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Archaeological Anthropology Commons

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Comparing Museum Collections With Archaeological Collections: An Example Using A Class Of Ceramic Items, Lynne Sussman 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Comparing Museum Collections With Archaeological Collections: An Example Using A Class Of Ceramic Items, Lynne Sussman

Northeast Historical Archaeology

An analysis of decorations and shapes in undertaken to examine the development of industrial slipwares. These materials are then compared with creamwares, pearlwares, and whitewares. The samples are drawn from archaeological, museum, and private collections. The author then offers a consideration of the nature of the differences between the archaeological and the museum collections.


The Structural Evolution Of Fort Frontenac, W. Bruce Stewart 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

The Structural Evolution Of Fort Frontenac, W. Bruce Stewart

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Fort Frontenac, located at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, in Kingston, Ontario, is among the earliest European sites in the Great Lakes Basin. The post was established in 1673 by Count Frontenac, then Governor of New France, as a means of intercepting furs destined for the Dutch and, later, the English merchants at Albany, New York. As the result of ongoing archaeological and historical research, a comprehensive structural history of the post has been developed. As the archaeological investigations have been restricted to the northwest bastion of the fort, that area will serve as the focus of the present ...


French Occupation Of The Lakes Ontario And Erie Drainage Basins 1650-1760, Donald A. Brown 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

French Occupation Of The Lakes Ontario And Erie Drainage Basins 1650-1760, Donald A. Brown

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Maps dating to the 17th and 18th centuries and written accounts are used to identify a number of contemporary posts en route from Montreal to Detroit/Pontchartrain which otherwise receive little or no mention in the historical record. Archaeological evidence from the undocumented mid-18th-century Floating Bridge site, near Kingston, Ontario, is interpreted as a possible trader's post/Metis habitation occupied following the destruction of Fort Frontenac and prior to the post-1763 British occupation of the area. Evidence is presented for its use by civilians, who selected the site primarily for its environment rather than as a point of intersection ...


Acadian Maine In Archaeological Perspective, Alaric Faulkner, Gretchen Faulkner 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Acadian Maine In Archaeological Perspective, Alaric Faulkner, Gretchen Faulkner

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Recent excavations at Fort Pentagoet and Saint-Castin's Habitation have shown physical evidence of three separate 17th-century Acadian occupations near the mouth of the Penobscot River in mid-coastal Maine. From 1635 to 1654, Fort Pentagoet defended private commercial interests of Charles d'Aulnay against English enemies and French rivals. From 1670 until its destruction by the Dutch in 1674, the fort served as military headquarters for the administration of all Acadia under governors Grandfontaine and Chambly. During the last quarter of the century, French authority was reestablished with a nearby Indian village at the habitation of Jean Vincent de Saint-Castin ...


A Bibliography Of Northeast Historical Archaeology, David R. Starbuck 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

A Bibliography Of Northeast Historical Archaeology, David R. Starbuck

Northeast Historical Archaeology

A bibliography including books and articles that relate to historical archaeology in the northeastern states and provinces and all articles published in Northeast Historical Archaeology since its creation.


The Council For Northeast Historical Archaeology: The Early Years, Budd Wilson 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

The Council For Northeast Historical Archaeology: The Early Years, Budd Wilson

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Budd Wilson, one of the founders of CNEHA, served on its Executive Board from 1966-1986. What follows are Budd's personal reminiscences of the development of CNEHA over its first 20 years.---Ed.


The Beginnings Of Modern Historical Archaeology In The Northeast And The Origins Of The Conference On Northeast Historical Archaeology, Paul R. Huey 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

The Beginnings Of Modern Historical Archaeology In The Northeast And The Origins Of The Conference On Northeast Historical Archaeology, Paul R. Huey

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Historical archaeology entered a remarkable period of growth and development following World War II and continuing through the 1950s and the first half of the 1960s. In addition to the pressing need for salvage archaeology at threatened sites, excavation occurred at many other sites for research purposes including reconstruction of historic buildings. New techniques of underwater exploration increased accessibility of shipwreck sites in the 1950s, and attention also focused increasingly on the problem of developing artifact typologies. Early in the 1960s statistical analysis and comparative study of archaeological data set a new direction, while an increasing number of excavations also ...


Introduction, E. Ann Smith 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Introduction, E. Ann Smith

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Introduction to the 20th anniversary volume of Northeast Historical Archaeology.


Origins Of Josiah Wedgwood's "Pearlware", George L. Miller 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Origins Of Josiah Wedgwood's "Pearlware", George L. Miller

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Close inspection of the documentary record reveals that Josiah Wedgwood's "pearlware" was no more than his own version of a ware already being produced as early as 1775 by other Staffordshire potters. Wedgwood introduced a new name, Pearl White, to distinguish his product from that of his competitors, which they called China Glaze. This is an important revision to ceramic chronology because "pearlware" has been considered by most historical archaeologists as a firm 1779 terminus post quem for archaeological deposits. This new knowledge will force a reconsideration of many of the contexts in which so-called pearlware has been found.


Analysis Of Faunal Remains From Queen Anne Square, Newport, Rhode Island, Timothy S. Young 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Analysis Of Faunal Remains From Queen Anne Square, Newport, Rhode Island, Timothy S. Young

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Queen Anne Square, Newport, Rhode Island, is a northeastern coastal site. This report presents the results of the analysis of faunal remains from three features representing different 18th-century households. The data show a heavy dependence on domestic animals. All three features contain over 90% domestic animals by biomass. The site closely resembles southeastern sites in percentages of cow and pig MNI. It also resembles other northeastern sites, however, in its high percentage of caprine MNI. This is probably indicative of an intermediate dietary pattern. There are also differences among the features; these can be attributed either to the economic status ...


An Admirable Police Maintained: Evidence Of Sanitary Practices At The New Windsor Cantonment, Edward J. Lenik 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

An Admirable Police Maintained: Evidence Of Sanitary Practices At The New Windsor Cantonment, Edward J. Lenik

Northeast Historical Archaeology

An archaeological survey at the 1782-83 winter encampent of the Continental Army at New Windsor, New York, has revealed the presence of several large pits or depressions located some 250ft (76.2m) from the site of the soldiers' huts. Test excavations and chemcial analysis of the soils have determined that these pits were utilized as latrines or necessaries. The land use pattern at the site, including the location of the soldiers' huts and the delineation of use areas for trash disposal and necessaries, reflects the officers' successful attempt to impose order and discipline on the troops.


Landfill And Health, A Municipal Concern Or, Telling It Like It Was, Joan H. Geismar 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Landfill And Health, A Municipal Concern Or, Telling It Like It Was, Joan H. Geismar

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Land reclamation in port cities is a worldwide phenomenon that clearly represents economic considerations and, often, intensifying urbanization. Analysis of the fill matrix of two New York City sites suggests that the imposition of municipal controls may be one facet of the urbanizing process documented in the archaeological record. Differences between the fill from the 175 Water Street site, an East River block filled in the 18th century, and Site 1 of the Washington Street Urban Renewal Area adjacent to the Hudson River, an early 19th-century fill site, are best explained by the introduction of city ordinances to regulate land ...


The Use Of Opal Phytolith Analysis In A Comprehensive Environmental Study: An Example From 19th-Century Lowell, Massachusetts, William F. Fisher, Gerald K. Kelso 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

The Use Of Opal Phytolith Analysis In A Comprehensive Environmental Study: An Example From 19th-Century Lowell, Massachusetts, William F. Fisher, Gerald K. Kelso

Northeast Historical Archaeology

The value of opal phytolith analysis is demonstrated in a comprehensive environmental study of a historical site, the Kirk Street Agents' House, Lowell, Massachusett. A method to measure phytolith degradation percentages is tested and shown to yield similar results to pollen corrosion indices; further research on this new method is suggested, however. Fluctuations in two classes of grass phytoliths indicate changing environmental conditions that support and expand upon changes noted in the pollen spectra. The results of the phytolith analysis are integrated with information derived from documentary research, artifactual analysis, stratigraphic interpretation, and other ethnobotanical methods to arrive at conclusions ...


Archaeologically Defining The Earlier Garden Landscapes At Morven: Preliminary Results, Anne E. Yentsch, Naomi F. Miller, Barbara Paca, Dolores Piperno 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Archaeologically Defining The Earlier Garden Landscapes At Morven: Preliminary Results, Anne E. Yentsch, Naomi F. Miller, Barbara Paca, Dolores Piperno

Northeast Historical Archaeology

The first phase of archaeology at Morven was designed to test the potential for further study of the early garden landscape at a ca. 1758 house in Princeton, New Jersey. The research included intensive botanical analysis using a variety of archaeobotanical framework. A study was also made of the garden's topography using map analysis combined with subsurface testing. Information on garden features related to the design of earlier garden surfaces suggests the ways in which the Stockton family manipulated their estate to convey a social image of the family to the local Princeton community. This, in turn, provides information ...


The Potential Applications Of Tooth Cement Increment Analysis In Historical Archaeology, David B. Landon 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

The Potential Applications Of Tooth Cement Increment Analysis In Historical Archaeology, David B. Landon

Northeast Historical Archaeology

The study of incremental structures in animal teeth is an analytical technique that is receiving increased attention from zooarchaeologists working in many parts of the world. The seasonal and annual cycles in the formation of tooth increments makes them ideal for determining the age of an animal when it was killed and the season of its death. This type of information can contribute significantly to interpretations of past animal husbandry practices. A sample of eight domestic animal teeth from the Wilkinson Backlot Site in dowtown Boston, Massachusetts, were studied in this fashion. Microscopic examination of the increment pattern of the ...


Skeletons In The Walls Of Old Québec, Jerome S. Cybulski 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Skeletons In The Walls Of Old Québec, Jerome S. Cybulski

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Fifty human skeletons were discovered during a Canadian Parks Service project to repair the mid-18th-century fortification wall of Québec City. Laboratory analysis revealed 45 males, three or four females, and one child, a sex and age ratio virtually identical to that gleaned from diaries reporting the 1746-1747 deaths of Protestant Prisoners of war. Skulls and teeth showed a prevalence of Caucasoid traits. Long bones indicated statures taller than those documented for European-born contemporaries and more closely resembling those known for North American colonials. Dental health was poor throughout the series. Most men had lesions suggesting heavy loading stresses on the ...


Ceramics And The Sea Trade In Portsmouth, New Hampshire: 1765-1785, Aileen Button Agnew 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Ceramics And The Sea Trade In Portsmouth, New Hampshire: 1765-1785, Aileen Button Agnew

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Portsmouth, New Hampshire, is a small seaport with a long history of maritime trade. The Deer Street archaeological projects in Portsmouth have provided extensive information on different stages of the city's past. The excavation of a small cellar, filled ca. 1785, yielded a wealth of artifacts dating to the period 1765-1785. More than 5000 ceramic artifacts were recovered, providing the basis for an examination of the connection between the sea trade and the personal possessions of the inhabitants.


The American Headquarters For The Battle Of Saratoga, David R. Starbuck 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

The American Headquarters For The Battle Of Saratoga, David R. Starbuck

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Two years of excavation have been conducted at the site of the American Headquarters for the Battle of Saratoga. Performed under the terms of a cooperative agreement between the National Park Service and Rensselar Polytechnic Institute, this survey effort has successfully located the foundation of the Ephraim Woodworth farmhouse, what appears to have been the Woodworth barn, a well that was behind the farmhouse, and a lengthy French drain that curved around the buildings on three sides. These features appear to be the only physical remains that have survived from the headquarters complex of General Horatio Gates, who occupied these ...


Anthrosols And The Analysis Of Archaeological Sites In A Plowed Context: The King's Reach Site, Dennis J. Pogue 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Anthrosols And The Analysis Of Archaeological Sites In A Plowed Context: The King's Reach Site, Dennis J. Pogue

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Archaeologists working in the Chesapeake region have been particularly active in using plowzone-derived artifacts for interpreting historic-period sites. More recently, the analysis of patterns in certain plowzone soil chemicals has developed as a significant complementary source of data, and over the last decade several sites, have been subjected to that type of study. An analysis of the distribution of soil chemicals at the King's Reach site (ca. 1690-1715) is presented as a case study in the use of the method. The pertinent literature on the subject is reviewed, and the King's Reach data are compared with those from ...


Book Review: The Edge Of The Woods: Iroquoia, 1534-1701, By Jon Parmenter, Jack Rossen 2014 SUNY Buffalo State

Book Review: The Edge Of The Woods: Iroquoia, 1534-1701, By Jon Parmenter, Jack Rossen

Northeast Historical Archaeology

Review of The Edge of the Woods: Iroquoia, 1634-1701, by Jon Parmenter, 2012, Michigan State University Press, 520 pages, black and white illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index, $49.95 (cloth).


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