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2009

International Law

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Articles 271 - 290 of 290

Full-Text Articles in Law

Treatment Differences And Political Realities In The Gaap-Ifrs Debate, William W. Bratton, Lawrence A. Cunningham Jan 2009

Treatment Differences And Political Realities In The Gaap-Ifrs Debate, William W. Bratton, Lawrence A. Cunningham

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


International Lawyer’S Guide To Legal Analysis And Communication In The United States, Kimberli Kelmor Jan 2009

International Lawyer’S Guide To Legal Analysis And Communication In The United States, Kimberli Kelmor

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Aspen Publishers has published another very useful book for non-U.S. students and practitioners who are faced with understanding U.S. law. At first, I was a bit perplexed that Aspen had published this book, since the company also publishes the widely used Legal Reasoning, Research, and Writing for International Graduate Students by Nadia Nedzel. However, while the content does overlap some, the two books have slightly different target audiences and overall goals. One of the main differences is that while Nedzel spends a great deal of time on U.S. legal research, the International Lawyer's Guide explicitly does ...


Strengthening Demand For The Rule Of Law In Post-Conflict Societies, Jane E. Stromseth Jan 2009

Strengthening Demand For The Rule Of Law In Post-Conflict Societies, Jane E. Stromseth

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Building the rule of law in the wake of military conflict has proven to be a complex and formidable challenge in countries as diverse as Iraq, Afghanistan, Timor-Leste, and Sierra Leone. It has become clear in these and other situations that strengthening the rule of law is not simply a matter of building institutions-courts, legislatures, and so forth-or enacting better laws. The rule of law also depends crucially on building public trust and confidence in those institutions. Or, to put it another way, strengthening the rule of law is not only a question of the supply side of institutions, but ...


Global Governance: The World Trade Organization's Contribution, Andrew D. Mitchell, Elizabeth Sheargold Jan 2009

Global Governance: The World Trade Organization's Contribution, Andrew D. Mitchell, Elizabeth Sheargold

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Democracy and administrative law concern ideas of governance, legitimacy, and accountability. With the growth of bureaucracy and regulation, many democratic theorists would argue that administrative law mechanisms are essential to achieving democratic objectives. This article considers the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) contribution to governance both in terms of global administrative law and democracy. In relation to administrative law, it first explores the extent to which the WTO’s own dispute settlement process contributes to this area. Second, it considers the operation of administrative law principles embedded within the WTO Agreements on Members. For example, the WTO Agreements require that ...


Book Review: Protection Of Foreign Investment In Context: Nigeria's Investment Laws, Treaties, And Petroleum Agreements, Duncan E. Alford Jan 2009

Book Review: Protection Of Foreign Investment In Context: Nigeria's Investment Laws, Treaties, And Petroleum Agreements, Duncan E. Alford

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Labor Flexibility, Legal Reform And Economic Development, Alvaro Santos Jan 2009

Labor Flexibility, Legal Reform And Economic Development, Alvaro Santos

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The current global financial crisis has provoked intense criticism of the regulatory framework for financial markets. Financial market flexibility, once considered the key to successful financial institutions and economic growth, has now come under intense scrutiny. In contrast, labor market flexibility is still promoted by scholars and international policymakers as an essential part of the recipe for economic development. This Article argues that the predominant understanding of labor flexibility is misguided and needs to be revised. To illustrate why, the Article undertakes a critical examination of labor flexibility as developed by a leading World Bank project, called “Doing Business.” It ...


Is Law An Economic Contest? French Reactions To The Doing Business World Bank Reports And Economic Analysis Of The Law, Anne-Julie Kerhuel, Bénédicte Fauvarque-Cosson Jan 2009

Is Law An Economic Contest? French Reactions To The Doing Business World Bank Reports And Economic Analysis Of The Law, Anne-Julie Kerhuel, Bénédicte Fauvarque-Cosson

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The economic analysis of law has provoked strong reactions among French academics, in particular since 2004 when the first of the Doing Business reports was published. French jurists have joined forces to expose the methodological limits inherent to these reports, which rated France a long way behind other legal systems allegedly more able to facilitate business. In its first part, this article examines the various reactions to these reports, almost all of which were published in French only. In the second part, the focus is on the position of economic analysis in French law, its role, and, in particular, the ...


Missouri V. Holland’S Second Holding, Carlos Manuel Vázquez Jan 2009

Missouri V. Holland’S Second Holding, Carlos Manuel Vázquez

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The Supreme Court in Missouri v. Holland famously held that Congress has the power to pass a law to implement a treaty even if the law would not fall within Congress’ legislative power in the absence of the treaty. Essential to this holding were two distinct propositions. The first proposition is that the treaty-makers have the constitutional power to make treaties on matters falling outside Congress’ enumerated powers. The second is that, if the treaty-makers make such a treaty and the treaty is not self-executing, the Necessary and Proper Clause gives Congress the power to implement such a treaty through ...


Less Than Zero?, Carlos Manuel Vázquez Jan 2009

Less Than Zero?, Carlos Manuel Vázquez

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Medellin v. Texas is the first case in which the Supreme Court has denied a treaty-based claim solely on the ground that the treaty relied upon was non-self-executing. In Foster v. Neilson, the only other case in which the Court had denied relief on this ground, the Court offered its view that the treaty was non-self-executing as an alternative ground for denying relief. The Court soon thereafter disavowed its conclusion that the treaty involved in Foster was non-self-executing, and, in the intervening years, it repeatedly declined invitations to deny relief on this or related grounds. Many observers thought that the ...


Justice On The Ground: Can International Criminal Courts Strengthen Domestic Rule Of Law In Post-Conflict Societies?, Jane E. Stromseth Jan 2009

Justice On The Ground: Can International Criminal Courts Strengthen Domestic Rule Of Law In Post-Conflict Societies?, Jane E. Stromseth

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The author examines how developments in international criminal law – including creation of the International Criminal Court and various hybrid tribunals – can have an impact on rule-of-law building efforts in post-conflict societies. Although trials of atrocity perpetrators primarily and appropriately focus on fairly trying the accused individuals, these processes also have a wider impact on public perceptions of justice and potentially can influence a society’s ability to embrace rule of law norms. The quality of outreach and capacity-building accompanying these trials may well have a decisive effect on whether these proceedings, on balance, strengthen or undermine public confidence in justice ...


Universal Jurisdiction As An International 'False Conflict' Of Laws, Anthony J. Colangelo Jan 2009

Universal Jurisdiction As An International 'False Conflict' Of Laws, Anthony J. Colangelo

Faculty Scholarship

This symposium Essay uses the private law notion of a "false conflict" of laws to develop a coherent and normatively sound legal framework for evaluating the exercise of universal jurisdiction by states in the international legal system. The Essay suggests that properly exercised, universal jurisdiction creates no conflict of laws among states because, as a matter of prescriptive jurisdiction, universal jurisdiction is never really extra-territorial, and thus never generates the possibility of conflicting, overlapping laws. Rather, universal jurisdiction comprises a comprehensive territorial jurisdiction, originating in a universally-applicable international law that covers the globe. Individual states may apply and enforce that ...


Double Jeopardy And Multiple Sovereigns: A Jurisdictional Theory, Anthony J. Colangelo Jan 2009

Double Jeopardy And Multiple Sovereigns: A Jurisdictional Theory, Anthony J. Colangelo

Faculty Scholarship

This Article offers a coherent way of thinking about double jeopardy rules among sovereigns. Its theory has strong explanatory power for current double jeopardy law and practice in both U.S. federal and international legal systems, recommends adjustments to double jeopardy doctrine in both systems, and sharpens normative assessment of that doctrine.

The Article develops a jurisdictional theory of double jeopardy under which sovereignty signifies independent jurisdiction to make and apply law. Using this theory, the Article recasts the history of the U.S. Supreme Court's dual sovereignty doctrine entirely in terms of jurisdiction, penetrating the opacity of the ...


The Constitutionality Of Decolonization By Associated Statehood: Puerto Rico's Legal Status Reconsidered, Robert Sloane, Gary Lawson Jan 2009

The Constitutionality Of Decolonization By Associated Statehood: Puerto Rico's Legal Status Reconsidered, Robert Sloane, Gary Lawson

Faculty Scholarship

International and constitutional law arguably collide in the legal arrangement between the United States and Puerto Rico. As a matter of international law, it is unclear that this arrangement conforms to customary international and treaty obligations. As a matter of national law, it is unclear that the Constitution permits an arrangement between Puerto Rico and the United States—short of separation (independence as a State) or integration (admission to the Union as a state)—that could conform to these international obligations. In particular, the Appointments Clause and the Constitution’s voting provisions may well be in tension with contemporary international ...


From Here To Beijing: Public/Private Overlaps In Trade And Their Effects On U.S. Law, Elizabeth Trujillo Jan 2009

From Here To Beijing: Public/Private Overlaps In Trade And Their Effects On U.S. Law, Elizabeth Trujillo

Faculty Scholarship

Recent news involving contaminated pet food and unsafe toys imported from China makes us question the legal frameworks that facilitated such incidences and stirs anti-globalization sentiment. While consumers wonder about the role of their governments in this context and look for judicial remedies, deeper questions arise regarding the international forces lying beneath the surface of the legal remedial work of our domestic courts. This paper explores the international trade paradigm in place that facilitates the inner workings of private investors and has trickling effects on domestic law. Furthermore, it will show that the trade regime is transnational in nature, consisting ...


The Pace Of International Criminal Justice, Jean Galbraith Jan 2009

The Pace Of International Criminal Justice, Jean Galbraith

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Breaking The Genuine Link: The Contemporary International Legal Regulation Of Nationality, Robert Sloane Jan 2009

Breaking The Genuine Link: The Contemporary International Legal Regulation Of Nationality, Robert Sloane

Faculty Scholarship

The concept of nationality traditionally mediated the relationship between the individual and the state in a bygone era in which international law regarded only the latter as a genuine subject of the law; today, its international legal functions have expanded. Yet, as in the past, it remains unclear whether and how international law limits the otherwise almost plenary competence of states to confer their nationality by their internal laws in a way entitled to international recognition. After the International Court of Justice's ("ICJ") 1955 judgment in Nottebohm, however, lawyers began to express this limit with a kind of doctrinal ...


International Decision, Civil Party Participation In Provisional Detention Appeals, Extraordinary Chambers In The Courts Of Cambodia, Jenia I. Turner Jan 2009

International Decision, Civil Party Participation In Provisional Detention Appeals, Extraordinary Chambers In The Courts Of Cambodia, Jenia I. Turner

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


After The Revolution: Global Health Politics In A Time Of Economic Crisis And Threatening Future Trends, David P. Fidler Jan 2009

After The Revolution: Global Health Politics In A Time Of Economic Crisis And Threatening Future Trends, David P. Fidler

Articles by Maurer Faculty

In 2008, global health’s political revolution, which unfolded over the preceding 10-15 years, ended when four global crises damaged global health and altered the political, diplomatic, and governance contexts in which global health activities operate. The climate change, energy, food, and economic crises revealed limitations in global health’s ability to shape large-scale political, economic, and environmental problems that adversely affect health or harm underlying determinants of health. In addition, projected trends in world affairs potentially threaten health and the ability of countries to craft effective collective action responses to global problems damaging health directly and indirectly. In the ...


Toward A Theory Of Persuasive Authority, Chad Flanders Jan 2009

Toward A Theory Of Persuasive Authority, Chad Flanders

All Faculty Scholarship

The debate about the citation of foreign authorities has become stale. One side says that citing foreign authorities means being beholden to foreign sovereigns. The other side responds that this is nonsense, as the authorities are being used only for their "persuasive value." But do we even have a good idea of what it means to be a persuasive authority? My essay is the first to focus entirely on the notion of persuasive authority and to make the first steps towards providing a general theory of it. I make two major contributions. First, I try to show that there is ...


Disaggregating The Regional-Multilateral Overlap: The Nafta Looking-Glass, Elizabeth Trujillo Jan 2009

Disaggregating The Regional-Multilateral Overlap: The Nafta Looking-Glass, Elizabeth Trujillo

Faculty Scholarship

This short piece explores regionalism through the lens of NAFTA and examines its relationship to the multilateral trade regime and its effects on domestic policy. It tries to better understand the legal paradigm that allows the public aspects of trade law to intersect with the private interests of private investors. The rich jurisprudence of the Chapter 11 investment chapter of NAFTA provides a looking-glass into the complex interplay of state and non-state actors who navigate through the regional and multilateral trade and investment frameworks to further their interests. By disaggregating these overlaps, the paper illuminates this interplay which allows private ...