Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History of Gender Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1,127 Full-Text Articles 775 Authors 872,086 Downloads 158 Institutions

All Articles in History of Gender

Faceted Search

1,127 full-text articles. Page 2 of 36.

“‘The Negro Had Been Run Over Long Enough By White Men, And It Was Time They Defend Themselves’: African-American Mutinies And The Long Emancipation, 1861-1974”, Scott F. Thompson 2021 West Virginia University

“‘The Negro Had Been Run Over Long Enough By White Men, And It Was Time They Defend Themselves’: African-American Mutinies And The Long Emancipation, 1861-1974”, Scott F. Thompson

Graduate Theses, Dissertations, and Problem Reports

This dissertation analyzes racially motivated mutinies by black military servicemen from the Civil War to the Vietnam War. Resistance against white supremacy in the armed forces illustrates the commitment of generations of African Americans to a vision of freedom centered on bodily, familial, and socioeconomic autonomy. These mutinies thereby warrant the reframing of emancipation as a centuries’-long process rather than a single event confined to the 1860s. Subscribing to martial masculinity, black servicemen believed acting forcefully, and risking their lives or well-being as a result, offered the best path to earning their human rights. African-American sailors enjoyed the opportunities ...


Women And World War One: Perspectives On Women's Role In Wwi Literature, Rachel Michelle Brown 2021 Central Washington University

Women And World War One: Perspectives On Women's Role In Wwi Literature, Rachel Michelle Brown

All Master's Theses

This thesis analyzes the changing gender roles of British women who served as caretakers in World War One. Often overlooked for their contributions, the women who worked on the frontlines of the war defined the changing role of women during and after the war in several crucial ways: 1) the general expectations of women’s gender role, 2) how women perceived and acted in motherhood, and 3) how women constructed and maintained heterosexual, homosocial, and platonic relationships. Using a gender theory approach, this thesis analyzes two semi-autobiographical fictional texts, Evadne Price’s Not So Quiet: Stepdaughters of War, published in ...


Unspoken Whiteness: #Whitexicans And Religious Conservativism In Mexico., Ricardo J. Alvarez-Pimentel 2020 Yale University

Unspoken Whiteness: #Whitexicans And Religious Conservativism In Mexico., Ricardo J. Alvarez-Pimentel

Journal of Hispanic and Lusophone Whiteness Studies (HLWS)

This article explores intersections between religious conservatism, pro-Americanism, and whiteness in Mexican society. Specifically, it examines past and present attempts by white elites and religious conservatives to surveille indigenous women’s bodies and sexuality, to “Americanize” Mexico, and to glorify the nation’s European legacies at the expense of erasing—and even justifying— anti-indigenous violence. This paper analyzes conservative activism as carried out by early-twentiethcentury Catholic activists and contemporary social media users grappling with the present-day “whitexican” phenomenon. It analyzes Mexicans’ unspoken appeals to whiteness as they permeate prevalent discourses of feminine propriety and religious restoration, North American cultural proximity ...


Institutionalizing Gender: Madness, The Family, And Psychiatric Power In Nineteenth-Century France, Jessie Hewitt 2020 University of Redlands

Institutionalizing Gender: Madness, The Family, And Psychiatric Power In Nineteenth-Century France, Jessie Hewitt

Our House Books

Institutionalizing Gender analyzes the relationship between class, gender, and psychiatry in France from 1789 to 1900, an era noteworthy for the creation of the psychiatric profession, the development of a national asylum system, and the spread of bourgeois gender values.

Asylum doctors in nineteenth-century France promoted the notion that manliness was synonymous with rationality, using this "fact" to pathologize non-normative behaviors and confine people who did not embody mainstream gender expectations to asylums. And yet, this gendering of rationality also had the power to upset prevailing dynamics between men and women. Jessie Hewitt argues that the ways that doctors used ...


Patriarchy And Gender Law In Ancient Rome And Colonial America, John B. Kamp 2020 University of Iowa

Patriarchy And Gender Law In Ancient Rome And Colonial America, John B. Kamp

Iowa Historical Review

Roman Antiquity and Colonial America shared much in common regarding limits on women’s legal rights and the role of gender in law. Gendered stereotypes regarding women’s ability and place in society are reflected in the patria potestas and manus of Ancient Roman law, as well as through the patriarchal and pious Puritan laws of New England society during the American Colonial period. Both male-dominated social and legal systems were based on the notion of women’s innate inferiority and female submission to male authority. Gender expectations and biases are also present, not only in family law, but also ...


"A Friend, A Nimble Mind, And A Book": Girls' Literary Criticism In Seventeen Magazine, 1958-1969, Jill E. Anderson 2020 Georgia State University

"A Friend, A Nimble Mind, And A Book": Girls' Literary Criticism In Seventeen Magazine, 1958-1969, Jill E. Anderson

University Library Faculty Publications

This article argues that postwar Seventeen magazine, a publication deeply invested in enforcing heteronormativity and conventional models of girlhood and womanhood, was in fact a more complex and multivocal serial text whose editors actively sought out, cultivated, and published girls’ creative and intellectual work. Seventeen's teen-authored “Curl Up and Read” book review columns, published from 1958 through 1969, are examples of girls’ creative intellectual labor, introducing Seventeen's readers to fiction and nonfiction which ranged beyond the emerging “young-adult” literature of the period. Written by young people – including thirteen-year-old Eve Kosofsky (later Sedgwick) – who perceived Seventeen to be an ...


The Evolution Of Defining Rape In The United States, Sophia Rhoades 2020 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

The Evolution Of Defining Rape In The United States, Sophia Rhoades

Chancellor’s Honors Program Projects

No abstract provided.


From The Womb To The Word: Pregnancy And Pregnancy Metaphors In 16th And 17th Century English Literature, Kelly S. Westeen 2020 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

From The Womb To The Word: Pregnancy And Pregnancy Metaphors In 16th And 17th Century English Literature, Kelly S. Westeen

Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation employs a feminist theoretical lens in exploring the gendered uses of pregnancy and pregnancy metaphors in the production and dissemination of literary works in early modern England. By also examining the history of the printing press and the role it played in gendered textual production, early modern constructs of family and the role of mothers, as well as obstetric medicine and childbirth, I aim to demonstrate that mothering and authorship were congruent activities for female writers. Conversely, I argue that male writers of the period who employed metaphors of gestation did so not to try to claim biological ...


Acknowledging Our Past: Race, Landscape And History, Alea Harris, Kaycia Best, Dieran McGowan, Destiny Shippy, Vera Oberg, Bryson Coleman, Rhiannon Leebrick Ph.D. 2020 Wofford College

Acknowledging Our Past: Race, Landscape And History, Alea Harris, Kaycia Best, Dieran Mcgowan, Destiny Shippy, Vera Oberg, Bryson Coleman, Rhiannon Leebrick Ph.D.

Student Scholarship

This book is the product of nearly a year's worth of student research on Wofford College's history, undertaken as part of a grant by the Council of Independent Colleges in the Humanities Research for the Public Good initiative. The research was supervised and directed by Dr. Rhiannon Leebrick.

"Guiding Research Questions:

How did Wofford College and its early stakeholders support and participate in slavery?

How is the legacy of slavery present in the landscape of our campus (buildings, statues, names, etc.)?

How can we better understand Wofford as an institution during the time of Reconstruction through the Jim ...


Women’S Suffrage Is “Nothing Less Than Treasonable:” An Analysis Of Rural Women And Their Group Activism In The Women’S Suffrage Movement In The Jackson Purchase Area, 1838-1940, Ashleigh Deno 2020 Murray State University

Women’S Suffrage Is “Nothing Less Than Treasonable:” An Analysis Of Rural Women And Their Group Activism In The Women’S Suffrage Movement In The Jackson Purchase Area, 1838-1940, Ashleigh Deno

Honors College Theses

The 1910s was a decade characterized by technological advancement, World War I, and a global movement for women’s suffrage, which would eventually culminate with legislation, most notably the 19th Amendment in the United States. In the United States, women staged protests throughout the country and were known to stand outside of the White House with taunting signs for President Woodrow Wilson to read. This movement came to the United States from other parts of the globe, particularly Britain, and suffragists from other countries were known to travel to the States to give presentations and provide guidance to suffragists on ...


The Inequalities Women Face In Stem: From Their Education To The Workplace, Sophie Rhodes 2020 Augustana College, Rock Island Illinois

The Inequalities Women Face In Stem: From Their Education To The Workplace, Sophie Rhodes

Women's and Gender Studies: Student Scholarship & Creative Works

No abstract provided.


Homosexuality During The Transition From Weimar Republic To Third Reich, Abigail Minzer 2020 Gettysburg College

Homosexuality During The Transition From Weimar Republic To Third Reich, Abigail Minzer

Student Publications

Homosexual communities successfully formed prominent subcultures during the Weimar Republic for a multitude of reasons: scientific research and educational outreach to the public about the inborn nature of homosexuality, less strict media censorship laws, and a vague anti-sodomy law that was difficult to enforce led police to often prefer tolerance over prosecution. The Third Reich brought about a deep cultural shift that would prove incredibly harmful to the homosexual communities. While at first, homosexuals had not been a targeted group largely thanks to Hitler’s personal friendship with a gay Nazi named Ernst Röhm, the latter’s sexuality became the ...


Review Of Nancy F. Cott, The Bonds Of Womanhood: Woman’S Sphere In New England, 1780-1835, Merritt A. Morgan 2020 Liberty University

Review Of Nancy F. Cott, The Bonds Of Womanhood: Woman’S Sphere In New England, 1780-1835, Merritt A. Morgan

Bound Away: The Liberty Journal of History

Historian Nancy Cott has produced an important work that explores the dialectic between the women’s work and their changing status in reference to the new rhetoric of democracy in the antebellum period. Cott shows us how women perceived themselves and what they said that she expects will lead to a new framework for the interpretation of the concept of womanhood.


“The New American Woman”: The Legal And Political Career Of Clara Shortridge Foltz, Marissa Swope 2020 Liberty University

“The New American Woman”: The Legal And Political Career Of Clara Shortridge Foltz, Marissa Swope

Bound Away: The Liberty Journal of History

This article analyzes the life and career of Clara Shortridge Foltz, a California attorney and suffragist of the latter decades of the 19th Century and the early 20th Century who was an early developer of the concept of the public defender, leaving an important legacy in the advancement of women's rights.


Posters, Handkerchiefs And Murals: Visual Gender Separation During The Troubles, Bradley Rohlf 2020 Mount Aloysius College

Posters, Handkerchiefs And Murals: Visual Gender Separation During The Troubles, Bradley Rohlf

Irish Communication Review

The Troubles in Northern Ireland provide a complex and intriguing topic for many scholars in various academic disciplines. Their violence, publicity and tragedy are common themes that elicit a plethora of emotional responses throughout the world. However, the very intimate nature of this conflict creates a much more complex system of friends, foes and experiences for those involved. While the very heart of the Irish nationalist movement is founded on liberal and progressive concepts such as socialism and equality, the media associated with it sometimes promote tradition and conservatism, especially regarding gender. This critical study examines a sociopolitical struggle through ...


Treating The Revolution: Health Care And Solidarity In El Salvador And Nicaragua In The 1980s, Brittany McWilliams 2020 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Treating The Revolution: Health Care And Solidarity In El Salvador And Nicaragua In The 1980s, Brittany Mcwilliams

Masters Theses

Health care played an important role in the revolutions of El Salvador and Nicaragua. Both the Sandinistas and the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN) prioritized popular health throughout the 1980s. Clinics and hospitals served as sites of revolution that drew healthcare solidarity activists from the United States. These health internationalists worked to build community-level networks that relied upon trained medical volunteers. In both El Salvador and Nicaragua, women comprised a bulk of the community health workers. These women chose to interact with revolution by building on radical promises of universal healthcare access. Healthcare solidarity activists trained community volunteers and ...


Too Much And Too Graphic: Dr. Ruth Westheimer And The Struggle For 1980s And 1990s Feminism, Louisa Marshall 2020 Chapman University

Too Much And Too Graphic: Dr. Ruth Westheimer And The Struggle For 1980s And 1990s Feminism, Louisa Marshall

Voces Novae

During the second wave of feminism, spanning from the mid 1960s to the mid 1970s, the United States saw unprecedented levels of change regarding the status of women. However, the conservative administrations of Reagan and H.W. Bush that followed turned the tides against the feminist movement and towards re-establishing traditional gender roles. Trail blazing women, including sex therapist Dr. Ruth Westheimer, dedicated their 20th century careers to combating traditional sentiment, thus changing gender roles forever.


Educated To Death? Women’S Higher Education, Reproductive Health, And The Scientific Method In The United States, 1870-1900, Eleanor Naiman 2020 Swarthmore College

Educated To Death? Women’S Higher Education, Reproductive Health, And The Scientific Method In The United States, 1870-1900, Eleanor Naiman

Swarthmore Undergraduate History Journal

From 1870-1890, American gynecologists positioned themselves at the center of debates about women’s education. Gynecologists manipulated social anxiety about shifting demographics and falling birthrates among white middle class women in order to legitimate their emerging discipline. In doing so, they couched American understandings of infertility in a politics of blame and demonized women for their inability to reproduce. Although doctors’ conversations about “sterility” primarily took place within the pages of journals published by all-male medical associations, many women engaged in this debate and challenged medical authority in the pages of popular magazines and newspapers. Female doctors, teachers, scholars, women ...


Full Issue: Volume 1, Issue 1, Editorial Board 2020 Swarthmore College

Full Issue: Volume 1, Issue 1, Editorial Board

Swarthmore Undergraduate History Journal

The first issue of the Swarthmore Undergraduate History Journal.


Witches, Wolves, And Wilderness: Notions Of Purity And Righteous Domination In Early America, Neil Burton 2020 Western Connecticut State University

Witches, Wolves, And Wilderness: Notions Of Purity And Righteous Domination In Early America, Neil Burton

History Theses

An examination of the ideological, theological, and archetypal forces behind early New England colonists' conception of America as the potential for a “New Canaan”, an idealized and restocked version of the overburdened, at-capacity, denuded agrarian Europe they left behind but which continued to shape their perceptions of their ongoing experience. In particular, their conception of an omnipotent, judgmental, white, male anthropomorphized God would guide their notions of their own sense of entitlement and supremacy in these new lands inhabited by non-white people and wild non humans. This vision would affect nearly all early American practices and attitudes relating to ‘New ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress