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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Law

Conceptualizing Aggression, Noah Weisbord Jan 2009

Conceptualizing Aggression, Noah Weisbord

Faculty Publications

The special working group tasked by the International Criminal Court’s Assembly of States Parties to define the supreme international crime, the crime of aggression, has produced a breakthrough draft definition.

This paper analyzes the key concepts that make up the emerging definition of the crime of aggression by developing and applying a future-oriented methodology that brings together scenario planning and grounded theory. It proposes modifications and interpretations of the constituent concepts of the crime of aggression intended to make the definition sociologically relevant today and in the foreseeable future.


Towards A Unique Theory Of International Criminal Sentencing, Jens David Ohlin Jan 2009

Towards A Unique Theory Of International Criminal Sentencing, Jens David Ohlin

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

International criminal law currently lacks a robust procedure for sentencing convicted defendants. Legal scholars have already critiqued the sentencing procedures at the ad hoc tribunals, and the Rome Statute does little more than refer to the gravity of the offense and the individual circumstances of the criminal. No procedures are in place to guide judges in exercising their discretion in a matter that is arguably the most central aspect of international criminal law - punishment. This paper argues that the deficiency of sentencing procedures stems from a more fundamental theoretical deficiency - the lack of a unique theory of punishment for international ...


Self-Representation In The International Arena: Removing A False Right Of Spectacle, Eugene Cerruti Jan 2009

Self-Representation In The International Arena: Removing A False Right Of Spectacle, Eugene Cerruti

Articles & Chapters

Recent historical scholarship has demonstrated that the practice of self-representation at common law was developed and promoted not to secure a valued right to the accused but rather to compromise the defendant’s ability to present an effective defense - by denying him an effective right to be represented by counsel. The Supreme Court in Faretta v. California stood this history on its head in order to read into the Sixth Amendment an implied right to self-representation equal to the now preeminent right to counsel. The Faretta doctrine was carelessly adopted yet has been resolutely defended by the Supreme Court, to ...


Regionalizing International Criminal Law?, Charles Chernor Jalloh Jan 2009

Regionalizing International Criminal Law?, Charles Chernor Jalloh

Faculty Publications

This article examines the initially cooperative but increasingly tense relationship between the International Criminal Court (ICC) and Africa. It assesses the various legal and political reasons for the mounting criticisms of the ICC by African governments, especially within the African Union (AU), following the indictment of incumbent Sudanese President Omar Hassan Al Bashir. The author situates the ICC within broader African efforts to establish more peaceful societies through the continent-wide AU. He submits that the ICC, by prosecuting architects of serious international crimes in Africa’s numerous conflicts, could contribute significantly to the continent’s fledgling peace and security architecture ...


Complementarity In Crisis: Uganda, Alternative Justice, And The International Criminal Court, Alexander K.A. Greenawalt Jan 2009

Complementarity In Crisis: Uganda, Alternative Justice, And The International Criminal Court, Alexander K.A. Greenawalt

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

In this Article, I take up a focused analysis of the Uganda prosecutions, considering both the interpretive dilemmas facing the Court and the efforts of Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo to address them. Part I provides a summary of events leading to the LRA arrest warrants and the recent peace negotiations. Part II turns to the text of the Rome Statute, with a focus on Article 19's framework for complementary jurisdiction and the Article 53 dictate that “interests of justice” may trump the admissibility of investigations and cases that otherwise meet all relevant statutory criteria. Although the ICC is structured to ...


Introductory Note To The International Criminal Court: Summary Of The Prosecutor's Application Under Article 58, Milena Sterio Jan 2009

Introductory Note To The International Criminal Court: Summary Of The Prosecutor's Application Under Article 58, Milena Sterio

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Luis Moreno-Ocampo, Chief Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC), undertook a significant step in his office's investigation of the situation in Darfur, Sudan, on November 20, 2008, when he requested Pre-Trial Chamber I to issue an arrest warrant against three named individuals. These individuals, whose names have remained confidential, were commanders of rebel groups in Darfur that had carried out an attack on September 29, 2007 against African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS) peacekeepers stationed at the Haskanita Military Group Site.