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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Law

Unsex Cedaw: What's Wrong With "Women's Rights", Darren Rosenblum Nov 2009

Unsex Cedaw: What's Wrong With "Women's Rights", Darren Rosenblum

International & Comparative Law Colloquium Papers

Although the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (“CEDAW” or the “Convention”) has succeeded in some respects, even its supporters acknowledge broad failures. CEDAW’s weakness draws on the titular mistaken diagnosis: “women” are not the issue&#;gender disparities are. The 1970’s drafting of CEDAW focused on bringing women to their place at the international law table. What’s wrong with women’s rights? In the international context, CEDAW attempts to empower women but fails to respect other gender inequality. As the preeminent treaty on gender inequality, CEDAW cannot succeed in creating gender equality ...


Book Review: The Iraq War And International Law, Maxwell O. Chibundu Jul 2009

Book Review: The Iraq War And International Law, Maxwell O. Chibundu

Faculty Scholarship

A review of The Iraq War and International Law edited by Phil Shiner and Andrew Williams. Oxford, Hart Publishing, 2008.


60 Years Of The Basic Law And Its Interpretation: An American Perspective, Peter E. Quint Jan 2009

60 Years Of The Basic Law And Its Interpretation: An American Perspective, Peter E. Quint

Faculty Scholarship

In commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the adoption of the German Basic Law (Constitution) , the author discusses certain aspects of the Basic Law, in comparison with the Constitution of the United States, and examines important developments in the jurisprudence if the German Constitutional Court interpreting the Basic Law.


Book Review: Fresh Perspectives On The "War On Terror", Katherine Vaughns Jan 2009

Book Review: Fresh Perspectives On The "War On Terror", Katherine Vaughns

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Whose Public? Which Law? Mapping The Internal/External Distinction In International Law, Peter G. Danchin Jan 2009

Whose Public? Which Law? Mapping The Internal/External Distinction In International Law, Peter G. Danchin

Faculty Scholarship

This chapter challenges and problematizes the convergence thesis between sovereignty and human rights which is argued to rest on only a partial understanding of the liberal tradition in international law, a position commonly referred to as “liberal anti-pluralism.” While relying on a contingent and thus contestable conception of individual autonomy, liberal anti-pluralist accounts do not in fact seek to challenge the rationale for public law or public reason itself. To the contrary, such accounts advance a vision of “universal” or “global” social order governed by a “neutral” public law which limits the freedom of its subjects pursuant to the single ...


The Universal Declaration And South African Constitutional Law: A Response To Justice Arthur Chaskalson, Peter E. Quint Jan 2009

The Universal Declaration And South African Constitutional Law: A Response To Justice Arthur Chaskalson, Peter E. Quint

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Universal Declaration And Developments In The Enforcement Of International Human Rights In Domestic Law, Michael P. Van Alstine Jan 2009

The Universal Declaration And Developments In The Enforcement Of International Human Rights In Domestic Law, Michael P. Van Alstine

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


International Law, Human Rights And The Transformative Occupation Of Iraq, Peter G. Danchin Jan 2009

International Law, Human Rights And The Transformative Occupation Of Iraq, Peter G. Danchin

Faculty Scholarship

This chapter examines the project of transformative occupation undertaken by the United States and its allies following the invasion of Iraq in 2003. More specifically, it considers the Iraqi occupation in light of two competing sensibilities in international legal argument. On one view, which I term “legal formalism”, the purpose of international law is eclectic, intersubjective and value-pluralist: to create the conditions for peaceful coexistence between different political orders and ways of life. This view is commonly associated with the liberalism of the United Nations Charter which posits both the subject of international law and its liberty in formal terms ...


New Modes And Orders: Is A Jus Post Bellum Of Constitutional Transformation Possible Or Desirable?, Nahal Bhuta Jan 2009

New Modes And Orders: Is A Jus Post Bellum Of Constitutional Transformation Possible Or Desirable?, Nahal Bhuta

International & Comparative Law Colloquium Papers

No abstract provided.


Positivism, New Haven Jurisprudence, And The Fragmentation Of International Law, Tai-Heng Cheng Jan 2009

Positivism, New Haven Jurisprudence, And The Fragmentation Of International Law, Tai-Heng Cheng

International & Comparative Law Colloquium Papers

This Article addresses the fragmentation of international law and international legal theory. This problem has become increasingly acute. As international interactions have increased exponentially among a broad range of domestic and international actors, the need to coordinate and regulate international actions has correspondingly intensified. Because actors cannot seem to agree on what international law is, consensus on applicable international laws and legal behavior often remains elusive. Using positivism and policy-oriented jurisprudence – two major theories of international law – as foci of inquiry, this Article demonstrates that the gulf between the two international legal theories are not really meaningful conceptual disagreements. Instead ...


Dancing With The Dragon: What U.S. Parties Should Know About Chinese Law When Drafting A Contractual Dispute Resolution Clause, Marcus Wang Jan 2009

Dancing With The Dragon: What U.S. Parties Should Know About Chinese Law When Drafting A Contractual Dispute Resolution Clause, Marcus Wang

Student Articles and Papers

This paper draws on scholarly and field research in both the United States and China to present a legal and practical primer for U.S. parties entering the Chinese marketplace.

As China's role in the global economy becomes more prominent, American companies are finding that doing business in China is necessary to retaining a competitive edge. As the number of transactions between American and Chinese companies increases, however, the number of potential disputes increases correspondingly. Unique legal and practical circumstances in China require a China-specific approach to managing such disputes.

The paper identifies one such approach – the use of ...