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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Sohn Collection Shines At Uga School Of Law, Thomson Reuters Oct 2009

The Sohn Collection Shines At Uga School Of Law, Thomson Reuters

Articles, Chapters and Online Publications

An interview with Anne Burnett, foreign and international law librarian at the Alexander Campbell King Law Library, reveals a unique library collection from a former world scholar.


Medellin, Delegation And Conflicts (Of Law), Peter B. Rutledge Oct 2009

Medellin, Delegation And Conflicts (Of Law), Peter B. Rutledge

Scholarly Works

The case of Medellin v. Texas presented the Supreme Court with a recurring question that has bedeviled judges, legal scholars, and political scientists-what effect, if any, must a United States court give to the decision of an international tribunal, particularly where, during the relevant time, the United States was party to a treaty protocol that bound it to that tribunal's judgments. While the Supreme Court held that the International Court of Justice's ("ICJ") decision was not enforceable federal law, its decision reflected an important recognition that the issues presented in that case were not limited to the specific ...


Historical American Perspectives On International Law, Harlan G. Cohen Apr 2009

Historical American Perspectives On International Law, Harlan G. Cohen

Scholarly Works

The United States’ relationship with international law, although oft-discussed, is poorly understood. Depictions of the relationship are often little more than caricatures. Depending on when the caricature is drawn, the United States may be a longstanding “champion” of international law, an “exceptionalist” defender of American values, or a hypocritical opponent of international governance. Many traditional histories do little to complicate these views. Focused primarily on foreign affairs law and constitutional war powers, these histories highlight moments of tension between the United States and international law. Missing from these histories of American diplomacy and warcraft, foreign affairs caselaw and doctrinal development ...


Soft Law As Delegation, Timothy L. Meyer Feb 2009

Soft Law As Delegation, Timothy L. Meyer

Scholarly Works

This article examines one of the most important trends in international legal governance since the end of the Second World War: the rise of "soft law," or legally non-binding instruments. Scholars studying the design of international agreements have long puzzled over why states use soft law. The decision to make an agreement or obligation legally binding is within the control of the states negotiating the content of the legal obligations. Basic contract theory predicts that parties to a contract would want their agreement to be as credible as possible, to ensure optimal incentives to perform. It is therefore odd that ...


Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2009, Vol. 4, Issue 1, The Dean Rusk International Law Center Jan 2009

Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2009, Vol. 4, Issue 1, The Dean Rusk International Law Center

Newsletters

Gary Born Delivers Keynote at International Arbitration Conference; Twenty Percent of First Year Class Participates in 2008 Rusk Center Summer Programs; Recent Publications; International Law Colloquium Series; Director's Note; Former Diplomats Share Notes on Obama's Foreign Policy; Chief Justice of India Delivers Lecture on Individual Rights; In Their Own Words: Daniel Tilley, Terressa Davis; Russell Edwards; Daniel West; Environmental Policy Analyst Works with School of Law Professor in 2008; Chinese Scholars to Visit in 2009; Rusk Center Director Works with State and National Leaders; International Judicial Training Program Continues Work with Foreign Judiciaries;


Can International Law Work? A Constructivist Expansion, Harlan G. Cohen Jan 2009

Can International Law Work? A Constructivist Expansion, Harlan G. Cohen

Scholarly Works

An increasing number of scholars have begun to apply rational choice methodologies to the study of international law. Earlier rational choice scholarship voicing skepticism about international law’s true force has since been followed by sophisticated rational choice defenses of international law. This review essay focuses on Andrew Guzman’s recent book HOW INTERNATIONAL LAW WORKS: A RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY (2008), one of the best of those defenses. In that book, Guzman develops an elegant and sophisticated account of 'reputation' and the role it can play in encouraging rational compliance with international law. Based on this account, Guzman makes a ...


International Common Law: The Soft Law Of International Tribunals, Timothy L. Meyer, Andrew T. Guzman Jan 2009

International Common Law: The Soft Law Of International Tribunals, Timothy L. Meyer, Andrew T. Guzman

Scholarly Works

Rising legalization in the international community has lead to greater use of international tribunals and soft law. This paper explores the intersection of these instruments. The decision of an international tribunal interprets binding legal obligations but is not itself legally binding except, in some instances, as between the parties. The broader, and often more important function of a tribunal's decision - its influence on state behavior beyond the particular case and its impact on perceptions regarding legal obligations - is best characterized as a form of soft law.

Despite its inability to bind states, a tribunal can influence state behavior by ...