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The Search For Certainty: A Pragmatist Critique Of Society’S Focus On Biological Childbearing, Jamie P. Ross 2017 Portland State University

The Search For Certainty: A Pragmatist Critique Of Society’S Focus On Biological Childbearing, Jamie P. Ross

Jamie P Ross

The Search for Certainty: A Pragmatist Critique of Society’s Focus on Biological Childbearing Abstract I suggest that a form of biological determinism rests on what philosopher John Dewey calls a misplaced “search for certainty.” This search is a process whereby a constructed desire is normalized within a cultural context and naturalized in the body in a manner that substantiates the desire as predictable. Predictability, therefore, justifies a biological basis of desire. In this paper I focus specifically on a desire to bear or produce a biological child: a desire that becomes predictable within a medical model of emotion based ...


Introduction To The Challenge Of Epistemic Responsibility: Essays In Honour Of Lorraine Code, Anna Mudde 2016 Campion College at University of Regina

Introduction To The Challenge Of Epistemic Responsibility: Essays In Honour Of Lorraine Code, Anna Mudde

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This paper introduces The Challenge of Epistemic Responsibility: Essays in Honour of Lorraine Code. In this symposium of papers, invited by Feminist Philosophy Quarterly, the authors return to Code’s first book, Epistemic Responsibility (1987), to re-read it, respond to it, and rethink Code’s articulation of epistemic responsibility anew, considering it in light of her other work and drawing it into contact with their own. This symposium is the outcome of a conference panel that Anna Mudde co-organized with Susan Dieleman, held October 25, 2015, at the annual meeting of the Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy (CSWIP) at ...


Allied Identities, Kurt M. Blankschaen 2016 Boston University

Allied Identities, Kurt M. Blankschaen

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

Allies are extremely important to LGBT rights. Though we don’t often enumerate what tasks we expect allies to do, a fairly common conception is that allies “support the LGBT community.” In the first section I introduce three difficulties for this position that collectively suggest it is conceptually insufficient. I then develop a positive account by starting with whom allies are allied to instead of what allies are supposed to do. We might obviously say here that allies are allied to the LGBT community, but I will argue that this community is better thought of as a loose coalition because ...


Love And Resistance: Moral Solidarity In The Face Of Perceptual Failure, Barrett Emerick 2016 St. Mary's College of Maryland

Love And Resistance: Moral Solidarity In The Face Of Perceptual Failure, Barrett Emerick

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

In this paper I explore how we ought to respond to the problematic inner lives of those that we love. I argue for an understanding of love that is radical and challenging—a powerful form of resistance within the confines of everyday relationships. I argue that love, far from the platitudinous and saccharine view, does not call for our acceptance of others’ failings. Instead, loving another means believing in their potential to grow and holding them to account when they fail. I argue that loving others means meeting them where they are and working to understand the role that oppressive ...


Unhappy Confessions: The Temptation Of Admitting To White Privilege, Claire A. Lockard 2016 Elon University

Unhappy Confessions: The Temptation Of Admitting To White Privilege, Claire A. Lockard

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

Admissions of white privilege and/or racism are common among white anti-racists and others who want to combat their racism. In this article, I argue that because such admissions are conscious attempts to address unconscious habits, they are unhappy speech acts and contrary to their implied aims. Admissions of white privilege or racism can be conceptualized as Foucauldian confessions that are pleasurable to enact but ultimately reinforce white people’s feelings of goodness and allow them to avoid addressing this racism. I ground my argument in Shannon Sullivan’s analysis of white privilege and Sara Ahmed’s critique of confessions ...


The Epistemological And The Moral/Political In Epistemic Responsibility: Beginnings And Reworkings In Lorraine Code’S Work, Christine M. Koggel 2016 Carleton University

The Epistemological And The Moral/Political In Epistemic Responsibility: Beginnings And Reworkings In Lorraine Code’S Work, Christine M. Koggel

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This is the first paper in the invited collection. Koggel starts with Code’s first book to record the key objections she raises against traditional and mainstream epistemological accounts. They are the sort of objections that will thread their way through all her work and be important to the development of feminist epistemology. I will then introduce, summarize, and discuss the work Code does on virtue ethics in Epistemic Responsibility and speculate on why she abandons this path in the rest of her work. Code uses virtue ethics and, specifically, virtues of the intellect, to frame an account of moral ...


Knowing Responsibly, Thinking Ecologically: Response To Panelists, Lorraine Code PhD DLitt FRSC 2016 York University

Knowing Responsibly, Thinking Ecologically: Response To Panelists, Lorraine Code Phd Dlitt Frsc

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

In this final paper in the invited collection, Lorraine Code responds to panelists and provides background and reflections on her work.


Responsibilism And The Analytic-Sociological Debate In Social Epistemology, Susan Dieleman 2016 University of Saskatchewan

Responsibilism And The Analytic-Sociological Debate In Social Epistemology, Susan Dieleman

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This is the second paper in the invited collection. Dieleman provides an overview of the “state-of-the-field” debate between Analytic Social Epistemology (ASE), represented by Alvin Goldman, and what Dieleman calls the Sociological Social Epistemology (SSE), represented by Steve Fuller. In response to this ongoing debate, this paper has two related and complementary objectives. The first is to show that the debate between analytic and sociological versions of social epistemology is overly simplistic and doesn’t take into account additional positions that are available and, indeed, have been available since social epistemology was (re)introduced in the mid to late 1980s ...


From Epistemic Responsibility To Ecological Thinking: The Importance Of Advocacy For Epistemic Community, Catherine Maloney 2016 York University

From Epistemic Responsibility To Ecological Thinking: The Importance Of Advocacy For Epistemic Community, Catherine Maloney

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This is the third paper in the invited collection. Maloney highlights commonalities and divergences between two of Code’s works, Epistemic Responsibility (1987) and Ecological Thinking: The Politics of Epistemic Location (2006), focussing on three concepts: epistemic responsibility, which is central and common across both works; cognitive interdependence which is common to both works, but undergoes a major transformation in Ecological Thinking; and advocacy, which is entirely absent from the discussion in Epistemic Responsibility. Code’s work intersects with aspects of the work of two other thinkers—Miranda Fricker’s hermeneutic injustice and Mikhail Bakhtin’s creative understanding. Advocacy as ...


Fierce Love: What We Can Learn About Epistemic Responsibility From Histories Of Aids Advocacy, Alexis Shotwell 2016 Carleton University

Fierce Love: What We Can Learn About Epistemic Responsibility From Histories Of Aids Advocacy, Alexis Shotwell

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

This is the fourth paper in the invited collection. Shotwell examines the work of direct-action activists as forms of medical activism that express a non-reductionist and complex intersectional science and technology practice, bridging lay and professional medical contexts. Shotwell draws on Lorraine Code’s generative theory of the importance of “ecological thinking” as one way to practice what she calls “epistemic responsibility,” and to think about the varied and complex early responses of activists in Canada to AIDS. Activists made wide-ranging, theoretically sophisticated, and socially significant interventions in how AIDS manifested in Canada; their interventions manifested a kind of political ...


The Consequences Of Narrative, Kylie Mosbacher 2016 Humboldt State University

The Consequences Of Narrative, Kylie Mosbacher

ideaFest: Interdisciplinary Journal of Creative Works and Research from Humboldt State University

No abstract provided.


Virtue’S Web: The Virtue Of Empathic Attunement And The Need For A Relational Foundation, Georgina D. Campelia 2016 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Virtue’S Web: The Virtue Of Empathic Attunement And The Need For A Relational Foundation, Georgina D. Campelia

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation focuses on two questions. First, is empathy a virtue? Second, if it is, then why is it neglected, even ostracized, in contemporary discourses on virtue? In response to the first question, this dissertation develops and defends a distinction between empathic practices and moral excellence in those practices, which is termed ‘empathic attunement’. This excellence is a virtue not because of its connection to standard altruistic behavior, but because it is a unique way of caring for, respecting, and understanding others’ emotional experiences in response to the need to be emotionally understood and the good of being emotionally understood ...


Contributors To Indian Catholicism: Interventions And Imaginings, Mathew Schmalz 2016 College of the Holy Cross

Contributors To Indian Catholicism: Interventions And Imaginings, Mathew Schmalz

Journal of Global Catholicism

Contributors to Indian Catholicism: Interventions and Imaginings, the inaugural issue of the Journal of Global Catholicism.


The Tying Of The Ceremonial Wedding Thread: A Feminist Analysis Of “Ritual” And “Tradition” Among Syro-Malabar Catholics In India, Sonja Thomas 2016 Colby College

The Tying Of The Ceremonial Wedding Thread: A Feminist Analysis Of “Ritual” And “Tradition” Among Syro-Malabar Catholics In India, Sonja Thomas

Journal of Global Catholicism

This article presents a feminist analysis of patriarchy persisting in Catholicism of the Syro-Malabar rite in Kerala. The article specifically considers the impact of charismatic Catholicism on women of the Syro-Malabar rite and argues that it is important to interrogate this new face of religiosity in order to fully understand how certain rituals are allowed to change and be fluid, while others, especially concerning female sexuality, are enshrined as “tradition” which often restricts the parameters for women’s empowerment and may reinforce caste and patriarchal hegemonies preventing feminist solidarity across different religious- and caste-based groups.


Troubles At Coal Creek: Rhetorics Of Writing, Research, And The Archive, Sumner Stevenson Brown 2016 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Troubles At Coal Creek: Rhetorics Of Writing, Research, And The Archive, Sumner Stevenson Brown

Masters Theses

Digging through the past can uncover painful truths. As such, historiography that does not acknowledge negotiated spaces, cultural erasures, and flexible frameworks may fall short. It may limit both breadth and depth of the past, thereby (re)producing erasures, whereas a reflexive theoretical framework delivers not only depth and breadth, but it also adds texture and dimension to historical writing and research processes. It is for these purposes that the value of alternative methodologies is not situated at the margins of the rhetorical canons. Instead, it is embedded in the very core of the canons, defined as an element that ...


Acknowledging Our Referees From September 2014 Through June 2016, Student Assistants, Editors FPQ 2016 Western University

Acknowledging Our Referees From September 2014 Through June 2016, Student Assistants, Editors Fpq

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

The editors express sincere gratitude to all those who have refereed for Feminist Philosophy Quarterly between September 2014 and June 2016.


Moral Failure — Response To Critics, Lisa Tessman 2016 Binghamton University

Moral Failure — Response To Critics, Lisa Tessman

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

I briefly introduce Moral Failure as a book that brings together philosophical and empirical work in moral psychology to examine moral requirements that are non-negotiable and that contravene the principle that “ought implies can.” I respond to Rivera by arguing that the process of construction that imbues normative requirements with authority need not systematize or eliminate conflicts between normative requirements. My response to Schwartzman clarifies what is problematic about nonideal theorizing that limits itself to offering action-guidance. In response to Kittay, I defend my rejection of “ought implies can,” and consider the implications of the concept of unfair moral requirements.


Possible Dilemmas Raised By Impossible Moral Requirements, Lisa Rivera 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

Possible Dilemmas Raised By Impossible Moral Requirements, Lisa Rivera

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

The priority that Tessman’s argument gives to phenomenological and neuropsychological explanations of moral requirements entails a fundamental shift in our understanding of these. Two central problems of normative theory come together in Tessman’s account. The first arises when an agent’s sense of requirement clashes with what a systematic theory prescribes. The second arises when neuropsychological accounts fail to fit the prescription. Tessman argues that no account successfully resolves moral dilemmas such that ought always implies can, and she argues that neuropsychology explains our sense of impossible requirements. This explanation eliminates the role of a prescriptive theory in ...


Action-Guidance, Oppression, And Nonideal Theory, Lisa H. Schwartzman 2016 Michigan State University

Action-Guidance, Oppression, And Nonideal Theory, Lisa H. Schwartzman

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

Lisa Tessman’s Moral Failure: On the Impossible Demands of Morality raises important questions about ideal theory, oppression, and the role of action guidance in normative philosophy. After a brief overview of feminist and anti-racist philosophers’ critiques of ideal theory, I examine Tessman’s claim that nonideal oppression theorists focus too narrowly on action guidance and thereby obscure other important normative issues, such as the problem of moral failure. Although I agree with Tessman’s advocacy of a wider focus—and with her suggestion that situations of inevitable moral failure are particularly important to examine in contexts of oppression—I ...


Two Dogmas Of Moral Theory? Comments On Lisa Tessman’S Moral Failure, Eva F. Kittay 2016 Stony Brook University

Two Dogmas Of Moral Theory? Comments On Lisa Tessman’S Moral Failure, Eva F. Kittay

Feminist Philosophy Quarterly

In Moral Failure, Lisa Tessman argues against two principles of moral theory, that ought implies can and that normative theory must be action-guiding. Although Tessman provides a trenchant account of how we are thrust into the misfortune of moral failure, often by our very efforts to act morally, and although she shows, through a discussion well-informed by the latest theorizing in ethics, neuroethics, and psychology, how much more moral theory can do than provide action-guiding principles, I argue that the two theses of moral theory that she disputes remain indispensable for ethical theory.


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