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Melrose Beasley, 2021 Georgia Southern University

Melrose Beasley

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


Mrs. Emma Rucker, 2021 Georgia Southern University

Mrs. Emma Rucker

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


Mrs. Willie Mae London Sawyer, 2021 Georgia Southern University

Mrs. Willie Mae London Sawyer

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


Mr. Clifford Scott, 2021 Georgia Southern University

Mr. Clifford Scott

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


The Committee On Public Information And The Four Minute Men: How The United States Sold A European War To American People, Madison McTernan 2021 James Madison University

The Committee On Public Information And The Four Minute Men: How The United States Sold A European War To American People, Madison Mcternan

MAD-RUSH Undergraduate Research Conference

Shortly after America’s entry into World War I, President Woodrow Wilson created the Committee on Public Information to garner public support for the War. This committee was created not only to drum up support for the war, but to ease a public frustrated by an isolationist president’s entry into such a conflict. Notable reporter and writer George Creel served as its chairman, and together with countless others created a massive propaganda campaign. The Committee was incredibly successful in its mission of “selling the war.” This was largely due to the fact that Creel and his men revolutionized the ...


Understanding The Importance Of Statues: Symbols Of Racism In Modern Society, Theresa VanWormer 2021 St. John Fisher College

Understanding The Importance Of Statues: Symbols Of Racism In Modern Society, Theresa Vanwormer

The Review: A Journal of Undergraduate Student Research

Whether it is a monument, statue, plaque, or mural, the values and ideologies that are memorialized on public land reflect what reality the people of a country are choosing to remember. The United States’ political and racial history has led to the creation of controversial memorials, including memorials that honor the Confederacy and its leaders, influencing moral concepts based in racism, violence, and oppression. The continued veneration of these symbols on public land sends the message to the Black community that their oppressors are honored as heroes and that the society they live in still allows for their abuse. Annette-Gordon ...


Brantley Simmons, 2021 Georgia Southern University

Brantley Simmons

African American Funeral Programs, Willow Hill Heritage & Renaissance Center, Bulloch County, Georgia

No abstract provided.


The Haunted History Of New Orleans: An Exploration Of The Intersectionality Between Dark Tourism, Black History, And Public History, Laura Foley 2021 Rowan University

The Haunted History Of New Orleans: An Exploration Of The Intersectionality Between Dark Tourism, Black History, And Public History, Laura Foley

Theses and Dissertations

This research examines three popular ghost stories/legends of New Orleans that deal with issues of race. Madame Lalaurie, Julie, and Marie Laveau are popular subjects that are often sensationalized and removed from their proper historical context while treating legend as fact. This study not only analyzes the historical accuracy or historical context of these tales, but also addresses how these stories shape public perception and memory on topics such as race and local history. In addition, this study focuses on the intersectionality of dark tourism and public history and the ethical questions that often arise when the two meet.


Manumission In Virginia: The Anti-Slavery Legacy Of John Lynch, Stephen A. Langeland 2021 Liberty University

Manumission In Virginia: The Anti-Slavery Legacy Of John Lynch, Stephen A. Langeland

CULTURE & CRISIS: Reconciling Constitutionalism & Federalism in a Time of Crisis

This paper is in no way an apology for the institution of slavery in any form. In fact, it is a reiteration of Biblical doctrine and natural rights philosophy that posit all humans are created equal. The institution of slavery knew few bounds throughout recorded history and was as ubiquitous and durable as the activities of marriage or warfare, practiced by every culture and religion (Drescher 2009, 7-8, 12-39). Negro slavery specifically was an institution in all colonies of the New World at some point in history (Davis 1969, vii). The morality of slavery was an unquestioned fact of life ...


Session 2: Panel 2: Presenter 1 (Paper) -- A Brief History Of Footwear, Tobias B. Boudreau 2021 Grant High School

Session 2: Panel 2: Presenter 1 (Paper) -- A Brief History Of Footwear, Tobias B. Boudreau

Young Historians Conference

The use of footwear as a unit of analysis will help historians re-evaluate the relationship between technological diffusion and culture. Shoes are a common item across the globe, regardless of geographical, cultural, and economic divisions, and have been for a long time. Footwear reflects the sociopolitical, economic, and cultural environment of its owner, as well as characteristics of the owner themself. Shoes have taken on significant symbolic roles in art, literature, and everyday life. Essay is divided into four sections; Prehistory, Ancient, Middle Ages, Modern. Various examples from each time period are explained, compared with one another, and connected together ...


Out Of Sight, Out Of Mind: Analyzing Inhumane Practices In Mississippi’S Correctional Institutions Due To Overcrowding, Understaffing, And Diminished Funding, Ariel A. Williams 2021 University of Mississippi

Out Of Sight, Out Of Mind: Analyzing Inhumane Practices In Mississippi’S Correctional Institutions Due To Overcrowding, Understaffing, And Diminished Funding, Ariel A. Williams

Honors Theses

The purpose of this research is to examine the political, social, and economic factors which have led to inhumane conditions in Mississippi’s correctional facilities. Several methods were employed, including a comparison of the historical and current methods of funding, staffing, and rehabilitating prisoners based on literature reviews. State-sponsored reports from various departments and the legislature were analyzed to provide insight into budgetary restrictions and political will to allocate funds. Statistical surveys and data were reviewed to determine how overcrowding and understaffing negatively affect administrative capacity and prisoners’ mental and physical well-being. Ultimately, it may be concluded that Mississippi has ...


The Roosevelt School: A Tiger's Place In The History Of Public-School Integration, Kenya L. Lane 2021 Winthrop University

The Roosevelt School: A Tiger's Place In The History Of Public-School Integration, Kenya L. Lane

Graduate Theses

South Carolina, like many southern states, spent fifteen years avoiding complete compliance with the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka ruling to desegregate schools. Despite the statewide attempts to keep schools segregated, some South Carolina school districts slowly made strides to integrate with little resistance. By the mid 1960s, the Clover School District, even with trepidation, began to integrate its schools. These efforts to give African American students equal access often came at a cost. The process of integration often involved diminishing the value and very presence of traditionally all-black public schools.

The Roosevelt School, Clover’s only ...


The Enslaved People And The Tylers Too: Why It Is Imperative To Discuss Slavery In Public History, Meredith Jackson 2021 William & Mary

The Enslaved People And The Tylers Too: Why It Is Imperative To Discuss Slavery In Public History, Meredith Jackson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper focuses on the intersection of slavery and public history in the present day, specifically researching how the Tyler family perpetuated slavery and the Lost Cause and the enslaved people at Sherwood Forest Plantation as a microhistory.


May 2021, Temple Shalom 2021 University of Southern Maine

May 2021, Temple Shalom

Newsletter Archive

No abstract provided.


"Epic Poems In Bronze": Confederate Memorialization And The Old South's Reckoning With Modernity In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries, Grace Ford-Dirks 2021 William & Mary

"Epic Poems In Bronze": Confederate Memorialization And The Old South's Reckoning With Modernity In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries, Grace Ford-Dirks

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Scholars of the American South generally end their studies of Confederate memorization just before World War 1. Because of a decline in the number of physical monuments and memorials to the Confederacy dedicated in the years immediately following the war, scholars appear to regard the interwar era as a period separate from the Lost Cause movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. However, to fully understand the complexity of developing Southern identities in the modern age, it is essential to expand traditional definitions of Confederate memorialization and the time period in which it is studied. This paper explores ...


The Myth Of The Vanishing Race: Interpreting Historical Photographs Of Native Americans, Thomas P. Albritton 2021 Boise State University

The Myth Of The Vanishing Race: Interpreting Historical Photographs Of Native Americans, Thomas P. Albritton

History Graduate Projects and Theses

Much of Indigenous peoples’ experience in America has been shaped by white settler colonialism, politics, and imperialism. The master narration and representation for the Indigenous past predominantly have been created by white men (European colonists, historians, and creators of pop culture), resulting in a myth of a vanishing race, the belief of many non-Indigenous people’s that Indigenous cultures, customs, and heritage were vanishing or have disappeared. Specifically, the Edward S. Curtis photograph titled “The Vanishing Race—Navaho,” ca. 1904 continues to be a significant propagator of misconceptions of a vanishing race or a long-forgotten people, even as those cultures ...


Maine Bisexual People's Network (Mbpn), Kat Hartford 2021 University of Southern Maine

Maine Bisexual People's Network (Mbpn), Kat Hartford

POP 101: Queering the Archives

This presentation attempts to construct a history of the Maine Bisexual People’s Network (MBPN), drawing from primary sources from USM’s Special Collections, specifically from the LGBTQ+ Collection in the Jean Byers Sampson Center. Information includes when, why, and how the MBPN was founded, who founded the organization, important events in the MBPN’s history, and the experience of bisexuality for Mainers. Also included are images of the primary sources, such as clips from Our Paper: Serving the Alternative Community, a publication that served queer Mainers. While the MBPN was just one of several examples from Maine’s history ...


Creating “The 946:” The Provenance Of A Harding History Display, Hannah Wood 2021 Harding University

Creating “The 946:” The Provenance Of A Harding History Display, Hannah Wood

Tenor of Our Times

This articles looks into the creation of a display in the Harding University Brackett Library in the fall of 2020. The display highlights the 946 members of the Harding community who, in 1957, signed a statement of attitude regarding their desire to fully integrate the school.


Mapping Renewal: How An Unexpected Interdisciplinary Collaboration Transformed A Digital Humanities Project, Elise Tanner, Geoffrey Joseph 2021 UA Little Rock Center for Arkansas History and Culture

Mapping Renewal: How An Unexpected Interdisciplinary Collaboration Transformed A Digital Humanities Project, Elise Tanner, Geoffrey Joseph

Digital Initiatives Symposium

Funded by a National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Foundations Grant, the UA Little Rock Center for Arkansas History and Culture’s “Mapping Renewal” pilot project focused on creating access to and providing spatial context to archival materials related to racial segregation and urban renewal in the city of Little Rock, Arkansas, from 1954-1989. An unplanned interdisciplinary collaboration with the UA Little Rock Arkansas Economic Development Institute (AEDI) has proven to be an invaluable partnership. One team member from each department will demonstrate the Mapping Renewal website and discuss how the collaborative process has changed and ...


Stories Behind The Brick And Mortar: Voices Of Mississippi University For Women, Lauren Harmon 2021 Mississippi University for Women

Stories Behind The Brick And Mortar: Voices Of Mississippi University For Women, Lauren Harmon

Merge

No abstract provided.


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