Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Psycholinguistics and Neurolinguistics Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

289 Full-Text Articles 393 Authors 68,837 Downloads 61 Institutions

All Articles in Psycholinguistics and Neurolinguistics

Faceted Search

289 full-text articles. Page 1 of 12.

Timing Comparisons Across American Sign Language And English, Jillian Bartlett 2021 University of Southern Maine

Timing Comparisons Across American Sign Language And English, Jillian Bartlett

Thinking Matters Symposium

American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English differ in modalities, but prosody can be found in both. Previous studies show that the Closure Positive Shift (CPS) (an established component of an Event-Related Potential [ERP]) occurs in response to acoustic stimuli indicative of prosodic phrasing (Pannekamp et al., 2005; Steinhauer et al., 1999). Prosodic processing in relation to these two modalities was studied using EEG. Sixteen Deaf ASL speakers and 34 hearing English speakers participated in the study by watching video or listening to audio recordings of stimuli while a portable electroencephalogram, or EEG (a device that detects abnormalities in brain ...


There And Gone Again: Syntactic Structure In Memory, Caroline Andrews 2021 University of Massachusetts Amherst

There And Gone Again: Syntactic Structure In Memory, Caroline Andrews

Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation addresses the relationship between hierarchical syntactic structure and memory in language processing of individual sentences. Hierarchical syntactic structure is a key part of human languages and language processing but its integration with memory has been uneasy ever since Sachs (1967) demonstrated that the syntactic structure of individual sentences is lost in explicit sentence recall tasks much faster than other linguistic information (lexical, semantic, etc.). Nonetheless, psycholinguists have continued to draw on memory in syntactic processing theories, in part due to (i) the explanatory power that memory can give to sentence processing hypotheses, and (ii) the conflicting results that ...


Shifting The Perspectival Landscape: Methods For Encoding, Identifying, And Selecting Perspectives, Carolyn Jane Anderson 2021 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Shifting The Perspectival Landscape: Methods For Encoding, Identifying, And Selecting Perspectives, Carolyn Jane Anderson

Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation explores the semantics and pragmatics of perspectival expressions. Perspective, or point-of-view, encompasses an individual’s thoughts, perceptions, and location. Many expressions in natural language have components of their meanings that shift depending on whose perspective they are evaluated against. In this dissertation, I explore two sets of questions relating to perspective sensitivity. The first set of questions relate to how perspective is encoded in the semantics of perspectival expressions. The second set of questions relate to how conversation participants treat perspectival expressions: the speaker’s selection of a perspective and the listener’s identification of the speaker’s ...


A Minimalist Approach To Facilitatory Effects In Stacked Relative Clauses, Aniello De Santo 2021 University of Utah

A Minimalist Approach To Facilitatory Effects In Stacked Relative Clauses, Aniello De Santo

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

A top-down parser for Minimalist grammars (MGs; Stabler, 2013) can successfully predict a variety of off-line processing preferences, via metrics linking parsing behavior to memory load (Kobele et al., 2013; Gerth, 2015; Graf et al., 2017). The increasing empirical coverage of this model is intriguing, given its close association to modern minimalist syntax. Recently however, Zhang (2017) has argued that this framework is unable to account for a set of complexity profiles reported for English and Mandarin Chinese stacked relative clauses. Based on these observations, this paper proposes extensions to this model implementing a notion of memory reactivation, in the ...


Effects Of Duration, Locality, And Surprisal In Speech Disfluency Prediction In English Spontaneous Speech, Samvit Dammalapati, Rajakrishnan Rajkumar, Sumeet Agarwal 2021 Indian Institute of Technology Delhi

Effects Of Duration, Locality, And Surprisal In Speech Disfluency Prediction In English Spontaneous Speech, Samvit Dammalapati, Rajakrishnan Rajkumar, Sumeet Agarwal

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

This study examines the role of two influential theories of language processing, Surprisal Theory and Dependency Locality Theory (DLT), in predicting disfluencies (fillers and reparandums) in the Switchboard corpus of English conversational speech. Using Generalized Linear Mixed Models for this task, we incorporate syntactic factors (DLT-inspired costs and syntactic surprisal) in addition to lexical surprisal and duration, thus going beyond the local lexical frequency and predictability used in previous work on modelling word durations in Switchboard speech. Our results indicate that compared to fluent words, words preceding disfluencies tend to have lower lexical surprisal (hence higher activation levels) and lower ...


Every Ambiguity Isn’T Syntactic In Nature: Testing The Rational Speech Act Model Of Scope Ambiguity, Sherry Yong Chen, Bob van Tiel 2021 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Every Ambiguity Isn’T Syntactic In Nature: Testing The Rational Speech Act Model Of Scope Ambiguity, Sherry Yong Chen, Bob Van Tiel

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

Utterances like ‘Every guest didn’t leave’ are ambiguous between a reading according to which no guest left and a reading according to which not all of the guests left. This ambiguity is often explained by assuming that ‘every-not’ utterances have two different syntactic parses. However, experimental studies have shown that pragmatic factors, such as prior probabilities and the question under discussion, also play an important role in the interpretation of ambiguous ‘every-not’ utterances. Recently, Scontras and Pearl (2020) put forward a probabilistic model of ambiguity resolution that makes it possible to quantify the relative contribution of syntactic and pragmatic ...


Can Rnns Trained On Harder Subject-Verb Agreement Instances Still Perform Well On Easier Ones?, Hritik Bansal, Gantavya Bhatt, Sumeet Agarwal 2021 Indian Institute of Technology Delhi

Can Rnns Trained On Harder Subject-Verb Agreement Instances Still Perform Well On Easier Ones?, Hritik Bansal, Gantavya Bhatt, Sumeet Agarwal

Proceedings of the Society for Computation in Linguistics

The main subject and the associated verb in English must agree in grammatical number as per the Subject-Verb Agreement (SVA) phenomenon. It has been found that the presence of a noun between the verb and the main subject, whose grammatical number is opposite to that of the main subject, can cause speakers to produce a verb that agrees with the intervening noun rather than the main noun; the former thus acts as an agreement attractor. Such attractors have also been shown to pose a challenge for RNN models without explicit hierarchical bias to perform well on SVA tasks. Previous work ...


Spelling And Reading Novel Homophones: Testing The Value Of Lexical Distinctiveness, Jayde Homer 2021 Washington University in St. Louis

Spelling And Reading Novel Homophones: Testing The Value Of Lexical Distinctiveness, Jayde Homer

Arts & Sciences Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Lexical distinctiveness, according to which a written form represents one and only one morpheme, is a feature of some writing systems. For example, ‹bear› and ‹bare› are spelled differently in English. In two experiments, we asked whether readers and spellers of English benefit from distinctive spellings of homophones. In Experiment 1, university students listened to 40 passages, each containing a novel homophone (e.g., /kel/ used to mean a gossip-lover). In Experiment 2, participants read the passages. Half of the novel homophones were homographic (e.g., ‹kale›), and half were heterographic (e.g., ‹kail›). In both experiments, participants answered questions ...


The Inevitability Of Collision: Creating Empathy Through Fiction, Danielle Beckman 2021 Regis University

The Inevitability Of Collision: Creating Empathy Through Fiction, Danielle Beckman

Student Publications

While the stigma for mental illnesses has greatly declined in the last decade, there is still a disconnect between individuals without neurological illnesses and those with neurological illnesses, especially those that cause individuals to lose contact with reality. The goal of this interdisciplinary paper is to create empathy for these individuals, specifically people with schizophrenia, Alzheimer disease, and post-traumatic amnesia. Through a collection of four stories told from the perspective of these unreliable narrators, I used fiction writing techniques from the field of cognitive literary studies such as gapping and defamiliarization to create more empathy in the reader. In reading ...


Talking About Her(Self): Ambiguity Avoidance And Principle B. A Theoretical And Psycholinguistic Investigation Of Romanian Pronouns, Rudmila-Rodica Ivan 2020 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Talking About Her(Self): Ambiguity Avoidance And Principle B. A Theoretical And Psycholinguistic Investigation Of Romanian Pronouns, Rudmila-Rodica Ivan

Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation answers a deceivingly simple question: why can her in Hermione talked about her refer to the sentence subject in Romanian, but not in English? The Romanian facts, which are surprising for both classic and competition-based accounts of the Binding Theory over the last 40 odd years, bring us to the following overarching question: what are the constraints on pronominal reference? To address these main questions, I carry out a psycholinguistic investigation of Romanian pronouns and argue that the distribution and interpretation of pronominal forms is jointly determined by pragmatic and morphosyntactic constraints.

I discuss evidence from four experiments ...


Person-Based Prominence In Ojibwe, Christopher Hammerly 2020 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Person-Based Prominence In Ojibwe, Christopher Hammerly

Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation develops a formal and psycholinguistic theory of person-based prominence effects, the finding that certain categories of person such as "first" and "second" (the "local" persons) are privileged by the grammar. The thesis takes on three questions: (i) What are the possible categories related to person? (ii) What are the possible prominence relationships between these categories? And (iii) how is prominence information used to parse and interpret linguistic input in real time?

The empirical through-line is understanding obviation — a “spotlighting” system, found most prominently in the Algonquian family of languages, that splits the (ani- mate) third persons into two ...


Representing Context: Presupposition Triggers And Focus-Sensitivity, Alexander Goebel 2020 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Representing Context: Presupposition Triggers And Focus-Sensitivity, Alexander Goebel

Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation investigates the role of Focus-sensitivity for a typology of presupposition triggers. The central hypothesis is that Focus-sensitive triggers require a linguistic antecedent in the discourse model, whereas presuppositions of triggers lacking Focus-sensitivity are satisfied as entailments of the Common Ground. This hypothesis is supported by experimental evidence from two borne out predictions. First, Focus-sensitive triggers are sensitive to the salience of the antecedent satisfying their presupposition, as operationalized via the Question Under Discussion, and lead to interference-type effects, while triggers lacking Focus-sensitivity are indifferent to the QUD-structure. Second, Focus-sensitive triggers are harder to globally accommodate than triggers lacking ...


Working Memory Training: Cognitive And Linguistic Implications In Adult English Language Learners, Deepti Wadhera 2020 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Working Memory Training: Cognitive And Linguistic Implications In Adult English Language Learners, Deepti Wadhera

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This study used a cognitive training paradigm to explore whether the same mechanisms of working memory underly conflict resolution in non-verbal and verbal domains in adult English language learners.The association between an individual’s Working Memory (WM) performance and their success in skills such as interference control, decision-making and language processing has been repeatedly highlighted by researchers in cognitive psychology and linguistic fields. Particularly, acquisition and use of a second language is one life experience in which WM ability seems valuable. However, when this association is put to the test in studies that train participants’ WM and measure transfer ...


Bilingual Reading Fluency And Prediction: Heritage Language Versus Second Language, Olga Parshina 2020 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Bilingual Reading Fluency And Prediction: Heritage Language Versus Second Language, Olga Parshina

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

The thesis presents the first comparative investigation of reading fluency and factors that affect it by examining eye movements in reading by Heritage Speakers (HSs) and L2 learners of Russian. The eye movements of bilingual participants are compared to two control groups, monolingual adults and monolingual children. Following the introductory Chapter 1, in Chapter 2 we present the study that establishes basic eye-movement characteristics in reading for Heritage Speakers and L2 learners in connection to proficiency and linguistics factors of word length and frequency. Contrary to our predictions, we found that all eye-movement characteristics of high-proficiency HSs are different from ...


Processing Coercion In A First, Non-Dominant Language: Mandarin-English Heritage Bilinguals, Christina N. Dadurian 2020 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Processing Coercion In A First, Non-Dominant Language: Mandarin-English Heritage Bilinguals, Christina N. Dadurian

Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Recent work in heritage language grammars has shown variability in L1 competence, despite high proficiency in both languages. While sources of variation have been debated, little attention has been given to the role of language dominance. This thesis uses a self-paced listening task to explicitly investigate the roles of language dominance and pragmatic competence in how heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese process aspectual coercion in their non-dominant home language, as compared to late bilinguals. Specifically, constructions that vary in acceptability and salience in input between Mandarin and English are tested: Iterative coercion, complement event coercion of entity NPs, and perfective ...


The Acquisition Of Np-Trace In English, Michiko Terada 2020 University of Massachusetts at Amherst

The Acquisition Of Np-Trace In English, Michiko Terada

University of Massachusetts Occasional Papers in Linguistics

No abstract provided.


The Acquisition Of Passive With Instrumental Prepositional Phrases In English, Xiaoping Teng 2020 University of Massachusetts

The Acquisition Of Passive With Instrumental Prepositional Phrases In English, Xiaoping Teng

University of Massachusetts Occasional Papers in Linguistics

No abstract provided.


Deterministic Parsing And The Verb Raising Construction In German And Dutch, Hotze Rullmann 2020 University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Deterministic Parsing And The Verb Raising Construction In German And Dutch, Hotze Rullmann

University of Massachusetts Occasional Papers in Linguistics

No abstract provided.


The Parsing Of Anaphor Binding & Levels Of Representation, Bernadette Plunkett 2020 UMass

The Parsing Of Anaphor Binding & Levels Of Representation, Bernadette Plunkett

University of Massachusetts Occasional Papers in Linguistics

No abstract provided.


The Early Interpretation Of Expletive Pronouns, Ana Teresa Perez-Leroux, Sabina Aurilio 2020 UMASS, Amherst

The Early Interpretation Of Expletive Pronouns, Ana Teresa Perez-Leroux, Sabina Aurilio

University of Massachusetts Occasional Papers in Linguistics

No abstract provided.


Digital Commons powered by bepress