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The Poetry Of Louise Glück: The Search For A Feminine Self Through The Lens Of Kristevan Psychoanalytic Feminist Literary Theory, Allison Cooke 2018 Presbyterian College

The Poetry Of Louise Glück: The Search For A Feminine Self Through The Lens Of Kristevan Psychoanalytic Feminist Literary Theory, Allison Cooke

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

This essay looks at the poetry of Louise Glück, specifically her two poems “Fugue” and “Persephone the Wanderer” from her 2006 collection Averno, for how the figures of the young woman/daughter and the mother struggle with and for their self-identity in relation to each other and to themselves. Drawing from the philosophy and literary theory of Jacques Derrida, Julia Kristeva, and Margaret Homans to develop the framing concepts of chora, potential capability, paralanguage, and the abject, this essay's argument suggests that these two feminine figures demonstrate difficult and traumatic transformations into what it means to be a woman ...


Education As Democratic Persuasion: Addressing Systemic Inequalities In Brettschneider's Value Democracy, Kyla L. Eastling 2018 Claremont Colleges

Education As Democratic Persuasion: Addressing Systemic Inequalities In Brettschneider's Value Democracy, Kyla L. Eastling

CMC Senior Theses

In Corey Brettschneider’s book, Democratic Rights: The Substance of Self- Government, he builds the value theory of democracy wherein procedural and substantive rights are both grounded in the core values of democracy. In his second book, When the State Speaks, What Should It Say? How Democracies Can Protect Expression and Promote Equality, Brettschneider elaborates on his theory to provide an account of how a liberal democracy can address hateful and discriminatory views. In response to both theories, critics have charged that the ideal value democracy does not sufficiently account for systemic inequalities that women and black citizens face. In ...


Unthinking Mastery: Dehumanism And Colonial Entanglements, Julietta Singh 2018 University of Richmond

Unthinking Mastery: Dehumanism And Colonial Entanglements, Julietta Singh

Bookshelf

In Unthinking Mastery Julietta Singh challenges a core, fraught dimension of geopolitical, cultural, and scholarly endeavor: the drive toward mastery over the self and others. Drawing on postcolonial theory, queer theory, new materialism, and animal studies, Singh traces how pervasive the concept of mastery has been to modern politics and anticolonial movements. She juxtaposes destructive uses of mastery, such as the colonial domination of bodies, against more laudable forms, such as intellectual and linguistic mastery, to underscore how the concept—regardless of its use—is rooted in histories of violence and the wielding of power. For anticolonial thinkers like Fanon ...


Sr. Sarah Grace: The Common Good, Caleb Wright 2018 Augustana College, Rock Island Illinois

Sr. Sarah Grace: The Common Good, Caleb Wright

Ask a Sister: Interview Wisdom from Catholic Women Religious

This paper includes part of an interview with Sr. Sarah Grace from January 2, 2018. She is a women religious who has worked in education for 25 years. This paper includes a portion of the interview where she shared her perspective on the common good.


Technology And Discrimination, D. E. Wittkower 2018 Old Dominion University

Technology And Discrimination, D. E. Wittkower

Philosophy Faculty Publications

This chapter develops a full theory of discriminatory technologies grounded in Heideggerian, Latourian, and Ihdean theoretical structures and demonstrates its applicability to a wide and widening range of forms of normativity, exclusion, and discrimination, taking place across intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, trans/cisgender identity, disability, and religious identity. Technologies, technical systems, and artifacts considered are wide-ranging, and include algorithms, adhesive bandages, human resource management policies, calendars, VR systems, carpentry, strollers, photographic film formulation and printing, video game character classes, and stairs.


Allocutio: Articulating The Task For The Future Of African Catholicism, Mary Sylvia Nwachukwu 2017 Godfrey Okoye University

Allocutio: Articulating The Task For The Future Of African Catholicism, Mary Sylvia Nwachukwu

Journal of Global Catholicism

This essay charts how Catholicism can become more indigenously African and respond better to African needs and concerns.


Is Utilitarianism Bad For Women?, H. E. Baber 2017 University of San Diego

Is Utilitarianism Bad For Women?, H. E. Baber

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

Abstract

Is Utilitarianism Bad for Women?

Philosophers and policy-makers concerned with the ethics, economics, and politics of development argue that the phenomenon of ‘adaptive preference’ makes preference-utilitarian measures of well-being untenable. Poor women in the Global South, they suggest, adapt to deprivation and oppression and may come to prefer states of affairs that are not conducive to flourishing. This critique, however, assumes a questionable understanding of preference utilitarianism and, more fundamentally, of the concept of preference that figures in such accounts.

If well-being is understood as preference-satisfaction it is easy to see why poor women in the Global South are ...


The Arrow Of Care Map: Abstract Care In Ideal Theory, Asha L. Bhandary 2017 University of Iowa

The Arrow Of Care Map: Abstract Care In Ideal Theory, Asha L. Bhandary

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This paper advances a framework to conceptualize societal care-giving arrangements abstractly. It is abstract in that it brackets the meaning of our particular relationships. This framework, which I call “the arrow of care map”, is a descriptive tracking model that is a necessary component of a theory of justice, but it is not a normative prescription in itself. The basic idea of the map is then multiply specifiable to track various ascriptive identity categories as well as different categories of care labor. In this way, the idea of the arrow of care map serves as a conceptual frame within which ...


Using Focus Groups To Explore The Underrepresentation Of Female-Identified Undergraduate Students In Philosophy, Claire A. Lockard, Helen Meskhidze, Sean Wilson, Nim Batchelor, Stephen Bloch-Schulman, Ann J. Cahill 2017 Elon University

Using Focus Groups To Explore The Underrepresentation Of Female-Identified Undergraduate Students In Philosophy, Claire A. Lockard, Helen Meskhidze, Sean Wilson, Nim Batchelor, Stephen Bloch-Schulman, Ann J. Cahill

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This paper is part of a larger project designed to examine and ameliorate the underrepresentation of female-identified students in the philosophy department at Elon University. The larger project involved a variety of research methods, including statistical analysis of extant registration and grade distribution data from our department as well as the administration of multiple surveys. Here, we provide a description and analysis of one aspect of our research: focus groups. We ran three focus groups of female-identified undergraduate students: one group consisted of students who had taken more than one philosophy class, one consisted of students who had taken only ...


Resisting Body Oppression: An Aesthetic Approach, Sherri Irvin 2017 University of Oklahoma

Resisting Body Oppression: An Aesthetic Approach, Sherri Irvin

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This article argues for an aesthetic approach to resisting oppression based on judgments of bodily unattractiveness. Philosophical theories have often suggested that appropriate aesthetic judgments should converge on sets of objects consensually found to be beautiful or ugly. The convergence of judgments about human bodies, however, is a significant source of injustice, because people judged to be unattractive pay substantial social and economic penalties in domains such as education, employment and criminal justice. The injustice is compounded by the interaction between standards of attractiveness and gender, race, disability, and gender identity.

I argue that we should actively work to reduce ...


Not One, Not Two: Toward An Ontology Of Pregnancy, Maja Sidzinska 2017 San Francisco State University

Not One, Not Two: Toward An Ontology Of Pregnancy, Maja Sidzinska

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

Basic understandings of subjectivity are derived from principles of masculine embodiment such as discreteness. But pregnancy challenges such understandings because it represents a sort of splitting of the body. In the pregnant situation, a subject may experience herself as both herself and an other, as well as neither herself nor an other. This is logically untenable—an impossibility. If our discourse depends on discrete referents, then what paradigms of identity are available to the pregnant subject? What could be the pregnant subject's ontology?

Eric Bapteste and John Dupré offer the idea that organisms are processual beings. In their view ...


Credibility Excess And The Social Imaginary In Cases Of Sexual Assault, Audrey S. Yap 2017 University of Victoria

Credibility Excess And The Social Imaginary In Cases Of Sexual Assault, Audrey S. Yap

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This paper will connect literature on epistemic injustice with literature on victims and perpetrators, to argue that in addition to considering the credibility deficit suffered by many victims, we should also consider the credibility excess accorded to many perpetrators. Epistemic injustice, as discussed by Miranda Fricker, considers ways in which someone might be wronged in their capacity as a knower. Testimonial injustice occurs when there is a credibility deficit as a result of identity-prejudicial stereotypes. However, criticisms of Fricker have pointed out that credibility is part of a more complex system that includes both deficits and excesses. I will use ...


Are Second Person Needs ‘Burdened Virtues’?: Exploring The Risks And Rewards Of Caring, Katharine L. Wolfe 2017 St. Lawrence University

Are Second Person Needs ‘Burdened Virtues’?: Exploring The Risks And Rewards Of Caring, Katharine L. Wolfe

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This essay contributes to the ethics of vulnerability and to the tradition of feminist care ethics by introducing the notion of second-person needs. Employing the work of Annette Baier, who argues that we are all ‘second persons’ insofar as personhood arises through a childhood in the care of others, it draws attention to the needs that are illuminated when we approach ourselves and others as second persons, and makes a case for the moral import of second-person needs. In drawing from and critically responding to Lisa Tessman’s concept of ‘burdened virtues,’ it also adds to a growing field of ...


Dismantling Purity: Toward A Feminist Curdling Of Hawaiian Identity, L Brooke Rudow-Abouharb 2017 University of Georgia

Dismantling Purity: Toward A Feminist Curdling Of Hawaiian Identity, L Brooke Rudow-Abouharb

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This paper explores Hawaiian racial identity formation using María Lugones’s metaphor of curdling as a guiding theme. I aim to show that the accepted definition of “native Hawaiian” is based on a purity model of race that serves to undermine the unity of the Hawaiian Nation. I begin by outlining the pre-contact understanding of Hawaiian identity. This conception of identity was subsequently altered through various political agendas to fit within a Western/European notion of “pure” racial identity. I argue that continuing to use the imposed definition of “native Hawaiian” makes the fragmentation of Hawaiian identity and society difficult ...


Hermeneutical Injustice And The Problem Of Authority, Komarine Romdenh-Romluc 2017 University of Sheffield

Hermeneutical Injustice And The Problem Of Authority, Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

Miranda Fricker (2008) identifies a wrong she calls ‘hermeneutical injustice’. A culture’s hermeneutical resources are the shared meanings its members use to understand their experience, and communicate this understanding to others. Cultures tend to be composed of different social groups that are organised hierarchically. As a consequence of these uneven power relations, the culture’s shared meanings often reflect the lives of its more powerful members, and fail to properly capture the experiences of the less powerful. This may result in members of less powerful groups being harmed. Such disadvantage constitutes, for Fricker, hermeneutical injustice. In this paper, I ...


Objectivity, Diversity, And Uptake: On The Status Of Women In Philosophy, Michelle Ciurria 2017 Practical Justice Initiative, the University of New South Wales

Objectivity, Diversity, And Uptake: On The Status Of Women In Philosophy, Michelle Ciurria

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This paper argues that diversity and uptake are required for objectivity. In philosophy, women are underrepresented with respect to teaching, publishing, and citations. This undermines the objectivity of our research output. To improve women’s representation and objectivity in philosophy, we should take steps to increase women’s numbers and institute uptake-conducive conditions. In concrete terms, this means fostering an appreciation for diversity, diversifying evaluators, integrating women’s contributions into mainstream discourse, and reducing implicit bias.


From Feminist Activist To Abortion Barbie: A Rhetorical History Of Abortion Discourse From 2013-2016, Skye de Saint Felix 2017 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

From Feminist Activist To Abortion Barbie: A Rhetorical History Of Abortion Discourse From 2013-2016, Skye De Saint Felix

Theses and Dissertations

This thesis provides a rhetorical history of abortion discourse with an emphasis on the rhetorical moment from 2013-2016. To uncover the rhetorical strategies used to shape consensus on abortion, I highlight three major events—Senator Wendy Davis’s (D-Fort Worth) notorious 13-hour filibuster against Texas’s HB2, the conservative capture of Davis as Abortion Barbie, and the Supreme Court case, Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt (2016). Because of these key rhetorical moments, pro-choice and anti-choice publics cultivated a period of heightened tension that reinvigorated abortion debates. While pro-choice groups employed narrative to centralize women as rhetorical agents and open ...


Critical Ethics: Witnessing Otherness In La Última Niebla, Christine Garst-Santos 2017 South Dakota State University

Critical Ethics: Witnessing Otherness In La Última Niebla, Christine Garst-Santos

Christine Garst-Santos

La última niebla [The Final Mist] (1935) by María Luisa Bombal presents a female protagonist traumatized by the restrictive gender norms of 1930s Argentina. One would expect that the protagonist’s increasing alienation throughout the novel and her ultimate surrender to an identity that she loathes would generate a compassionate response from readers. However, the text has generated a significant body of notably unsympathetic—and even censorious—criticism from scholars. In an effort to analyze why Bombal’s novel and the protagonist’s performance have been problematic for critics, I turn from literary theory to philosophy. By combining Richard Rorty ...


Introduction: Symposium On Toward A Feminist Theory Of The State, Twenty-Five Years Later, Lori Watson 2017 University of San Diego

Introduction: Symposium On Toward A Feminist Theory Of The State, Twenty-Five Years Later, Lori Watson

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This paper introduces the peer-reviewed “Symposium on Toward a Feminist Theory of the State, Twenty-Five Years Later.” In these essays in honor of the work of Catharine MacKinnon, edited by Lori Watson, the authors attend primarily to MacKinnon’s book, critically reflecting on it and connecting it with recent scholarship. This symposium is in part the outcome of the set of papers emerging from the Book Symposium at the Pacific Division meeting of the American Philosophical Association, held Saturday, April 4, 2015: “Catharine MacKinnon, Toward a Feminist Theory of the State: 25 Years Later.”


'We Must Find Words Or Burn': Speaking Out Against Disciplinary Silencing, Susan J. Brison 2017 Dartmouth College

'We Must Find Words Or Burn': Speaking Out Against Disciplinary Silencing, Susan J. Brison

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

Susan J. Brison’s paper illustrates, with the use of a first-person narrative, how Catharine MacKinnon’s work reveals the role of silencing in the construction of the disciplinary reality of philosophy.


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