Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

Bloodstains On A "Code Of Honor": The Murderous Marginalization Of Women In The Islamic World, Kenneth Lasson Apr 2009

Bloodstains On A "Code Of Honor": The Murderous Marginalization Of Women In The Islamic World, Kenneth Lasson

All Faculty Scholarship

In the real world of the Twenty-first Century, deep biases against women are prevalent in much of Muslim society. Although there is no explicit approval of honor killing in Islamic law (Sharia), its culture remains fundamentally patriarchal. As unfathomable as it is to Western minds, "honor killing" is a facet of traditional patriarchy, and its condonation can be traced largely to ancient tribal practices. Justifications for it can be found in the codes of Hammurabi and in the family law of the Roman Empire. Unfortunately, honor killings in the Twenty-first Century are not isolated incidents, nor can they be regarded ...


Pollard Languishes, Kenneth Lasson Feb 2009

Pollard Languishes, Kenneth Lasson

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Betraying Truth: Ethics Abuse In Middle East Reporting, Kenneth Lasson Jan 2009

Betraying Truth: Ethics Abuse In Middle East Reporting, Kenneth Lasson

All Faculty Scholarship

This article presents a brief overview of press freedom under the First Amendment, attempts to create a working definition of media “objectivity,” examines various codes of professional ethics for journalists, and analyzes specific cases in which such standards have allegedly been abused or abandoned in Middle East reporting.


Introductory Note To Dispute Regarding Navigational And Related Rights (Costa Rica V. Nicaragua), International Court Of Justice, Judgment Of 13 July 2009, Nienke Grossman Jan 2009

Introductory Note To Dispute Regarding Navigational And Related Rights (Costa Rica V. Nicaragua), International Court Of Justice, Judgment Of 13 July 2009, Nienke Grossman

All Faculty Scholarship

The Dispute Regarding Navigational and Related Rights (Costa Rica v. Nicaragua) concerns the rights of Nicaragua and Costa Rica over part of the San Juan River, located in the territory of the former, but whose right bank and certain navigational rights belong to the latter. In its July 13, 2009 Judgment, the International Court of Justice ("ICJ") made a number of specific rulings regarding the scope of Costa Rica's right to free navigation, Nicaragua's power to regulate that right, and Costa Rican riparians' subsistence fishing rights. Aside from its immediate significance for the litigating parties, the Judgment is ...


Legitimacy And International Adjudicative Bodies, Nienke Grossman Jan 2009

Legitimacy And International Adjudicative Bodies, Nienke Grossman

All Faculty Scholarship

This article proposes a theory of legitimacy tailored to international courts and tribunals. In Part II of this paper, the article defines an "international adjudicative body" as a dispute resolution mechanism - also called a "court" or "tribunal" - which decides disputes between litigants, at least one of whom must be a state, and comments on this definitional choice. The analysis in this article is limited only to adjudicative bodies where states are involved as litigants because a different set of legitimacy-influencing factors may be present when only private parties are involved. Next, it lays out a theory of legitimacy specifically for ...