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Full-Text Articles in History

All Things To All People, Part One, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Dec 2104

All Things To All People, Part One, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic has identified the fundamental predicate of Government I, which operated, more or less, under Constitution I, the Constutiton of the year One, as a disposable government. See The Standard Model at War, 17 OCL 350. if government asserts, affirmatively, that it is disposable, isn’t it also asserting that it can replicate its systems (= structures political society) at will? OCL builds on its assertion of political society as a three-goaled contrivance. See Why Do Political Societies Exist? 2 OCL 883. Isn’t such a government asserting the primacy of the needs of civil society? By offering to ...


A Railway, A City, And The Public Regulation Of Private Property: Cpr V. City Of Vancouver, Douglas C. Harris Oct 2019

A Railway, A City, And The Public Regulation Of Private Property: Cpr V. City Of Vancouver, Douglas C. Harris

Douglas C Harris

The doctrine of regulatory or constructive taking establishes limits on the public regulation of private property in much of the common law world. When public regulation becomes unduly onerous — so as, in effect, to take a property interest from a private owner — the public will be required to compensate the owner for its loss. In 2000, the City of Vancouver passed a by-law that limited the use of a century-old rail line to a public thoroughfare. The Canadian Pacific Railway, which owned the line, claimed the regulation amounted to a taking of its property for which the city should pay ...


Death In The Haymarket: A Story Of Chicago, The First Labor Movement And The Bombing That Divided Gilded Age America, David M. Anderson Sep 2019

Death In The Haymarket: A Story Of Chicago, The First Labor Movement And The Bombing That Divided Gilded Age America, David M. Anderson

David Anderson

Review of: "Death in the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement, and the Bombing that Divided Gilded Age America," by James Green.


Radical Unionism In The Midwest, 1900–1950, David M. Anderson Sep 2019

Radical Unionism In The Midwest, 1900–1950, David M. Anderson

David Anderson

Review of: "Radical Unionism in the Midwest, 1900–1950," by Rosemary Feurer.


Brief Of Scholars Of Mormon History & Law As Amici Curiae In Support Of Neither Party, Anna-Rose Mathieson, Ben Feuer, Nathan B. Oman Sep 2019

Brief Of Scholars Of Mormon History & Law As Amici Curiae In Support Of Neither Party, Anna-Rose Mathieson, Ben Feuer, Nathan B. Oman

Nathan B. Oman

No abstract provided.


Amici Curiae Brief Of Scholars Of Mormon History & Law In Support Of Neither Party, Anna-Rose Mathieson, Nathan B. Oman Sep 2019

Amici Curiae Brief Of Scholars Of Mormon History & Law In Support Of Neither Party, Anna-Rose Mathieson, Nathan B. Oman

Nathan B. Oman

No abstract provided.


Amici Curiae Brief Of Scholars Of American Religious History & Law In Support Of Neither Party, Nathan B. Oman, Anna-Rose Mathieson Sep 2019

Amici Curiae Brief Of Scholars Of American Religious History & Law In Support Of Neither Party, Nathan B. Oman, Anna-Rose Mathieson

Nathan B. Oman

No abstract provided.


English Justices And Roman Jurists: The Civilian Learning Behind England's First Case Law, Thomas J. Mcsweeney Sep 2019

English Justices And Roman Jurists: The Civilian Learning Behind England's First Case Law, Thomas J. Mcsweeney

Thomas J. McSweeney

Article looks at a historical problem—the first use of case law by English royal justices in the thirteenth century—and makes it a starting point for thinking about the ways legal reasoning works in the modern common law. In the first Part of the Article, I show that, at its origin, the English justices’ use of decided cases as a source of law was inspired by the work civil and canon law scholars were doing with written authorities in the medieval universities. In an attempt to make the case that English law was on par with civil law and ...


Book Review Of, The Invisible Empire In The West: Toward A New Historical Appraisal Of The Ku Klux Klan Of The 1920s, Darrell Millner Sep 2019

Book Review Of, The Invisible Empire In The West: Toward A New Historical Appraisal Of The Ku Klux Klan Of The 1920s, Darrell Millner

Darrell M. Millner

Reviews the book "The Invisible Empire in the West: Toward a New Historical Appraisal of the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s" by Shawn Lay


Pyrrhonism Or Academic Skepticism? Friedrich Wilhelm Bierling’S ‘Reasonable Doubt’ In The Commentatio De Pyrrhonismo Historico (1724), Anton Matytsin Sep 2019

Pyrrhonism Or Academic Skepticism? Friedrich Wilhelm Bierling’S ‘Reasonable Doubt’ In The Commentatio De Pyrrhonismo Historico (1724), Anton Matytsin

Anton Matytsin

No abstract provided.


Rotuli Parisienses: Supplications To The Pope From The University Of Paris, Volume 3: 1387-1394, 2 Vols. Edited By William J. Courtenay And Eric D. Goddard, Alex J. Novikoff Sep 2019

Rotuli Parisienses: Supplications To The Pope From The University Of Paris, Volume 3: 1387-1394, 2 Vols. Edited By William J. Courtenay And Eric D. Goddard, Alex J. Novikoff

Alex Novikoff

No abstract provided.


Terror In The Heart Of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, And The Meaning Of Race In The Postemancipation South, Hannah Rosen Sep 2019

Terror In The Heart Of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, And The Meaning Of Race In The Postemancipation South, Hannah Rosen

Hannah Rosen

The meaning of race in the antebellum southern United States was anchored in the racial exclusivity of slavery (coded as black) and full citizenship (coded as white as well as male). These traditional definitions of race were radically disrupted after emancipation, when citizenship was granted to all persons born in the United States and suffrage was extended to all men. Hannah Rosen persuasively argues that in this critical moment of Reconstruction, contests over the future meaning of race were often fought on the terrain of gender.

Sexual violence--specifically, white-on-black rape--emerged as a critical arena in postemancipation struggles over African American ...


Protecting All Animals: A Fifty-Year History Of The Humane Society Of The United States, Bernard Unti Sep 2019

Protecting All Animals: A Fifty-Year History Of The Humane Society Of The United States, Bernard Unti

Bernard Unti, PhD

In 1954, when The Humane Society of the United States was founded by a small handful of dedicated visionaries, the modern concept of "animal welfare" barely existed. Fifty years later, The HSUS is the nation's largest animal protection organization, with a constituency of more than 8 million people, and a leader in the parallel rise of the modern animal welfare movement. Protecting All Animals: A Fifty-Year History of The Humane Society of the United States is more than a chronicle of one organization; it is the saga of the journey toward a truly humane society.


Sugar Creek Style Research Essay, Michael Belding Iii Sep 2019

Sugar Creek Style Research Essay, Michael Belding Iii

Michael Belding III

The following is a research essay assignment asking students to write a research essay in the style of John Mack Faragher's Sugar Creek on the Ames, Iowa area. The assignment includes a style guide along with a prescribed bibliography for students to work from.


Syllabus For Survey Of United States History I, Michael Belding Iii Sep 2019

Syllabus For Survey Of United States History I, Michael Belding Iii

Michael Belding III

The following is a syllabus created for a survey course of United States history covering Colonial foundations: revolution, confederation, and constitution; nationalism and democracy; sectional disunity, Civil War, and reunion.


The Farmers' Millennium: The Ideology Of Agricultural Improvement In Iowa, 1855 To 1865, Michael Belding Iii Aug 2019

The Farmers' Millennium: The Ideology Of Agricultural Improvement In Iowa, 1855 To 1865, Michael Belding Iii

Michael Belding III

The Morrill Act of 1862, a piece of federal legislation enacted a century and a half ago, lives on today. That law allocated thousands of acres of federal land to state governments, based on the size of their congressional delegations, so they could establish colleges of agriculture and the mechanic arts and give a college education, liberal and practical, to students who could not otherwise afford one. The Morrill Act lives on because the "land-grant colleges" it endowed with financial resources still exist today, operating on billion-dollar budgets and enrolling tens of thousands of students. Further, at least at Iowa ...


Book Review: Encounter On The Great Plains: Scandinavian Settlers And The Dispossession Of Dakota Indians, 1890-1930 By Karen V. Hansen, Sebastian Braun Aug 2019

Book Review: Encounter On The Great Plains: Scandinavian Settlers And The Dispossession Of Dakota Indians, 1890-1930 By Karen V. Hansen, Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

In Encounter on the Great Plains, Karen Hansen investigates Scandinavian immigrants and settlers who came to live on the post-allotment Spirit Lake Reservation in North Dakota. She does so through examining stories by Scandinavian as well as Dakota residents. As the subtitle indicates, Hansen is interested in the question of dispossession: Did the Scandinavians, among whom were her ancestors, contribute to the dispossession of the Dakotas? As she writes, “[w]hat does it mean when one group’s acquisition of land is predicated on the dispossession of the other?” (3). Her answer is multifaceted and reveals the complexities of lives ...


Cricket And Base Ball In Kansas, 1860–1869, Mark E. Eberle Aug 2019

Cricket And Base Ball In Kansas, 1860–1869, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

During the 1860s, cricket clubs were organized before the first baseball clubs in Kansas. Following the US Civil War, baseball grew in popularity, and soldiers and immigrants from the Northeast and Midwest brought the sport with them to the state. This essay describes the first two cricket clubs in Kansas—the Leavenworth Occidental Cricket Club and the Wyandotte City Cricket Club—and the transition to baseball.


The Color Line In Kansas Baseball And The “Champion Stars” Of Fort Scott, 1874–1878, Mark E. Eberle Aug 2019

The Color Line In Kansas Baseball And The “Champion Stars” Of Fort Scott, 1874–1878, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

Fort Scott was represented by the second baseball team in Kansas to join the National Association of Base-Ball Players in 1866. The city was also the site of the state’s first known baseball games between segregated teams of black and white players. In 1874 and 1877, a black baseball team named the Star Base Ball Club claimed the informal city championship of Fort Scott. This essay describes the first games between black and white teams in Kansas, the early history of baseball in Fort Scott, and the history of the Star Base Ball Club during the 1870s.


Seventh Us Cavalry Base Ball In Kansas, 1868–1870, Mark E. Eberle Aug 2019

Seventh Us Cavalry Base Ball In Kansas, 1868–1870, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

From 1868 through 1870, the Seventh US Cavalry and other military units played baseball in Kansas at their various posts and in the field. Details of several games were reported in local newspapers, as well as the New York Clipper. The Seventh Cavalry clubs, most notably Captain Frederick Benteen’s Company H, continued to play through 1875 while stationed in the South and the Dakota Territory, before the regiment was decimated at the Battle of Little Bighorn (Greasy Grass) in 1876. This essay focuses on the Seventh Cavalry’s baseball experiences in Kansas. A list of known games played by ...


Deaf Baseball Players In Kansas And Kansas City, 1878–1911, Mark E. Eberle Aug 2019

Deaf Baseball Players In Kansas And Kansas City, 1878–1911, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

During the late 1800s and early 1900s, William Hoy and Luther Taylor were well-known baseball players in the major leagues. Hoy and Taylor were also deaf. Consequently, they were given the same inappropriate nickname—Dummy. Several other deaf ballplayers enjoyed careers in the major and minor leagues, as well as on other professional teams. This narrative focuses on the lesser-known aspects of the early history of deaf baseball players and teams, with an emphasis on Kansas. It opens with the experiences of students at the Kansas State School for the Deaf at the end of the nineteenth century, where Luther ...


“Compelled To Row: Blacks On Royal Navy Galleys During The American Revolution”, Charles R. Foy Aug 2019

“Compelled To Row: Blacks On Royal Navy Galleys During The American Revolution”, Charles R. Foy

Charles Foy

Work on Royal Navy galleys in North America during the American Revolution was physically demanding, lacked in sufficient shelter for their crews and rarely resulted in sailors obtaining prize monies. These conditions resulted in desertion rates five times greater than on other Royal Navy vessels and the frequent employment of older men. At the same time, Blacks served British galleys at twice the rate as on other Royal Navy vessels. This was due to the hiring out of slaves onto galleys by Loyalists, the impressment of free black seamen by galley commanders and fugitive slaves seeking freedom through service on ...


On The Margins, Rowan Cahill Aug 2019

On The Margins, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

An overview of the work of Australian activist/historian Iain McIntyre, and a review of his anthology On the Fly! Hobo Literature and Songs, 1879-1941 (PM Press, 2018)


History 105 History Of The United States From 1877 To The Present Syllabus Spring 2019, Aaron Walk Aug 2019

History 105 History Of The United States From 1877 To The Present Syllabus Spring 2019, Aaron Walk

Aaron Walk

This is a sample syllabus for History 105 submitted as part of the Global Studies Initiatives in Social Sciences Grant at Parkland College for the 2018-2019 academic year. Highlights indicate changes and additions made that incorporate global studies into the curriculum.


History 105 History Of The United States From 1877 To The Present Course Project Instructions Spring 2019, Aaron Walk Aug 2019

History 105 History Of The United States From 1877 To The Present Course Project Instructions Spring 2019, Aaron Walk

Aaron Walk

No abstract provided.


Usa, Sebastian Braun Aug 2019

Usa, Sebastian Braun

Sebastian Braun

Approximately 5.1 million people in the U.S., or 1.7% of the total population, identify as Native American or Alaska Native alone or in combination with another ethnic identity. Around 2.5 million, or 0.8% of the population, identify as American Indian or Alaska Native only.1 Five hundred and sixty-six tribal entities were federally-recognized at the beginning of 2015,2 and most of these have recognized national homelands. Twenty-three per cent of the Native population live in American Indian areas or Alaska Native villages. The state with the largest Native population is California; the place with ...


Ohio's Bicentennial: Exploring Nearby History, Ronald G. Helms Ph.D., Marjorie L. Mclellan Jul 2019

Ohio's Bicentennial: Exploring Nearby History, Ronald G. Helms Ph.D., Marjorie L. Mclellan

Ronald Helms

Clearly, the Ohio Bicentennial is an important event for celebration. This article seeks to promote the Ohio Bicentennial by reviewing a project devoted to the local or public aspect of history. The focus of the project was the study of the history of Dayton, Ohio. Wright State University developed the Nearby History Institute, which brought public historians, social studies professors and researchers from area archives and museums together with faculty from the public schools, to rethink and strengthen American history teaching in the Miami Valley. The Ohio Humanities Council and the Martha Holden Jennings Foundation funded the institute.


Toward A Black Baseball League For Kansas City, 1890–1916: Proposals And Challenges, Mark E. Eberle Jul 2019

Toward A Black Baseball League For Kansas City, 1890–1916: Proposals And Challenges, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

Studies of Negro Leagues baseball from 1920 through the 1950s address various aspects of the organization and operation of the leagues, and provide portraits of the teams, players, and other prominent individuals. However, there were earlier attempts by black teams to organize leagues during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Given the many proposed and short-lived black leagues prior to 1920, the focus of this monograph is the proposals that included clubs from Kansas City. None of the leagues proposed before the First World War survived beyond its inaugural season, but the number of proposals offered over three decades reflects ...


Who’S On First? Kansas City’S Female Baseball Stars, 1899–1929, Mark E. Eberle Jul 2019

Who’S On First? Kansas City’S Female Baseball Stars, 1899–1929, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

Although female players were typically excluded from formal baseball teams, teams consisting entirely or partly of female players were organized across the country as early as the mid-1800s. The first female baseball club in Kansas and adjacent states was organized in Wichita in 1873. These early teams predated the arrival of the barnstorming teams with female players and usually one or more male players, who were sometimes disguised as women. Female players on most of these early traveling teams wore bloomers, and the teams were referred to as “bloomer girls.” Women on later teams wore traditional baseball uniforms and objected ...


Evans’ All-Nations And Mayetta Indians Baseball, 1917, Mark E. Eberle Jul 2019

Evans’ All-Nations And Mayetta Indians Baseball, 1917, Mark E. Eberle

Mark E. Eberle

On 4 April 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and prepared to enter what would later be referred to as the First World War. Those preparations would last through the summer, as many young men spent one last season playing baseball before leaving for Europe. Among these teams in northeastern Kansas were two local teams not composed solely of white players. The Evans’ All-Nations was an integrated team in Horton composed of white, black, American Indian, and possibly Mexican players. Jesse Evans, a local black barber, managed the team. About 25 miles southwest of Horton, on the Prairie ...