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Full-Text Articles in Law

Dancing With The Dragon: What U.S. Parties Should Know About Chinese Law When Drafting A Contractual Dispute Resolution Clause, Marcus Wang Jan 2009

Dancing With The Dragon: What U.S. Parties Should Know About Chinese Law When Drafting A Contractual Dispute Resolution Clause, Marcus Wang

Student Articles and Papers

This paper draws on scholarly and field research in both the United States and China to present a legal and practical primer for U.S. parties entering the Chinese marketplace.

As China's role in the global economy becomes more prominent, American companies are finding that doing business in China is necessary to retaining a competitive edge. As the number of transactions between American and Chinese companies increases, however, the number of potential disputes increases correspondingly. Unique legal and practical circumstances in China require a China-specific approach to managing such disputes.

The paper identifies one such approach – the use of ...


Eastphalia Rising?: Asian Influence And The Fate Of Human Security, David P. Fidler, Sung Won Kim, Sumit Ganguly Jan 2009

Eastphalia Rising?: Asian Influence And The Fate Of Human Security, David P. Fidler, Sung Won Kim, Sumit Ganguly

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Why The Chinese Public Prefer Administrative Petitioning Over Litigation, Taisu Zhang Jan 2009

Why The Chinese Public Prefer Administrative Petitioning Over Litigation, Taisu Zhang

Faculty Scholarship

In recent years, the Chinese public, when facing disputes with government officials, have preferred a non-legal means of resolution, the Xinfang system, over litigation. Some scholars explain this by claiming that administrative litigation is less effective than Xinfang petitioning. Others argue that the Chinese have historically eschewed litigation and continue to do so habitually. This paper proposes a new explanation: Chinese have traditionally litigated administrative disputes, but only when legal procedure is not too adversarial and allows for the possibility of reconciliation through court-directed settlement. Since this possibility does not formally exist in modern Chinese administrative litigation, people tend to ...


Banking Reform In The Chinese Mirror, Katharina Pistor Jan 2009

Banking Reform In The Chinese Mirror, Katharina Pistor

Faculty Scholarship

This paper analyzes the transactions that led to the partial privatization of China’s three largest banks in 2005-06. It suggests that these transactions were structured to allow for inter-organizational learning under conditions of uncertainty. For the involved foreign investors, participation in large financial intermediaries of central importance to the Chinese economy gave them the opportunity to learn about financial governance in China. For the Chinese banks partnering with more than one foreign investor, their participation allowed them to benefit from the input by different players in the global financial market place and to learn from the range of technical ...