Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Epistemology Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

973 Full-Text Articles 627 Authors 346,504 Downloads 140 Institutions

All Articles in Epistemology

Faceted Search

973 full-text articles. Page 1 of 30.

What Documents Cannot Do: Revisiting Michael Polanyi And The Tacit Knowledge Dilemma, C. Sean Burns 2021 University of Kentucky

What Documents Cannot Do: Revisiting Michael Polanyi And The Tacit Knowledge Dilemma, C. Sean Burns

Information Science Faculty Publications

Our culture is dominated by digital documents in ways that are easy to overlook. These documents have changed our worldviews about science and have raised our expectations of them as tools for knowledge justification. This article explores the complexities surrounding the digital document by revisiting Michael Polanyi’s theory of tacit knowledge—the idea that “we can know more than we can tell.” The theory presents to us a dilemma: if we can know more than we can tell, then this means that the communication of science via the document as a primary form of telling will always be incomplete ...


A Glitch In The Matrix, John C. Lyden 2021 University of Nebraska-Omaha

A Glitch In The Matrix, John C. Lyden

Journal of Religion & Film

This is a film review of A Glitch in the Matrix (2021), directed by Rodney Ascher.


Automating Autism: Disability, Discourse, And Artificial Intelligence, Os Keyes 2020 University of Washington

Automating Autism: Disability, Discourse, And Artificial Intelligence, Os Keyes

The Journal of Sociotechnical Critique

As Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems shift to interact with new domains and populations, so does AI ethics: a relatively nascent subdiscipline that frequently concerns itself with questions of “fairness” and “accountability.” This fairness-centred approach has been criticized for (amongst other things) lacking the ability to address discursive, rather than distributional, injustices. In this paper I simultaneously validate these concerns, and work to correct the relative silence of both conventional and critical AI ethicists around disability, by exploring the narratives deployed by AI researchers in discussing and designing systems around autism. Demonstrating that these narratives frequently perpetuate a dangerously dehumanizing model ...


Structure, Neutrostructure, And Antistructure In Science, Florentin Smarandache 2020 University of New Mexico

Structure, Neutrostructure, And Antistructure In Science, Florentin Smarandache

Mathematics and Statistics Faculty and Staff Publications

In any science, a classical Theorem, defined on a given space, is a statement that is 100% true (i.e. true for all elements of the space). To prove that a classical theorem is false, it is sufficient to get a single counter-example where the statement is false. Therefore, the classical sciences do not leave room for partial truth of a theorem (or a statement). But, in our world and in our everyday life, we have many more examples of statements that are only partially true, than statements that are totally true. The NeutroTheorem and AntiTheorem are generalizations and alternatives ...


An Archaeology Of Contemporary Speculative Knowledge, Justas Patkauskas 2020 The University of Western Ontario

An Archaeology Of Contemporary Speculative Knowledge, Justas Patkauskas

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

This dissertation investigates contemporary speculative knowledge grounded in the immanence episteme, which is struggling to emerge as a foundation for a new kind of absolute knowledge. Regarding method, I use Michel Foucault’s concept of archaeology, situating archaeology in the context of deconstruction. In general, by delineating the various differences and genealogies within immanence theory, I show that immanence is neither a monolithic homogeneity nor a schizophrenic multiplicity but a coherent, if troubled, ground for speculative thought.

In Chapter 1, I define deconstruction as a broad philosophical project concerned with the order of knowledge and the University and its disciplines ...


Building Bridges: Epistemic Violence And Mother–Daughter Pedagogies From The U.S.–Mexico Border, Tanya J. Gaxiola Serrano, Elvia Serrano 2020 University of Texas at San Antonio

Building Bridges: Epistemic Violence And Mother–Daughter Pedagogies From The U.S.–Mexico Border, Tanya J. Gaxiola Serrano, Elvia Serrano

Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs

Living in the U.S.–Mexico borderlands, residents have intimately learned about the impact of the militarized policing of the physical border on their lives. While not often discussed, the policing transcends the border institution and targets the ways of knowing of People and Immigrants of Color. This essay features pláticas between two Mexican women educators from the border, la frontera, to challenge epistemic violence on the lives of U.S. Chicanas/Latinas. Intergenerational pedagogies of a mother–daughter dyad from the Tijuana–San Diego region serve as exemplars of the survival and resistance found in the borderlands. The narratives ...


Medieval Thinking In The 21st Century: Crystal Balls, Black Swans, And Darwin's Finches In The Time Of Corona, George Conesa 2020 Humboldt State University

Medieval Thinking In The 21st Century: Crystal Balls, Black Swans, And Darwin's Finches In The Time Of Corona, George Conesa

The International Journal of Ecopsychology (IJE)

Twenty years into the 21st Century, a sizable swath of the world populace thinks, makes decisions, and defines itself in a conflicted and contradictory chimera. Millions of individuals make use of cutting-edge technologies while simultaneously throwing salt over their shoulders and consulting with the local ‘healer’ about any number of illnesses--to caricaturize, a sort of medieval-thinker-tech-savvy orientation. It is here affirmed that the practical consequences of this agentic amalgamation, modes of thinking, and “being in the world” are counterproductive at best and self-defeating at worst, resulting in much uncertainty and leading to, for example, mixed messages in public health approaches ...


Propaganda And Its Role In Aesthetic Judgement And Artistic Knowledge: Looking At Kazuo Ishiguro’S Never Let Me Go, Rishabh Kumar 2020 Johns Hopkins University

Propaganda And Its Role In Aesthetic Judgement And Artistic Knowledge: Looking At Kazuo Ishiguro’S Never Let Me Go, Rishabh Kumar

The Macksey Journal

Critiquing any piece of art brings with it a plethora of epistemic anxieties - from the limitation of the individual experience to one's imbued cultural biases, so much so that any shared knowledge seems impossible, and the influence of the political inseparable. This paper explores Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, which situates and magnifies these anxieties in its dystopian portrayal of a near-future England - where cloned children are taught art in a rigorous and unidimensional means to make them accept their status in society as organ donors for the "real" citizens. It looks at how the children are ...


Racism Beyond Cognition: A Lacanian Psychoanalysis Of The United States' Terror Of And Intimacy With The Other, Johanna Jeung 2020 Kalamazoo College

Racism Beyond Cognition: A Lacanian Psychoanalysis Of The United States' Terror Of And Intimacy With The Other, Johanna Jeung

The Macksey Journal

Racism has traditionally been analyzed as a cognitive, epistemological problems: i.e. failed forms knowing about otherness. This masculinist methodology has denied embodied infrastructure, hystericizing symbolic parameters. This suppresses societal acknowledgement of our psychically submerged reality, which metatheoretically injures those less intimate with hegemonic privilege. Indeed, intrapsychic infrastructure is a primary way of signifying relationships of power and differentiation, including imperialist States and their subjects. I argue that epistemological approaches to otherness miss the central phenomenon: i.e. the conative matter of fantasy, anxiety, desire, and drive. Lacanian psychoanalysis understands fearing or idealizing otherness as a process of either “abjecting ...


Epistemic Injustice And Sexual Violence Intervention Advocacy, Jennifer Ware 2020 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Epistemic Injustice And Sexual Violence Intervention Advocacy, Jennifer Ware

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

In this project, I will explore how victims of sexual violence have faced epistemic injustices by reviewing the histories of two advocacy movements aimed at improving collective understanding of those experiences. In doing so, I will consider how those very activist movements may have introduced new epistemic lacunas and, even while successfully addressing some injustices, committed further epistemic wrongs as well. I will explore forms of hermeneutical resistance used by victims of sexual violence and their advocates. While these methods of resistance have been discussed elsewhere, I contribute to this ongoing work by applying these ideas to new examples. Finally ...


In Trump We Trust: Epistemic Isolation, Conflict Narratives, And Climate Change Denial In Significant Portion Of Trump’S 2016 Election Base, Alec Chapa 2020 Portland State University

In Trump We Trust: Epistemic Isolation, Conflict Narratives, And Climate Change Denial In Significant Portion Of Trump’S 2016 Election Base, Alec Chapa

The Macksey Journal

American political polarization around climate change is largely fueled by science denialism, and although much research investigates the impacts of ideology, little has been done on the impacts of epistemology, and more specifically, the role of conflict-conditioned narratives (CCN) in shaping epistemology. This study investigates the epistemic function of Fox News in the 2016 U.S. Election, potentially escalating conflict around climate change due to the nature of delivered narratives. Existing conflict resolution research is used as a theoretical grounding and for identifying the use of conflict narrative construction methods (CM) in online articles. This research uses a purposive approach ...


Using Lenses To Understand Policy Failures: The Case Of The 2012 Census In Chile, M. Angélica Pavez 2020 University of Massachusetts Boston

Using Lenses To Understand Policy Failures: The Case Of The 2012 Census In Chile, M. Angélica Pavez

Graduate Doctoral Dissertations

Policy failures are controversial, costly, and above all, messy. More often than we wish, what begins as a well-intentioned policy becomes a failure. In all countries and policy areas, some initiatives end up failing miserably, wasting resources, creating endless political struggles, and even affecting countries' governance. However, the perceptions and understanding of failure are dissimilar. Different actors, including researchers, have diverse and indeed conflicting viewpoints of what constitutes failure, its characteristics and avenues of resolution. The growing policy failure literature offers concepts and models to approach this elusive phenomenon, emphasizing the critical role of social perceptions, characteristics of failure episodes ...


Recognizing Mathematics Students As Creative: Mathematical Creativity As Community-Based And Possibility-Expanding, Meghan Riling 2020 Boston University

Recognizing Mathematics Students As Creative: Mathematical Creativity As Community-Based And Possibility-Expanding, Meghan Riling

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Although much creativity research has suggested that creativity is influenced by cultural and social factors, these have been minimally explored in the context of mathematics and mathematics learning. This problematically limits who is seen as mathematically creative and who can enter the discipline of mathematics. This paper proposes a framework of creativity that is based in what it means to know or do mathematics and accepts that creativity is something that can be nurtured in all students. Prominent mathematical epistemologies held since the beginning of the twentieth century in the Western mathematics tradition have different implications for promoting creativity in ...


The Crisis Of Communication In The Information Age: Revisiting C.P. Snow's Two Cultures In The Era Of Fake News, Aaron Green 2020 Compliance & Risks, Ltd.

The Crisis Of Communication In The Information Age: Revisiting C.P. Snow's Two Cultures In The Era Of Fake News, Aaron Green

Irish Communication Review

The purpose of this paper is to revisit C.P. Snow’s “Two Cultures” lecture in light of the cultural dominance of information technology. The crisis of communication in the information age, whether in fake news, political polarisation or science denial, has come about because both scientific and literary cultures, in seeking a world without entropy, have inadvertently stumbled upon a world without meaning. In order to explain how this has happened, the paper first explores Snow's challenge: to describe the second law of thermodynamics. The paper then provides a description of entropy that is neutral with regard to ...


Finding Commonality: The First Principles Of The Leadership Thought Of Theodore Roosevelt And Traditional Chinese Culture, Elizabeth Summerfield, Yumin Dai 2020 University of Melbourne, Australia

Finding Commonality: The First Principles Of The Leadership Thought Of Theodore Roosevelt And Traditional Chinese Culture, Elizabeth Summerfield, Yumin Dai

The Journal of Values-Based Leadership

This paper argues that, while the imperative to find global solutions to complex problems like climate change and resource management is agreed, dominant ethical and intellectual thought leadership in many western nations impedes progress. The Cartesian binaries of western post-Enlightenment culture tend instead toward oppositional binary divides where each ‘side’ assumes to be the whole and not a part. And the present and future similarly assume precedence over the past. The paper points to systems thinking as both a method and a practice of wise leadership of past western and eastern societies, including their conservation of natural resources. Two historical ...


The People Who “Burn”: “Communication,” Unity, And Change In Belarusian Discourse On Public Creativity, Anton Dinerstein 2020 University of Massachusetts Amherst

The People Who “Burn”: “Communication,” Unity, And Change In Belarusian Discourse On Public Creativity, Anton Dinerstein

Doctoral Dissertations

The main intellectual problem I address in this study is how everyday communication activates the relationship between creativity, conflict, and change. More specifically, I look at how the communication of creativity becomes a process of transformation, innovation, and change and how people are propelled to create through everyday communication practices in the face of conflict and opposition. To approach this problem, I use the case of communication in modern-day Belarus to show how creativity becomes a vehicle for and a source of new social and cultural routines among the independent grassroots communities and initiatives in Minsk.

On one level, I ...


Proper Scoring Rules In Epistemic Decision Theory, Maomei WANG 2020 Lingnan University

Proper Scoring Rules In Epistemic Decision Theory, Maomei Wang

Lingnan Theses and Dissertations

Epistemic decision theory (EpDT) aims to defend a variety of epistemic norms in terms of their facilitation of epistemic ends. One of the most important components of EpDT is known as a scoring rule (used to measure inaccuracies of credences). This thesis addresses some problems about scoring rules in EpDT. I consider scoring rules both for precise credences and for imprecise credences. For scoring rules in the context of precise credences, I examine the rationale for requiring a scoring rule to be strictly proper, and argue that no satisfactory justification has been given. I then investigate one possible response to ...


A Narrative Case Study Of Transfer Students In Instrumental Music Education, Ashley Glenn 2020 The University of Southern Mississippi

A Narrative Case Study Of Transfer Students In Instrumental Music Education, Ashley Glenn

Dissertations

Transfer students in music fields face challenges that are different from other fields of study. Research has shown that transfer students in music are expected to acclimate and operate as upperclassmen with minimal onboarding while also potentially having to retake courses they received credit for at the community college level. This study examines the experiences of five transfer students in music education through the lens of Schlossberg’s transition theory and Dewey’s model of transaction. Building on existing transfer student research, it asks: what do transfer students experience in terms of acceptance and self-integration, and how do these experiences ...


The Data City, The Idiom And Questions Of Locality, Noel Fitzpatrick 2020 Technological University Dublin

The Data City, The Idiom And Questions Of Locality, Noel Fitzpatrick

Articles

The paper aims to provide both a radical critique of the “smart city” as a techno-ideological apparatus,that through data analysis and algorithmic forms of governmentality tends to colonize space and time, and an attempt to reframe the very concept of intelligence within the smart cities. Two concepts are presented as tools for such a reframing: locality and idiom, where the first is conceived as openness of meaning generated by a territory, while the latter,analysed througha paradigmatic Irish example (Friel’s play Translations), prepares the ground for the pars construensof the paper. The claim, built by intertwining a set ...


The Scriptures And Culture: Examining The Skew Of Postmodern Christianity, Andrew J. Ondo 2020 John W. Rawlings School of Divinity, Liberty University

The Scriptures And Culture: Examining The Skew Of Postmodern Christianity, Andrew J. Ondo

Diligence: Journal of the Liberty University Online Religion Capstone in Research and Scholarship

Throughout history there have surely been detractors of truth and objectivity in the Christian faith, presenting at times subtly and at others with a profound transparency. Today, this issue has become one in which subtlety reigns supreme. As society hurdles onward into the postmodern era there is a continuing problem which arises from that same postmodern worldview, wherein the culturally accepted "good" is in and the biblically based truth is out. It seems that the old adage, "in like sin," could not ring any more accurately than in this present age. So, in order to make this clear, the provided ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress