Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Ethics and Political Philosophy Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

4,283 Full-Text Articles 2,627 Authors 1,359,159 Downloads 207 Institutions

All Articles in Ethics and Political Philosophy

Faceted Search

4,283 full-text articles. Page 1 of 125.

Toward A Feminist Ethics Of Nonviolence [Toc], Timothy J. Huzar, Clare Woodford 2021 Fordham University

Toward A Feminist Ethics Of Nonviolence [Toc], Timothy J. Huzar, Clare Woodford

Philosophy

Edited collection of original essays debating Adriana Cavarero’s feminist ethics of nonviolence. Including an original essay by Adriana Cavarero and responses from Judith Butler, Bonnie Honig, Olivia Guaraldo, Simona Forti, Christine Battersby, Lorenzo Bernini, Mark Devenney, Tim Huzar and Clare Woodford. Although inspired by Cavarero’s recent work on an ethical maternal posture of inclination the responses situate Cavarero’s argument in her wider corpus of nonviolence and uniqueness, that critiques and offers an alternative to the masculine symbolic of philosophy. This introduction endeavours to not only introduce Cavarero’s work, but to chart the journey of an increasingly ...


Infrapolitical Passages: Global Turmoil, Narco-Accumulation, And The Post-Sovereign State [Toc], Gareth Williams 2020 Fordham University

Infrapolitical Passages: Global Turmoil, Narco-Accumulation, And The Post-Sovereign State [Toc], Gareth Williams

Literature

This book proposes to clear a way through some of the dominant political determinations and violent symptoms of contemporary globalization. It does this in in order to make a case for “infrapolitics” as an enactment of intellectual responsibility in the face of a tumultuous world of war and of technological value extraction on a planetary scale. In Infrapolitical Passages the politics of contemporary global capital is a race to the bottom of reason itself, extended in the wake of the subordination of all forms of living to the economized relation between means and ends. It is this relation which, thanks ...


Disabilities And Capabilities: A Challenge To Martha Nussbaum's Central Capabilities, Helen Witte 2020 Bergen Community College

Disabilities And Capabilities: A Challenge To Martha Nussbaum's Central Capabilities, Helen Witte

The Macksey Journal

Philosopher Martha Nussbaum, in her book "Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach" (2011), asserts that all humans should be granted ten fundamental entitlements, which are the components necessary for a person to have a flourishing and satisfying life. Although her requirements are fairly broad in scope, her entitlements- such as the ability to experience emotions and to have a normal lifespan- raise some questions regarding whether they apply to all people. More specifically, how do these capabilities relate to people with disabilities? In the chapter, “Capabilities and Contemporary Issues,” Nussbaum proclaims that the “problem of disability is vast” (151). Why ...


The Political Animal: Political Naturalism And Moral Deliberation In Aristotle’S Politics, Joseph I. Rodriguez 2020 University of California, Berkeley

The Political Animal: Political Naturalism And Moral Deliberation In Aristotle’S Politics, Joseph I. Rodriguez

The Macksey Journal

In this paper, I argue that Aristotle’s conception of the polis as natural derives from the specifically human kind of partnership that is tied to the exercise of the specifically human capacity for logos. I argue that Aristotle’s political naturalism is rooted in two claims: (a) the claim that humans are the most political animal and (b) the claim that the polis is naturally prior to the individual. Together these two claims constitute Aristotle’s argument that the polis alone has the potential to fully satisfy our unique human capacity for logos. As I see it, Aristotle thinks ...


When Some Animals Are More Equal Than Others, Steve Clarke 2020 University of Oxford

When Some Animals Are More Equal Than Others, Steve Clarke

Animal Sentience

Mikhalevich & Powell (2020) argue that we should attribute moral standing not only to vertebrates but also to certain invertebrates. M&P also object on ethical grounds to policies of scientific funding agencies that encourage scientists to replace vertebrates by invertebrates in research. M&P do allow that some invertebrates with brains may have lower levels of moral status than some vertebrates, but this seems to conflict with their case against replacement policies.


Consider The Agent In The Arthropod, Nicolas Delon, Peter Cook, Gordon Bauer, Heidi Harley 2020 New College of Florida

Consider The Agent In The Arthropod, Nicolas Delon, Peter Cook, Gordon Bauer, Heidi Harley

Animal Sentience

Whether or not arthropods are sentient, they can have moral standing. Appeals to sentience are not necessary and retard progress in human treatment of other species, including invertebrates. Other increasingly well-documented aspects of invertebrate minds are pertinent to their welfare. Even if arthropods are not sentient, they can be agents whose goals—and therefore interests—can be frustrated. This kind of agency is sufficient for moral status and requires that we consider their welfare.


Respect And The Mengzian Conception Of Yi As A Rule-Related Virtue, Meng ZHANG 2020 San Jose State University

Respect And The Mengzian Conception Of Yi As A Rule-Related Virtue, Meng Zhang

Comparative Philosophy

This paper focuses on Meng Zi’s idea of yi () as a virtue. In it, I first briefly examine two influential interpretations of yi – the “appropriateness” approach that views yi as a disposition to do what is fitting in a given situation and the shame-centered approach that understands yi as a disposition to avoid what is shameful in the moral life. The first approach is too thin to distinguish yi from acting properly in general and the second reading confines the definitive feeling involved in yi to a too moralized understanding of shame. Moreover, both fail to pay enough ...


Capitalism And Biblical Ethics, Sarah D. Stewart 2020 Liberty University

Capitalism And Biblical Ethics, Sarah D. Stewart

Liberty University Journal of Statesmanship & Public Policy

There has been a growing trend in some expressions of Christianity to view Capitalism as fundamentally incompatible with the Christian faith. This article looked to a variety of sources to argue that Christianity and Capitalism are not fundamentally incompatible. Rather, Capitalism developed alongside developments in Christian theology during the Middle Ages. This traditional form of Capitalism is defined and argued for in this article. The article attempts to demonstrate that the elements that allow Capitalism to thrive are compatible with Christian ethics. The case is made by first examining the historical development of Capitalism and its relationship to Christianity. From ...


The Ekklesia As An Assembly That Invokes Response, Tara Caudle 2020 Liberty University

The Ekklesia As An Assembly That Invokes Response, Tara Caudle

Liberty University Journal of Statesmanship & Public Policy

The ekklesia is often translated as “church” and divided between a sacred and secular definition. However, this translation and separation loses the significance and nuances of the term. The etymology of the word renders the ekklesia as an assembly of those who have been called out. The Greek usage of the word presents the ekkelsia as a political phenomenon in which the ekkelsia is an assembly that gathers to benefit the common good of the entire polis. Biblically, the ekkelsia is often understood as an assembly of those who have been called by God and has a spiritual, relational, geographical ...


De Libero Conscientia: Martin Luther’S Rediscovery Of Liberty Of Conscience And Its Synthesis Of The Ancients And The Influence Of The Moderns, Bessie S. Blackburn 2020 Liberty University

De Libero Conscientia: Martin Luther’S Rediscovery Of Liberty Of Conscience And Its Synthesis Of The Ancients And The Influence Of The Moderns, Bessie S. Blackburn

Liberty University Journal of Statesmanship & Public Policy

One fateful day on March 26, 1521, a lowly Augustinian monk was cited to appear before the Diet of Worms.[1] His habit trailed behind him as he braced for the questioning. He was firm, yet troubled. He boldly proclaimed: “If I am not convinced by proofs from Scripture, or clear theological reasons, I remain convinced by the passages which I have quoted from Scripture, and my conscience is held captive by the Word of God. I cannot and will not retract, for it is neither prudent nor right to go against one’s conscience. So help me God, Amen ...


Alternate Warfare: The Unseen Weapons Of Mass Destruction, Elyse Keener 2020 Liberty University

Alternate Warfare: The Unseen Weapons Of Mass Destruction, Elyse Keener

Liberty University Journal of Statesmanship & Public Policy

Biological warfare is a national security concern that transcends centuries. In the current international climate, biowarfare is of particular interest due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This article seeks to follow historical cases of biological warfare and international response to these cases in order to understand the implications of COVID-19, if it were to be weaponized. Also covered is the current capabilities that Russia, China, and Iran are assessed to possess.


Biblical Principles Of Government And Criminal Justice, Kahlib J. Fischer 2020 Liberty University

Biblical Principles Of Government And Criminal Justice, Kahlib J. Fischer

Liberty University Journal of Statesmanship & Public Policy

This article formulates a Biblical perspective on government, public policy, and criminal justice. It does so emphasizing themes of covenant, justice, inalienable rights, and proper boundaries and cooperation between Church and State, and other spheres of sovereignty within a society. These themes are predicated upon central tenants of Scripture--the sovereignty of God, the imago dei of all humans, and the and the centrality of the Gospel.


Philosophy 21: Moral Problems - Oer Course Syllabus, Lou Matz 2020 University of the Pacific

Philosophy 21: Moral Problems - Oer Course Syllabus, Lou Matz

Pacific Open Texts

Course Syllabus for an OER / Open Access version of PHIL 21: Moral Problems at University of the Pacific during Summer 2020.


Do Beetles Have Experiences? How Can We Tell?, Matt Cartmill 2020 Boston University

Do Beetles Have Experiences? How Can We Tell?, Matt Cartmill

Animal Sentience

We attribute consciousness to other humans because their anatomy and behavior resembles our own and their verbal descriptions of subjective experiences correspond to ours. Nonhuman mammals have somewhat humanlike behavior and anatomy, but without the verbal descriptions. Their sentience is therefore open to Cartesian doubt. Robot "minds" lack humanlike behavior and anatomy, and so their sentience is generally discounted no matter what sentences they generate. Invertebrates lack both neurological similarity and language. Although it may be safest in making moral judgments to assume that some invertebrates are sentient, cogent reasons for thinking so must await an objective causal explanation for ...


Spineless And Sentient: A Challenge For Moral Comparison, Patrick Forber, Robert C. Jones 2020 Tufts University

Spineless And Sentient: A Challenge For Moral Comparison, Patrick Forber, Robert C. Jones

Animal Sentience

We agree with Mikhalevich & Powell but take issue with their criteria for attributing sentience. This problem is connected with difficult issues concerning moral comparisons and evaluating moral decisions when interspecific moral interests conflict.


Avoiding Anthropocentrism In Evolutionarily Inclusive Ethics, Simon Fitzpatrick 2020 John Carroll University

Avoiding Anthropocentrism In Evolutionarily Inclusive Ethics, Simon Fitzpatrick

Animal Sentience

Mikhalevich & Powell are to be commended for challenging the “invertebrate dogma” that invertebrates are unworthy of ethical concern. However, developing an evolutionarily inclusive ethics requires facing some of the more radical implications of rejecting hierarchical scala naturae and human-centered conceptions of the biological world. In particular, we need to question the anthropocentric assumptions that still linger in discussions like these.


Zones Of Precaution, Jonathan Birch 2020 London School of Economics and Political Science

Zones Of Precaution, Jonathan Birch

Animal Sentience

My commentary focusses on Mikhalevich & Powell’s criticisms of the Animal Sentience Precautionary Principle. I emphasize the pragmatic nature of my rationale for proposing that, rather than extending the scope of animal welfare protection on a species-by-species basis, we should be willing to protect entire Linnaean orders on the basis of evidence from a single species.


Brain Complexity, Sentience And Welfare, Donald M. Broom 2020 University of Cambridge

Brain Complexity, Sentience And Welfare, Donald M. Broom

Animal Sentience

Neither sentience nor moral standing is confined to animals with large or human-like brains. Invertebrates deserve moral consideration. Definition of terms clarifies the relationship between sentience and welfare. All animals have welfare but humans give more protection to sentient animals. Humans should be less human-centred.


Invertebrate Cognition, Sentience And Biology, Georges Chapouthier 2020 CNRS, Paris

Invertebrate Cognition, Sentience And Biology, Georges Chapouthier

Animal Sentience

All animal species have adapted for survival and no species is superior overall. For cognitive capacities and sentience, invertebrates such as the octopus, although quite unlike vertebrates, can achieve similar performance levels. So can other invertebrates with small brains; hence they too, as sentient beings, deserve moral consideration from humans. How are we to identify these species? Only though a detailed analysis of their behavior. The decision, which is a moral judgment, depends on biological knowledge that still needs to be acquired.


Convergent Evolution Of Sentience?, Culum Brown Prof. 2020 Macquarie University

Convergent Evolution Of Sentience?, Culum Brown Prof.

Animal Sentience

Mikhalevich & Powell make a compelling case that some invertebrates may be sentient and that our moral obligations in the context of welfare should hence extend to them. Although the case is similar to that made for fishes, there is one obvious difference in that examples of invertebrate sentience probably arose independently from vertebrate sentience. We have unequivocal proof that complex cognition arose multiple times over evolutionary history. Given that cognition is our best tool for indirectly quantifying sentience, it seems highly likely that this multiple polygenesis may also have occurred for sentience. In acknowledging this, we must accept that the ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress