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Full-Text Articles in Law

Transnational Legal Practice 2008, Laurel S. Terry, Carole Silver, Ellyn Rosen, Carol A. Needham, Jennifer Haworth Mccandless, Robert E. Lutz, Peter D. Ehrenhaft Jul 2009

Transnational Legal Practice 2008, Laurel S. Terry, Carole Silver, Ellyn Rosen, Carol A. Needham, Jennifer Haworth Mccandless, Robert E. Lutz, Peter D. Ehrenhaft

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The current financial turmoil shaking the world illustrates the connectedness of national markets and economies. Legal practice is no exception: lawyers and their firms are experiencing the upheaval along with their clients.1 This has resulted in new opportunities for lawyers and firms–in bankruptcy and restructuring and, likely in the future, in regulatory advising as well–and, at the same time, in substantial challenges. The promise of benefits from a diversified practice–in terms of both substance and geography–is being tested as lawyers and law firms follow their clients through the uncertainties of the current economic conditions.

As ...


Bloodstains On A "Code Of Honor": The Murderous Marginalization Of Women In The Islamic World, Kenneth Lasson Apr 2009

Bloodstains On A "Code Of Honor": The Murderous Marginalization Of Women In The Islamic World, Kenneth Lasson

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In the real world of the Twenty-first Century, deep biases against women are prevalent in much of Muslim society. Although there is no explicit approval of honor killing in Islamic law (Sharia), its culture remains fundamentally patriarchal. As unfathomable as it is to Western minds, "honor killing" is a facet of traditional patriarchy, and its condonation can be traced largely to ancient tribal practices. Justifications for it can be found in the codes of Hammurabi and in the family law of the Roman Empire. Unfortunately, honor killings in the Twenty-first Century are not isolated incidents, nor can they be regarded ...


An Identity Crisis Of International Organizations, Sungjoon Cho Mar 2009

An Identity Crisis Of International Organizations, Sungjoon Cho

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An Identity Crisis of International Organizations Abstract International organizations (IOs) are ubiquitous. More than two hundred IOs touch our everyday lives, ranging banking to flu-shots. However, conventional political scientists seldom pay sufficient attention to IOs which they thoroughly deserve given their contemporary prominence. Because conventional international relations (IR) theories consider IOs as mere passive machineries, they hardly offer a satisfactory explanation on a distinctive mode of IOs’ institutional dynamic, in which a specific IO, as a separate and autonomous organic entity, grows, evolves and eventually makes sense of its own existence. This Essay offers a novel perspective which attempts to ...


Pollard Languishes, Kenneth Lasson Feb 2009

Pollard Languishes, Kenneth Lasson

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No abstract provided.


Betraying Truth: Ethics Abuse In Middle East Reporting, Kenneth Lasson Jan 2009

Betraying Truth: Ethics Abuse In Middle East Reporting, Kenneth Lasson

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This article presents a brief overview of press freedom under the First Amendment, attempts to create a working definition of media “objectivity,” examines various codes of professional ethics for journalists, and analyzes specific cases in which such standards have allegedly been abused or abandoned in Middle East reporting.


Introductory Note To Dispute Regarding Navigational And Related Rights (Costa Rica V. Nicaragua), International Court Of Justice, Judgment Of 13 July 2009, Nienke Grossman Jan 2009

Introductory Note To Dispute Regarding Navigational And Related Rights (Costa Rica V. Nicaragua), International Court Of Justice, Judgment Of 13 July 2009, Nienke Grossman

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The Dispute Regarding Navigational and Related Rights (Costa Rica v. Nicaragua) concerns the rights of Nicaragua and Costa Rica over part of the San Juan River, located in the territory of the former, but whose right bank and certain navigational rights belong to the latter. In its July 13, 2009 Judgment, the International Court of Justice ("ICJ") made a number of specific rulings regarding the scope of Costa Rica's right to free navigation, Nicaragua's power to regulate that right, and Costa Rican riparians' subsistence fishing rights. Aside from its immediate significance for the litigating parties, the Judgment is ...


Legitimacy And International Adjudicative Bodies, Nienke Grossman Jan 2009

Legitimacy And International Adjudicative Bodies, Nienke Grossman

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This article proposes a theory of legitimacy tailored to international courts and tribunals. In Part II of this paper, the article defines an "international adjudicative body" as a dispute resolution mechanism - also called a "court" or "tribunal" - which decides disputes between litigants, at least one of whom must be a state, and comments on this definitional choice. The analysis in this article is limited only to adjudicative bodies where states are involved as litigants because a different set of legitimacy-influencing factors may be present when only private parties are involved. Next, it lays out a theory of legitimacy specifically for ...


Nation-Building In The Penumbra: Notes From A Liminal State, Monica E. Eppinger Jan 2009

Nation-Building In The Penumbra: Notes From A Liminal State, Monica E. Eppinger

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The emergence of post-Socialist legal orders is reshaping some of the familiar terrain of comparative legal studies. This Article, invited as part of an effort to think about the topic of "What the Rest think of the West," reconsiders the vast legal re-codification projects that stand at the center of "nation-building" projects in formerly Socialist states. Such projects, and the rupture from which they emerge, challenge essentialist or static notions of identity and assumptions of where the West is or where the Rest begin. Anthropological concepts of "liminality" and "deixis" assist in understanding Ukrainian legal experts' thinking on legal reforms ...


Toward A Theory Of Persuasive Authority, Chad Flanders Jan 2009

Toward A Theory Of Persuasive Authority, Chad Flanders

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The debate about the citation of foreign authorities has become stale. One side says that citing foreign authorities means being beholden to foreign sovereigns. The other side responds that this is nonsense, as the authorities are being used only for their "persuasive value." But do we even have a good idea of what it means to be a persuasive authority? My essay is the first to focus entirely on the notion of persuasive authority and to make the first steps towards providing a general theory of it. I make two major contributions. First, I try to show that there is ...