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A Decolonial Middle School Social Studies Curriculum: 19th Century U.S. Westward Colonization, Leah Chatterji 2021 The University of San Francisco

A Decolonial Middle School Social Studies Curriculum: 19th Century U.S. Westward Colonization, Leah Chatterji

Master's Projects and Capstones

Social Studies education throughout the United States sustains settler futurity, white supremacy, and coloniality, as it rarely engages with Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) hxstories and structural violence. For middle schoolers, this is especially troublesome as social justice pedagogies are minimal for this demographic. To shift this, this field project offers an 8th grade decolonial Social Studies curriculum on 19th century U.S. Westward colonization; this topic was intentionally chosen as it is an opportunity to disrupt settler epistemologies. It centers: Land; relationality; and collective liberation. It complements the California unit 8.8 standards, yet different ...


Within The Shadow Of The Cowboy: Myths And Realities Of The Old American West, Katherine Lamb 2021 Bellarmine University

Within The Shadow Of The Cowboy: Myths And Realities Of The Old American West, Katherine Lamb

Undergraduate Theses

It has been argued that the American cowboy is the most widely misunderstood and misinterpreted figure in American history. This mythic figure does not look like the real ranch hands who littered the American West throughout the nineteenth century, nor does he act like them. Instead, he is set apart, as a figurehead of masculinity and American ideals, determined to roam the frontier as a guardian of justice and stability. This version of the cowboy, however, is not bound within the pages of novels or within limitations of film. Instead, the cowboy’s ideals, persona, look, and code remain a ...


Contributors, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Contributors, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Contributors to this issue


Director's Meeting, December 7, 1968, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Director's Meeting, December 7, 1968, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Minutes of the directors' meeting


Historical News, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Historical News, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Notice of the annual meeting, manuscript acquisitions


Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Reviews of Rudloe, The Sea Brings Forth, by Marian Murray; deHolguin, Tales of Palm Beach, by James R. Knott and George L. Hern, Jr.; Ferris (ed.), Explorers and Settlers: Historic Places Commemorating the Early Exploration and Settlement of the United States, by Earle W. Newton; Jones (ed.) and Lacher (trans.), Detailed Reports on the Salzburger Emigrants Who Settled in America . . . Edited by Samuel Urlsperger, Volume 1, 1733-1734, by Jerry L. Surratt; Rose, Prologue to Democracy: The Federalists in the South, 1789-1800, by Walker Blanton; Nasatir, Spanish War Vessels on the Mississippi, 1792-1796, by Robert L. Gold; Ernst, Rufus King: American ...


The Southern Limit Of Timucua Territory, Ripley P. Bullen 2021 University of Central Florida

The Southern Limit Of Timucua Territory, Ripley P. Bullen

Florida Historical Quarterly

According to a popular belief the area south of Tampa Bay was the domicile of the Calusa Indians. Whatever the origin of this dogma, it is likely connected with the fact that Narvaez and De Soto supposedly landed in Timucua Indian territory. How far south of Shaw’s Point this territory may have extended has never been delineated. Historically, north Florida east of the Aucilla River was inhabited by Timucua, and south Florida, south and west of Lake Okeechobee, by Calusa Indians. Archaeological evidence suggests that regional differences in material culture had existed for about 1,500 years before the ...


Bemrose's Medical Case Notes From The Second Seminole War, E. A. Hammond 2021 University of Central Florida

Bemrose's Medical Case Notes From The Second Seminole War, E. A. Hammond

Florida Historical Quarterly

John Bemrose, a young pharmacist’s apprentice from Lincolnshire, England, began his long sea journey to the United States in August 1831. He disembarked in New York harbor in late September, and shortly afterwards, on November 1, he appeared at an army recruiting post in Philadelphia and accepted a five-year enlistment in the United States army. He was eighteen years old at the time. His slight acquaintance with the field of medicine was sufficient to obtain for him an assignment as hospital steward and surgeon’s aide and an early transfer to garrison duty in St. Augustine. As hostilities between ...


Military Reconstruction And The Growth Of The Anti-Negro Sentiment In Florida, 1867, Ralph L. Peek 2021 University of Central Florida

Military Reconstruction And The Growth Of The Anti-Negro Sentiment In Florida, 1867, Ralph L. Peek

Florida Historical Quarterly

After months of bitter controversy Congress passed, over the President’s veto, the Reconstruction Acts of March 2 and March 23, 1867. The South was divided into five military districts, each ruled by a major general; Florida, Alabama, and Georgia comprised the third military district which was commanded by Major General John Pope. He in turn appointed Colonel John T. Sprague to head the sub-district of Florida, with headquarters at Tallahassee and later at Jacksonville. Sprague assumed command on April 1, 1867, with ten companies of the 7th United States Infantry and six companies of the 5th United States Artillery ...


Florida Black Codes, Joe M. Richardson 2021 University of Central Florida

Florida Black Codes, Joe M. Richardson

Florida Historical Quarterly

After Civil Governments had been reorganized under President Andrew Johnson, the southern states passed laws popularly called “black codes” which frankly differentiated between Negroes and whites. These laws were products of the “baneful heritage” of slavery which rooted in the southern mind false ideas of the Negro, including biological inferiority and innate criminality. The first and among the harshest codes, passed by Mississippi and South Carolina in late 1865, activated a storm of protest from the North. Numerous northern editors warned the South that the sentiment of the country was “firmly fixed” upon the necessity of securing complete protection for ...


Graveyard For Britons, West Florida, 1763-1781, Robert R. Rea 2021 University of Central Florida

Graveyard For Britons, West Florida, 1763-1781, Robert R. Rea

Florida Historical Quarterly

Today it is known as the Miracle Strip, and every spring its long white beaches beckon to sun-starved multitudes who flock to that stretch of coast centering upon Pensacola to the east and Mobile to the west. There lie warmth, relaxation, recreation, and health. Few of today’s sun-worshipers remember that Pensacola was once the swampy, fever-infested capital of British West Florida, and that Mobile was known as a “graveyard for Britons.”


Title Page, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Title Page, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Title page for Volume 47, Number 4. Includes the Table of Contents


Contributors, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Contributors, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Contributors to this issue


Historical News, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Historical News, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Notice of the annual meeting, activities and events of the society


Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Reviews of Marshall, Labor in the South, by Durward Long; Levine and Lurie (eds.), The American Indian Today, by John K. Mahon; Nolen, The Negro’s Image in the South: The Anatomy of White Supremacy, by Charles C. Alexander; Osborn, Woodrow Wilson: The Early Years, by Gerald E. Critoph; Jackson, The Ku Klux Klan in the City, 1915-1930, by Burl Noggle; Waring, A Medical History of South Carolina, 1825-1900, by E. Ashby Hammond


Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society 2021 University of Central Florida

Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Reviews of Bennett, Settlement of Florida, by Albert Manucy; Frasca, The Mulberry Tree, by Baynard Kendrick; Bridenbaugh, Vexed and Troubled Englishmen, 1590-1642, by Paul H. Smith; Commager and Giordanetti, Was America A Mistake? An Eighteenth-Century Controversy, by Churchill E. Ward; Caruso, The Mississippi Valley Frontier, by John L. Loos; Zahniser, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, Founding Father, by George C. Rogers, Jr.; Northrup, Twelve Years a Slave, by Frank G. Slaughter


The Florida Railroad After The Civil War, Dudley S. Johnson 2021 University of Central Florida

The Florida Railroad After The Civil War, Dudley S. Johnson

Florida Historical Quarterly

David Levy Yulee was the most enthusiastic of the early railroad promoters in Florida. On January 8, 1853, he incorporated the Florida Railroad to construct a line from the Atlantic Ocean to a point on the Gulf of Mexico south of the mouth of the Suwannee River. The charter was amended by the legislature in 1855, and the company was authorized to build from Amelia Island on the east coast to Tampa Bay on the Gulf of Mexico with a branch line to Cedar Key. In addition the company was authorized to own and operate steam vessels on Florida’s ...


Apalachicola: The Beginning, Harry P. Owens 2021 University of Central Florida

Apalachicola: The Beginning, Harry P. Owens

Florida Historical Quarterly

Edmund M. Blunt, editor of The American Pilot, stated in 1822, that there were only three points of destination on the gulf coast of the United States: New Orleans, Mobile, and Pensacola. Another port, however, Apalachicola, was slowly beginning to grow, and within twenty years it would supersede Pensacola as a cotton port.


Lieutenant Levin M. Powell, U.S.N., Pioneer Of Riverine Warfare, George E. Buker 2021 University of Central Florida

Lieutenant Levin M. Powell, U.S.N., Pioneer Of Riverine Warfare, George E. Buker

Florida Historical Quarterly

Geographically Vietnam is half a world away from Florida. Historically over a century and a quarter separates the present conflict in Southeast Asia from the Second Seminole War. In both of these engagements the United States Navy has conducted similar operations of maintaining combat coastal patrols against guerrilla operations. Today the amphibious river assault forces of the navy wend their passage among the tortuous waterways of the Mekong delta in riverine warfare. l The lineage of such naval operations go back to the Second Seminole War of 1835-1842 in Florida. The conflict erupted in December 1835, when the Indians took ...


United States, France, And West Florida, 1803-1807, Clifford L. Egan 2021 University of Central Florida

United States, France, And West Florida, 1803-1807, Clifford L. Egan

Florida Historical Quarterly

On April 30, 1803, in one of the great real estate transactions of history, France sold the United States the Louisiana Territory, an immense land with inexact boundaries. Seldom in history has one nation purchased so much for so little. With the signatures of Robert R. Livingston, James Monroe, and Francois de Marbois, America’s land area was almost doubled. At the same moment all differences between France and the United States seemingly were obliterated. Although President Jefferson had previously spoken of a British alliance since he feared Napoleon as a neighbor, he and his fellow Americans now looked to ...


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