Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Selected Works

Discipline
Keyword
Publication Year
Publication
File Type

Articles 31 - 60 of 4620

Full-Text Articles in History

Ohio's Bicentennial: Exploring Nearby History, Ronald G. Helms Ph.D., Marjorie L. Mclellan Jul 2019

Ohio's Bicentennial: Exploring Nearby History, Ronald G. Helms Ph.D., Marjorie L. Mclellan

Ronald Helms

Clearly, the Ohio Bicentennial is an important event for celebration. This article seeks to promote the Ohio Bicentennial by reviewing a project devoted to the local or public aspect of history. The focus of the project was the study of the history of Dayton, Ohio. Wright State University developed the Nearby History Institute, which brought public historians, social studies professors and researchers from area archives and museums together with faculty from the public schools, to rethink and strengthen American history teaching in the Miami Valley. The Ohio Humanities Council and the Martha Holden Jennings Foundation funded the institute.


Toward A Black Baseball League For Kansas City, 1890–1916: Proposals And Challenges, Mark E. Eberle Jul 2019

Toward A Black Baseball League For Kansas City, 1890–1916: Proposals And Challenges, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

Studies of Negro Leagues baseball from 1920 through the 1950s address various aspects of the organization and operation of the leagues, and provide portraits of the teams, players, and other prominent individuals. However, there were earlier attempts by black teams to organize leagues during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Given the many proposed and short-lived black leagues prior to 1920, the focus of this monograph is the proposals that included clubs from Kansas City. None of the leagues proposed before the First World War survived beyond its inaugural season, but the number of proposals offered over three decades reflects ...


Who’S On First? Kansas City’S Female Baseball Stars, 1899–1929, Mark E. Eberle Jul 2019

Who’S On First? Kansas City’S Female Baseball Stars, 1899–1929, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

Although female players were typically excluded from formal baseball teams, teams consisting entirely or partly of female players were organized across the country as early as the mid-1800s. The first female baseball club in Kansas and adjacent states was organized in Wichita in 1873. These early teams predated the arrival of the barnstorming teams with female players and usually one or more male players, who were sometimes disguised as women. Female players on most of these early traveling teams wore bloomers, and the teams were referred to as “bloomer girls.” Women on later teams wore traditional baseball uniforms and objected ...


Evans’ All-Nations And Mayetta Indians Baseball, 1917, Mark E. Eberle Jul 2019

Evans’ All-Nations And Mayetta Indians Baseball, 1917, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

On 4 April 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and prepared to enter what would later be referred to as the First World War. Those preparations would last through the summer, as many young men spent one last season playing baseball before leaving for Europe. Among these teams in northeastern Kansas were two local teams not composed solely of white players. The Evans’ All-Nations was an integrated team in Horton composed of white, black, American Indian, and possibly Mexican players. Jesse Evans, a local black barber, managed the team. About 25 miles southwest of Horton, on the Prairie ...


Here For Good: Anzac Spirituality, Daniel Reynaud Jul 2019

Here For Good: Anzac Spirituality, Daniel Reynaud

Daniel Reynaud

Here For Good is a podcast series from leading researchers at Avondale College of Higher Education. This episode features Anzac historian Associate Professor Daniel Reynaud in conversation with Associate Dean (Research) Dr Carolyn Rickett.


"Saper La Mente Della Soa Beatitudine": Pope Paul Ii And The Ambassadorial Community In Rome (1464-71), Paul M. Dover Jul 2019

"Saper La Mente Della Soa Beatitudine": Pope Paul Ii And The Ambassadorial Community In Rome (1464-71), Paul M. Dover

Paul Dover

This article examines the practice of the ambassadors sent by the Italian states to the court of Pope Paul II (1464-1471), focusing in particular on how they have embraced their role as an informant. Since Paul was a pope unstable, often impenetrable and inaccessible, the ambassadors were often obliged to obtain information about the Pope and his intentions indirectly. Relying heavily on the Roman diplomatic correspondence during the pontificate of Paul, this article shows how ambassadors have built networks of contacts within the papal court to ensure a continuous supply of useful information and in time. These networks thus comprised ...


Royal Diplomacy In Renaissance Italy: Ferrante D’Aragona (1458–1494) And His Ambassadors, Paul M. Dover Jul 2019

Royal Diplomacy In Renaissance Italy: Ferrante D’Aragona (1458–1494) And His Ambassadors, Paul M. Dover

Paul Dover

This article examines the diplomatic challenges faced by the king of Naples, Ferrante d'Aragona (1458-1494) and the activity of his ambassadors in meeting those challenges. It identifies Rome, Florence and Milan as the three most important nodes of Ferrante's diplomacy and looks in detail at the activity of the ambassadors who served in these postings. In the area of diplomatic praxis, Ferrante enthusiastically embraced changes pioneered by Francesco Sforza, the Duke of Milan (1450-1466), including the use of permanent resident ambassadors and diplomatic chanceries. This was very much in keeping with Ferrante's pragmatic approach to statecraft and ...


The Great War Centenary Tour: Summer 2014, Ronald G. Helms Ph.D. Jul 2019

The Great War Centenary Tour: Summer 2014, Ronald G. Helms Ph.D.

Ronald Helms

In addition to visiting Key WWI sites in Belgium and France, the 2014-2018 The Great War Centenary Tour included the Bayeux Tapestry, depicting the victory of William the Conqueror in the Battle of Hastings of 1066; a visit to one of France’s most iconic attractions: Mont Saint-Michel; Bruges, Belgium one of the best preserved medieval towns in all of Europe; as well as the beaches of the D-Day landings with visits at several German bunkers, the Pegasus Bridge, and the Arromanches landing site; and a visit the Omaha Beach site and museum before moving on to Pont du Hoc ...


From The Trenches: Cross-Campus Digital History Collaboration, Amy E. Lucadamo, Ian A. Isherwood, R.C. Miessler, Jenna Fleming, Meghan E. O'Donnell Jul 2019

From The Trenches: Cross-Campus Digital History Collaboration, Amy E. Lucadamo, Ian A. Isherwood, R.C. Miessler, Jenna Fleming, Meghan E. O'Donnell

R.C. Miessler

In September 2015, our team launched The First World War Letters of H.J.C. Peirs (www.jackpeirs.org), a digital history initiative built on collaboration between faculty, students, and library staff. The project is founded on amazing primary source material, but with limited financial support and little dedicated staff time. We leveraged the creativity and hard work of our team members to build a website that is maintained by students and enhanced whenever possible with features and commentary from faculty and staff. Members of #TeamPeirs discussed the evolution of the project, the nature of our collaboration, and the intersection ...


Running Wires: Digital History In The Classroom And The Field, Ian A. Isherwood, Amy E. Lucadamo, R.C. Miessler Jul 2019

Running Wires: Digital History In The Classroom And The Field, Ian A. Isherwood, Amy E. Lucadamo, R.C. Miessler

R.C. Miessler

The First World War Letters of H.J.C. Peirs is a digital history project that publishes the letters of a British World War I officer 100 years to the day they were written. By telling the story of one person, we have aimed to humanize a dehumanizing war and supported the effort to commemorate the centennial of the conflict. While the project was conceived with pedagogy in mind, it has grown beyond the letters and crossed boundaries: from the analog to the digital, from the classroom to the public, and from the archives to the field.


Black Baseball In Kansas City, 1870–1899, Mark E. Eberle Jul 2019

Black Baseball In Kansas City, 1870–1899, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

The Kansas City Monarchs, a black baseball team founded by J.L. Wilkinson in 1920, is one of the storied franchises of Negro Leagues history. The story of black baseball clubs and players in Kansas City prior to the First World War is less known, yet it forms the foundation on which the 1920 Monarchs were established. The story of early black baseball in Kansas City from 1870 through 1899 is summarized here. Among the clubs to take the field were the Kansas City Maroons and their star catcher, Frank Maupin. Former classmates organized the Lincoln High Schools in 1899 ...


‘Do You Know Who You Are?’, Amanda Black Jul 2019

‘Do You Know Who You Are?’, Amanda Black

Amanda Black

As I reflect on Black History Month and how it has shaped and continues to shape American history, I’m struck with the importance of students getting to know their past. As they read about and witness injustices throughout the world, students have awakened to the realization that a fuller understanding the history of their own country can provide more detailed context for their own experiences. This type of research can not only provide a sense of identity, but also equip them with knowledge and perspective as they work to dismantle systems of inequality.


Walking Titanic's Charity Trail In New York City: Part One, Gramercy Park And Madison Square Park, Eric C. Cimino Ph.D. Jun 2019

Walking Titanic's Charity Trail In New York City: Part One, Gramercy Park And Madison Square Park, Eric C. Cimino Ph.D.

Eric C. Cimino

This article combines insights form travel writing, history, and urban studies to explore the social welfare milieu of early twentieth century New York City and its connection to disaster relief efforts for Titanic survivors in 1912.


Tale Of A Manuscript, Rowan Cahill May 2019

Tale Of A Manuscript, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

An account of the origins, contexts, and fate of a 'lost' manuscript by Australian historian/civil libertarian Brian Fitzpatrick (1905-1965), produced during the early years of the Cold War, titled 'The Seamen's Union of Australia: A Short History'.


The People In The Papers: The Seaman Identification Card Of Joseph Sofka, Elizabeth D. James May 2019

The People In The Papers: The Seaman Identification Card Of Joseph Sofka, Elizabeth D. James

Elizabeth D. James

According to the enclosed documents, at the age of eighteen, Joseph Sofka enlisted as a Merchant Marine in Pittsburgh after traveling there from his hometown of Wheeling. A frequently little known branch of the armed forces, Merchant Marines were responsible for ferrying cargo from the United States to the front lines in Europe and the Pacific, and were instrumental in maintaining supply lines to sustain the troops overseas. Merchant Marine ships had to avoid submarines, ships, and mines from the enemy, making a seemingly simple task into a deadly effort. As a result, the Merchant Marines had the highest casualty ...


Heritage And Identity: The Cockayne Family Bible, Elizabeth James May 2019

Heritage And Identity: The Cockayne Family Bible, Elizabeth James

Elizabeth D. James

The collection at the Cockayne Farmstead is eclectic, to say the least. Ranging in age from Adena arrowheads to a 2001 calendar, it is difficult to characterize the nature of the home’s archival holdings. However, amidst a plethora of nineteenth century correspondence, books, and printed ephemera, one item stands out as being particularly special. Within the collection is a Bible printed in 1775 on the Cambridge University Press in England, complete with a hurriedly scrawled listing of family birth and death dates on the back of the title page. This brief listing demonstrates how books were used for purposes ...


Final Draft.Pdf, Carmen Mena May 2019

Final Draft.Pdf, Carmen Mena

Carmen Mena

No abstract provided.


Ptolemaic Elephants In Iii Maccabees And The Social Stratification Of The Kingdom Of Kush, Leslie Sam May 2019

Ptolemaic Elephants In Iii Maccabees And The Social Stratification Of The Kingdom Of Kush, Leslie Sam

Leslie Sam

Trade helped to catapult early societies from hunter gatherers – living in small communities of friends and family – to living in sprawling urban environments of ideas and exchange. Socialization and the exchange of ideas – and war—molded our modern times into what it is now. Ancient Nubia found itself in a conundrum that would test their resolve. Ptolemaic-ran Egypt was at their border, forcing themselves in as conquerors, unapologetic towards the millennia old culture that contributed much to their society. With a truce made between the Greeks and Meroe, trade was inevitably was enacted between the two power houses, helping to ...


The True University: Yale's Library From 1843 To 1931, Elizabeth D. James May 2019

The True University: Yale's Library From 1843 To 1931, Elizabeth D. James

Elizabeth D. James

By the summer of 1930, Sterling Memorial Library was nearing completion, lacking only the university’s 1.6 million books. At 6:00 AM on July 7, with a ceremonial parade of the library’s earliest accessions, the two-month project of moving the books commenced. Leading the trail of librarians was the head librarian, Andrew Keogh, and the head of the serials cataloguing department, Grace Pierpont Fuller. Fuller was the descendant of James Pierpont, one of the principal founders of Yale, and was carrying the Latin Bible given by her ancestor during the fabled 1701 donation of books that signaled ...


'An Unpopular Cause' The Uaw's Support For Aboriginal Rights.Pdf, Lisa Milner Apr 2019

'An Unpopular Cause' The Uaw's Support For Aboriginal Rights.Pdf, Lisa Milner

Dr Lisa Milner

The Union of Australian Women (UAW) was a national organisation for left-wing women between World War II and the emergence of the women’s liberation movement. Along with other left-wing activists, UAW members supported Aboriginal rights, through their policies, publications and actions. They also attracted a number of Aboriginal members including Pearl Gibbs, Gladys O’Shane, Dulcie Flower and Faith Bandler. Focusing on NSW activity in the assimilation period, this article argues that the strong support of UAW members for Aboriginal rights drew upon the group’s establishment far-left politics, its relations with other women’s groups and the activism ...


A Jewish Agent In Eighteenth-Century Paris: Israël Bernard De Valabrègue, Ronald Schechter Apr 2019

A Jewish Agent In Eighteenth-Century Paris: Israël Bernard De Valabrègue, Ronald Schechter

Ronald Schechter

No abstract provided.


Mendoza The Jew: Boxing, Manliness And Nationalism, Ronald Schechter, Liz Clarke Apr 2019

Mendoza The Jew: Boxing, Manliness And Nationalism, Ronald Schechter, Liz Clarke

Ronald Schechter

Inspired by the resounding success of Abina and the Important Men (OUP, 2011), Mendoza the Jewcombines a graphic history with primary documentation and contextual information to explore issues of nationalism, identity, culture, and historical methodology through the life story of Daniel Mendoza. Mendoza was a poor Sephardic Jew from East London who became the boxing champion of Britain in 1789. As a Jew with limited means and a foreign-sounding name, Mendoza was an unlikely symbol of what many Britons considered to be their very own "national" sport. Whereas their adversaries across the Channel reputedly settled private quarrels by dueling ...


Crossing Boundaries: The Significance Of French Jewish History, Ronald Schechter Apr 2019

Crossing Boundaries: The Significance Of French Jewish History, Ronald Schechter

Ronald Schechter

No abstract provided.


An Analysis Of Whether Victorian England Shares Central Tenets Of Modern Rape Culture, Emily Murray Apr 2019

An Analysis Of Whether Victorian England Shares Central Tenets Of Modern Rape Culture, Emily Murray

Emily Murray

This work observes examples of sexual objectification and victim blaming from both the modern and Victorian eras to analyze whether Victorian England can possibly be described as a rape culture.


No Witness, No Case: An Assessment Of The Conduct And Quality Of Icc Investigations, Dermot Groome Apr 2019

No Witness, No Case: An Assessment Of The Conduct And Quality Of Icc Investigations, Dermot Groome

Dermot M Groome

The conduct and quality of investigations pursued by the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court have come under increasing scrutiny and criticism from judges on the Court. Criticism is directed at the time and length of investigations; the quality of the evidence advanced in court; the inappropriate delegation of investigative functions, and the failure to interview witnesses in a way that is consistent with the Prosecution’s obligation to conduct investigations fairly under Article 54 of the Rome Statute. This essay explores these criticisms and concludes that the judges are justified in their concerns regarding the Prosecution ...


Competing Proposals For The Regeneration Of The Jews, Ronald Schechter Apr 2019

Competing Proposals For The Regeneration Of The Jews, Ronald Schechter

Ronald Schechter

No abstract provided.


Terror, Vengeance And Martyrdom In The French Revolution: The Case Of The Shades, Ronald Schechter Apr 2019

Terror, Vengeance And Martyrdom In The French Revolution: The Case Of The Shades, Ronald Schechter

Ronald Schechter

In recent years, terrorism has become closely associated with martyrdom in the minds of many terrorists and in the view of nations around the world. In Islam, martyrdom is mostly conceived as "bearing witness" to faith and God. Martyrdom is also central to the Christian tradition, not only in the form of Christ's Passion or saints faced with persecution and death, but in the duty to lead a good and charitable life. In both religions, the association of religious martyrdom with political terror has a long and difficult history. The essays of this volume illuminate this history--following, for example ...


The French Revolution: The Essential Readings, Ronald Schechter Apr 2019

The French Revolution: The Essential Readings, Ronald Schechter

Ronald Schechter

This book presents ten selections from the most important scholarship on the French Revolution over the past quarter century, introduced and contextualized for student readers.

Historians typically categorize the historiography of the French Revolution according to each author's approval or disapproval of the Revolution, political agenda (for example Marxist, liberal, conservative, or feminist), or methodology (for example social, political, or cultural history). This book demonstrates the inadequacy of these categories of analysis for a nuanced understanding of the Revolution and emphasizes the surprising connections between historians typically seen simply as opponents in a debate. In its thorough introduction, The ...


Gothic Thermidor: The Bals Des Victimes, The Fantastic, And The Production Of Historical Knowledge In Post-Terror France, Ronald Schechter Apr 2019

Gothic Thermidor: The Bals Des Victimes, The Fantastic, And The Production Of Historical Knowledge In Post-Terror France, Ronald Schechter

Ronald Schechter

No abstract provided.


Review Of Port Kembla: A Memoir (2019) - A Local History That Captures The Diversity Of Australia, Rowan Cahill Apr 2019

Review Of Port Kembla: A Memoir (2019) - A Local History That Captures The Diversity Of Australia, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Review of the book by Pam Menzies, 'Port Kembla: A Memoir', an account of the history of the industrial town of Port Kembla on the South Coast of New South Wales, Australia. In the process of reviewing the book, Cahill ruminates on the nature of 'local history' as a cultural industry in Australia, and as a democratic activity.