauld, two prominent sympathizers of the Cartesian tradition, engaged in a rigorous debate. In his initial set of criticisms, Arnauld objects that a natural consequence of Malebranche’s theory of ideas is idealism.1 This charge of idealism has puzzled scholars: why did Arnauld believe this? Han Adriaenssen2 has convincingly argued that Arnauld’s charge of idealism is founded on the representationality of Malebranchean ideas. According to Arnauld, ideas represent for Malebranche in much the same way that portraits do—by inciting a perceiver to form a conception of ...


Descartes And The Monstrous Thesis, Evan Thomas, Zachary Agoff 2020 Ohio State

Descartes And The Monstrous Thesis, Evan Thomas, Zachary Agoff

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

No abstract provided.


The Ontological Status Of Cartesian Possibilia, Daniel Stermer, Marc Bobro, Liz Goodnick 2020 Florida State University

The Ontological Status Of Cartesian Possibilia, Daniel Stermer, Marc Bobro, Liz Goodnick

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

In this paper I present a novel view of the ontological status of possible objects for Descartes. Specifically, I claim that possible objects just are innate ideas considered objectively. In the act of creation, God creates possibilities—in all its richness—in the form of innate ideas. Thus, in acts of thinking, one may clearly and distinctly perceive, via one’s innate ideas, that such and such is possible. To argue this, I first analyze and critique two competing views—one from Calvin Normore who claims that innate ideas represent an independent realm of possibilia, and another from David Cunning ...


Day 1 Schedule, Benjamin Hill 2020 Western

Day 1 Schedule, Benjamin Hill

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Welcome And Introductory Remarks, Benjamin Hill 2020 Western

Welcome And Introductory Remarks, Benjamin Hill

Western E-Vent in Early Modern Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Hannah Arendt’S Vision Of Politics: Exemplary Negativities And The Ostjuden, Jacob E. Pearce 2020 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Hannah Arendt’S Vision Of Politics: Exemplary Negativities And The Ostjuden, Jacob E. Pearce

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Hannah Arendt’s vision of politics is one of the most enigmatic, perplexing, thoroughly analyzed, and potentially generative aspects of her philosophic corpus. It is marked by insightful analysis, cutting deconstructions of pressing moral issues, and confusing vernacular wherein her analytic boundaries, topics, and categories appear obfuscated. Although it has been observed that Arendt’s late-career theory of the political owes a debt to her earlier writings on Jewish history, including her Kantian-influenced theory of political judgment and storytelling, in this thesis I would like to narrow down this debt to a specific trope: The Ostjuden, or the imagined associations ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress