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American Studies

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Full-Text Articles in History

Prophetic Rhetoric And Natural Rights - Mlk Mountaintop.Pptx, Jon P. Radwan Oct 2018

Prophetic Rhetoric And Natural Rights - Mlk Mountaintop.Pptx, Jon P. Radwan

Jon P. Radwan

No abstract provided.


Goose Hollow Mar 2018

Goose Hollow

Tracy J. Prince

One of the oldest neighborhoods in Portland, Goose Hollow has a fascinating history of roving bands of geese, the Great Plank Road, the tannery that helped put Portland on the map, blue-collar immigrants in the hollow, rich merchants in the heights, Chinese-American vegetable gardeners, and Native American traders living near the Chinese gardeners. 

The name of Goose Hollow, one of the oldest neighborhoods in Portland, first referred to the area around a hollow carved out by Tanner Creek. Since the mid 1970s, however, when the neighborhood association was formed, the name has applied to the larger neighborhood of flats and ...


Review Of Frontier Feminist: Clarina Howard Nichols And The Politics Of Motherhood By Marilyn S. Blackwell And Kristen T. Oertel, Barbara Cutter Mar 2018

Review Of Frontier Feminist: Clarina Howard Nichols And The Politics Of Motherhood By Marilyn S. Blackwell And Kristen T. Oertel, Barbara Cutter

Barbara Cutter

After a difficult first marriage that ended in divorce, Clarina Irene Howard Nichols became an avid supporter of married women's property rights, mothers' custody rights, and, eventually, female suffrage. She was a journalist, a newspaper editor, and in 1852 she became the first woman to speak to the Vermont state legislature, in an address in favor of women's school suffrage. By 1853, she was traveling through the Northeast and Midwest as a public lecturer on temperance and women's rights. She emigrated to Kansas in 1854 as a strong advocate of the free soil cause, but also because ...


Sacred Heart University Celebrates Mlk, Encourages Students To ‘Stay Woke’ Jan 2018

Sacred Heart University Celebrates Mlk, Encourages Students To ‘Stay Woke’

Karreem Mebane

Sacred Heart University students, faculty and staff gathered in University Commons recently for a celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. that focused on being aware, calling out injustices and creating change.
The event, “Celebration and Reflection: The Many Voices of Social Justice,”—which took place two days after what would have been King’s 89th birthday—was moderated by Karreem Mebane, director of Volunteer Programs and Service Learning.


Edward Elbridge Salisbury, 1814-1901, Robin Dougherty Dec 2017

Edward Elbridge Salisbury, 1814-1901, Robin Dougherty

Roberta L. Dougherty

No abstract provided.


Review Of Discovering Indigenous Lands: The Doctrine Of Discovery In The English Colonies By Robert J. Miller, Jacinta Ruru, Larissa Behrendt, And Tracey Lindberg, Blake A. Watson Nov 2017

Review Of Discovering Indigenous Lands: The Doctrine Of Discovery In The English Colonies By Robert J. Miller, Jacinta Ruru, Larissa Behrendt, And Tracey Lindberg, Blake A. Watson

Blake A Watson

The Doctrine of Discovery provides that colonizing European nations automatically acquired certain property, governmental, and commercial rights over Indigenous inhabitants. In recent years, Indigenous peoples, legal scholars, religious institutions, and nongovernmental organizations have pressed for official repudiation of the Doctrine. In 2007, the United Nations voted (over the initial opposition of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States) to adopt the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which contains several provisions that acknowledge the rights of Indigenous peoples to their lands. In 2012, the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples will devote its Eleventh Session to a study ...


Ligia Grischa: A Successful Swiss Colony On The Dakota Territory Frontier, Todd Quinn, Karl Benedict, Jeff Dickey Oct 2017

Ligia Grischa: A Successful Swiss Colony On The Dakota Territory Frontier, Todd Quinn, Karl Benedict, Jeff Dickey

Todd Quinn

In 1877 a small group of Swiss immigrants from the Graubunden canton formed a cooperative with another Swiss group in Stillwater, Minnesota, to begin a colony in eastern South Dakota. These settlers founded the Badus Swiss colony on the open prairie in Lake County, Dakota Territory {later South Dakota}, based on cooperative rules written in Switzerland in 1424. This settlement was one of the last Swiss colonies created in the United States during the great nineteenth-century European migration, and one of the westernmost Swiss settlements in the United States. There were two major factors that contributed to the Badus Swiss ...


End Of Paragraph, Rowan Cahill Aug 2017

End Of Paragraph, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

A tribute to the life and work of US journalist, author, soldier, script writer, leftist activist, Clancy Sigal (1926-2017), with particular reference to his novel/memoir Going Away (1962).


J. C. Penney: The Man, The Store And American Agriculture, David Delbert Kruger May 2017

J. C. Penney: The Man, The Store And American Agriculture, David Delbert Kruger

David Delbert Kruger

Amazon is now providing hardcover and Kindle versions of this book:



Visionary Science Of The “Harvard Barbarians”, Catherine Schmitt Mar 2017

Visionary Science Of The “Harvard Barbarians”, Catherine Schmitt

Catherine Schmitt

For over two months during the summer of 1880, eight young members of the Champlain Society made daily excursions, on foot and by boat, around Mount Desert Island. They collected plants and birds, and dredged small animals from the mud of Somes Sound. They stared at the rocks along shore and took photographs. Under the leadership of “Captain” Charles Eliot, son of Harvard President Charles William Eliot, the students were on the Island for the summer to “do some work in some branch of natural history or science.”


Hawley-Green Street National Register Historic District Boundary Expansion Syracuse Onondaga Co, Samuel D. Gruber Dr. Aug 2016

Hawley-Green Street National Register Historic District Boundary Expansion Syracuse Onondaga Co, Samuel D. Gruber Dr.

Samuel D. Gruber, Ph.D.

Provides a history and descriptive building list of the Hawley-Green Street neighborhood in Syracuse, NY and add over 100 properties ot the existing historic district established in 1979.


The Hillbilly In The Living Room: Television Representations Of Southern Mountaineers In Situation Comedies, 1952-1971, Anthony Harkins Jul 2016

The Hillbilly In The Living Room: Television Representations Of Southern Mountaineers In Situation Comedies, 1952-1971, Anthony Harkins

Anthony Harkins

No abstract provided.


Session A-3: Across The Wide Missouri: Illinois & Early Exploration Of The Trans-Mississippi West, Claiborne A. Skinner Jr. Jul 2016

Session A-3: Across The Wide Missouri: Illinois & Early Exploration Of The Trans-Mississippi West, Claiborne A. Skinner Jr.

Claiborne A. Skinner Jr.

Illinois History is often perceived as a contradiction in terms. Until the arrival of Abraham Lincoln, most folks think that nothing of any note happened here. This presentation will address the French traders and explorers from the Illinois Country who pushed west up the Missouri and Arkansas Rivers in the century preceding Lewis and Clark's more famous jaunt. The two knew of these French travelers only too well and recruited a half dozen Illinois French at Fort Massac and Kaskaskia to show them how to get to the "unknown". The effect these men had on the Plains was profound.


The Significance Of ‘Hillbilly’ In Early Country Music, 1924-1945, Anthony Harkins Jul 2016

The Significance Of ‘Hillbilly’ In Early Country Music, 1924-1945, Anthony Harkins

Anthony Harkins

No abstract provided.


Colonels, Hillbillies And Fightin’: Twentieth-Century Kentucky In The National Imagination, Anthony Harkins Jul 2016

Colonels, Hillbillies And Fightin’: Twentieth-Century Kentucky In The National Imagination, Anthony Harkins

Anthony Harkins

No abstract provided.


The Tourist Experience In Boston, 1848-1910: American History, Middle-Class Leisure And The Development Of Urban Tourism, Hillary Corbett Jul 2016

The Tourist Experience In Boston, 1848-1910: American History, Middle-Class Leisure And The Development Of Urban Tourism, Hillary Corbett

Hillary Corbett

This project analyzes a selection of representative guidebooks produced between 1848 and 1910, to illustrate the development of a tourist industry in Boston and to indicate how the changing nature of the city influenced a similar change in the tourist experience. It also provides the necessary context in which to place this narrative. Part I introduces two key elements essential to understanding the relevance of urban tourism in Boston: the city’s experiences with the national phenomena of electrification and urban planning in the mid- to late-nineteenth century, and Boston’s distinctive role in nineteenth-century America’s developing national identity ...


Commies, H-Bombs And The National Security State: The Cold War In The Comics, Anthony Harkins Jul 2016

Commies, H-Bombs And The National Security State: The Cold War In The Comics, Anthony Harkins

Anthony Harkins

No abstract provided.


From ‘Sweet Mamas’ To ‘Bodacious’ Hillbillies: Billy Debeck’S Impact On American Culture, Anthony Harkins Jul 2016

From ‘Sweet Mamas’ To ‘Bodacious’ Hillbillies: Billy Debeck’S Impact On American Culture, Anthony Harkins

Anthony Harkins

No abstract provided.


The Hillbilly In The American Imagination, Anthony Harkins Jul 2016

The Hillbilly In The American Imagination, Anthony Harkins

Anthony Harkins

No abstract provided.


Our Leschi: The Making Of A Martyr, Alexander Olson Jul 2016

Our Leschi: The Making Of A Martyr, Alexander Olson

Alexander Olson

In1929, Nisqually Indians erected a tombstone over the grave of Leschi, a former tribal leader who had been executed in 1858 for the murder of a local white man. Leschi's remains were moved to the gravesite in 1917 after the federal government had condemned his previous resting place, on the Nisqually reservation, for an expansion of Fort Lewis. This was the second time that Leschi had been reburied. In 1895, his remains had been moved from his original gravesite just outside the reservation boundaries. His memorialists knew better than to inscribe "Rest in peace" on his tombstone.


Review: 'Fighting Traffic: The Dawn Of The Motor Age In The American City', John Alfred Heitmann Jun 2016

Review: 'Fighting Traffic: The Dawn Of The Motor Age In The American City', John Alfred Heitmann

John A. Heitmann

During the early 1960s, as the Golden Age of the automobile in America began to wane, several commentators, including Lewis Mumford, raised the critical question of whether the automobile existed for the modern city or the city for the automobile. How and when the automobile became central to urban life is deftly addressed in Peter Norton’s Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City. This study is certainly one of the most important monographs focusing on the place of the automobile in American society within a historical context to appear in recent times; it interestingly ...


Review: 'Storied Independent Automakers: Nash, Hudson, And American Motors', John Alfred Heitmann Jun 2016

Review: 'Storied Independent Automakers: Nash, Hudson, And American Motors', John Alfred Heitmann

John A. Heitmann

Nash, Hudson, and now even American Motors are automobile brands that have largely disappeared from the American memory. Yet, despite riding the twentieth-century economic roller coaster and operating in the shadow of the Big Three, these firms made sustained, significant technological and economic contributions. Charles K. Hyde’s Storied Independent Automakers is the author’s latest foray into the area of automotive business history, following work on the Chrysler Corporation and the Dodge brothers. A professor of History at Wayne State University, Hyde has written a needed critical business history on an important topic that complements the vast amount of ...


Lineages Of The Literary Left: Essays In Honor Of Alan M. Wald, Howard Brick, Robbie Lieberman, Paula Rabinowitz Apr 2016

Lineages Of The Literary Left: Essays In Honor Of Alan M. Wald, Howard Brick, Robbie Lieberman, Paula Rabinowitz

Robbie Lieberman

For nearly half a century, Alan M. Wald’s pathbreaking research has demonstrated that attention to the complex lived experiences of writers on the Left provides a new context for viewing major achievements as well as instructive minor ones in United States fiction, poetry, drama, and criticism. His many publications have illuminated the creative lives of figures such as James T. Farrell, Willard Motley, Muriel Rukeyser, Philip Rahv, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, Kenneth Fearing, and Arthur Miller. He has delved into a consideration of Sidney Hook and pragmatism, brought attention to debates within tendencies associated with Cannonism and Shachtmanism, and ...


"A Date Which Will Live In Infamy": College Newspaper Reporting Of U.S. Entry Into Wwii, Jill J. Crane, Marcella Lesher Mar 2016

"A Date Which Will Live In Infamy": College Newspaper Reporting Of U.S. Entry Into Wwii, Jill J. Crane, Marcella Lesher

Jill J Crane

No abstract provided.


Bringing Books To A "Book-Hungry Land": Print Culture On The Dakota Prairie, Lisa Lindell Mar 2016

Bringing Books To A "Book-Hungry Land": Print Culture On The Dakota Prairie, Lisa Lindell

Lisa R. Lindell

The dearth of reading material was a recurring lament in the writings and memoirs of Dakota settlers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. “I was born with a desire to read, . . . and I have never gotten over it,” declared Henry Theodore Washburn, recalling his Minnesota boyhood and homesteading years in Dakota Territory, “but there was no way in those days to gratify that desire to any great extent.”1 This lack was indeed of consequence. In the pre-electronic era, print was a primary means of obtaining information, insight, and pleasure. High rates of literacy, sharp increases in book ...


"So Long As I Can Read": Farm Women's Reading Experiences In Depression-Era South Dakota, Lisa Lindell Feb 2016

"So Long As I Can Read": Farm Women's Reading Experiences In Depression-Era South Dakota, Lisa Lindell

Lisa R. Lindell

During the Great Depression, with conditions grim, entertainment scarce, and educational opportunities limited, many South Dakota farm women relied on reading to fill emotional, social, and informational needs. To read to any degree, these rural women had to overcome multiple obstacles. Extensive reading (whether books, farm journals, or newspapers) was limited to those who had access to publications and could make time to read. The South Dakota Free Library Commission was valuable in circulating reading materials to the state's rural population. In the 1930s the commission collaborated with the USDA's Extension Service in a popular reading project geared ...


Inviting Us To Come Closer: Philip Levine's Portraits Of Detroit (Forthcoming), Christina Triezenberg Dec 2015

Inviting Us To Come Closer: Philip Levine's Portraits Of Detroit (Forthcoming), Christina Triezenberg

Christina Triezenberg

No abstract provided.


Dying To Better Themselves: West Indians And The Building Of The Panama Canal, Written By Olive Senior, Michael L. Conniff Dec 2015

Dying To Better Themselves: West Indians And The Building Of The Panama Canal, Written By Olive Senior, Michael L. Conniff

Michael L. Conniff

A book review of Dying to Better Themselves: West Indians and the Building of the Panama Canal, by Olive Senior. Kingston: University of the West Indies Press, 2014. xxiii + 416 pp. (Paper US$ 40.00)


Teaching To American History Survey, William Scott Nov 2015

Teaching To American History Survey, William Scott

Will Scott

No abstract provided.


Une Amérique Française, 1760-1860: Dynamiques Du Corridor Créole, Guillaume Teasdale, Tangi Villerbu Nov 2015

Une Amérique Française, 1760-1860: Dynamiques Du Corridor Créole, Guillaume Teasdale, Tangi Villerbu

Guillaume Teasdale

De la Louisiane à Détroit, en passant par Sainte-Geneviève, Saint-Louis ou Vincennes, ce sont tous les pôles de développement de cette Amérique française qui sont analysés, du temps des révolutions atlantiques à la veille de la Guerre de Sécession quand les Etats-Unis cherchent encore la meilleure définition d'eux-mêmes et que les francophones doivent trouver leur place dans les évolutions de la jeune République. En croisant l'histoire culturelle et celles des relations internationales, les approches genrées et l'histoire des missionaires, l'histoire des réseaux migratoires et celle du patrimoine, la question de la langue et celle du métissage ...