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Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant McCall 2016 Tulane University of Louisiana

Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant Mccall

Karl Widerquist


Why do political philosophers write so much about prehistory but do such little research on it? The state of nature, the origin of property, the genesis of government, and the primordial nature of war and inequality are perennial favourite topics in political philosophy, but their use is often ambiguous. Are these merely illustrative examples? If so, what do they illustrate? If not, what claims to they make about prehistory. Does the best available evidence from the fields of archaeology and anthropology support or conflict with those claims?
 
This book presents an anthropological critique of philosophy, examining political theories to show ...


Appendix To Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant McCall 2016 Tulane University of Louisiana

Appendix To Prehistoric Myths In Modern Political Philosophy, Karl Widerquist, Grant Mccall

Karl Widerquist


This is an early version of the appendix to the book: Prehistoric Myths in Modern Political Philosophy.
 
Book abstract: Why do political philosophers write so much about prehistory but do such little research on it? The state of nature, the origin of property, the genesis of government, and the primordial nature of war and inequality are perennial favourite topics in political philosophy, but their use is often ambiguous. Are these merely illustrative examples? If so, what do they illustrate? If not, what claims to they make about prehistory. Does the best available evidence from the fields of archaeology and anthropology ...


Performing El Rap El ʿArabi 2005-2015: Feeling Politics Amid Neoliberal Incursions In Ramallah, Amman, And Beirut, Rayya S. El Zein 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Performing El Rap El ʿArabi 2005-2015: Feeling Politics Amid Neoliberal Incursions In Ramallah, Amman, And Beirut, Rayya S. El Zein

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This study is about politics in Arabic rap. Specifically, it is about affective dynamics and material negotiations during rap concerts in three cities in the Levant. I analyze Arab hip hop culture in the context of three different but related histories of cosmopolitan, middle class growth, and gentrification. Using an ethnomusicological framework rooted in participant observation and performance theory, I compare concert conditions, audience behavior, and accessibility of music production in Ramallah, Amman, and Beirut.

In Chapter One, I elaborate the discursive and theoretical frameworks that have pinned the political valences of Arab youth, Arab artists, and Arab rappers in ...


Understanding How Intentionally Unplugging From Cell Phones Shapes Interpersonal Relationships And The Undergraduate College Experience, Jadelin P. Felipe 2016 University of San Francisco

Understanding How Intentionally Unplugging From Cell Phones Shapes Interpersonal Relationships And The Undergraduate College Experience, Jadelin P. Felipe

Master's Theses

The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of what motivated college students—the Unplugged Students—to intentionally use their cell phones less and how they understood the impact that unplugging had on their interpersonal relationships and college experience. Nine undergraduate college students from four private schools were interviewed in one-on-one semi- structured interviews. These students, considered non-users, provided a particularly useful perspective as these students made a conscious choice to counteract social norms and experienced both being plugged in and unplugged. Cell phones and the act of unplugging proved to make up a complex and more nuanced ...


Gendered Use Of Adjectives In Fairy Tales: A Diachronic Study, Tara Cress 2016 Western University

Gendered Use Of Adjectives In Fairy Tales: A Diachronic Study, Tara Cress

Western Papers in Linguistics / Cahiers linguistiques de Western

This study focuses on gender represented in the literary context of fairy tales. It explores the adjectives used to describe the female and male gender diachronically and cross-sectionally over the span of the 19th century. By analyzing English translations of the Grimm Brothers’ “Ashputtel” (“Cinderella”), and “Hans In Luck,” I make observations about variations of adjective use within each text while comparatively looking at a female-centric narrative to a male-centric one. This provides a look into the relatively understudied subject of adjectives as a linguistic means of describing gender within cultural mores and norms.

Nineteenth century data shows that adjectives ...


Teaching: Natural Or Cultural?, David F. Lancy 2016 Utah State University

Teaching: Natural Or Cultural?, David F. Lancy

SSWA Faculty Publications

In this chapter I argue that teaching, as we now understand the term, is historically and cross-culturally very rare. It appears to be unnecessary to transmit culture or to socialize children. Children are, on the other hand, primed by evolution to be avid observers, imitators, players and helpers—roles that reveal the profoundly autonomous and self-directed nature of culture acquisition (Lancy in press a). And yet, teaching is ubiquitous throughout the modern world—at least among the middle to upper class segment of the population. This ubiquity has led numerous scholars to argue for the universality and uniqueness of teaching ...


Teaching.Natural Or Cultural?, David Lancy 2016 Utah State University

Teaching.Natural Or Cultural?, David Lancy

David Lancy

In this chapter I argue that teaching, as we now understand the term, is historically and cross-culturally very rare.  It appears to be unnecessary to transmit culture or to socialize children. Children are, on the other hand, primed by evolution to be avid observers, imitators, players and helpers—roles that reveal the profoundly autonomous and self-directed nature of culture acquisition (Lancy in press a). And yet, teaching is ubiquitous throughout the modern world—at least among the middle to upper class segment of the population. This ubiquity has led numerous scholars to argue for the universality and uniqueness of teaching ...


Global Childhoods, Asian Lifeworlds: After School Time In Hong Kong, Nicola Yelland, Sandy Muspratt, Caja Gilbert 2016 Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia

Global Childhoods, Asian Lifeworlds: After School Time In Hong Kong, Nicola Yelland, Sandy Muspratt, Caja Gilbert

Occasional Paper Series

Explores home spaces through a cultural lens, asking questions about eastern and western perceptions of home learning.


What (And Where) Is The ‘Learning’ When We Talk About Learning In The Home?, Julian Sefton-Green 2016 London School of Economics

What (And Where) Is The ‘Learning’ When We Talk About Learning In The Home?, Julian Sefton-Green

Occasional Paper Series

In this paper, I will build on the proposal that we need to pay attention to both of these frames through characterizing the metadiscourse surrounding learning in the home. I suggest that this metadiscourse is made up of several elements. I will show how a number of families — the subjects of a larger research project that investigates learning across time and contexts — adopt and use folk “ theories of learning,” and I will consider, in particular, how such theories relate to dominant discourses around learning in school. Second, I will explore how media technologies — and in particular, how the ways that ...


D-Place: A Global Database Of Cultural, Linguistic And Environmental Diversity, Kathryn R. Kirby, Russell D. Gray, Simon J. Greenhill, Fiona M. Jordan, Stephanie Gomes-Ng, Hans-Jörg Bibiko, Damián E. Blasi, Carlos A. Botero, Claire Bowern, Carol R. Ember, Dan Leehr, Bobbi S. Low, Joe McCarter, William Divale, Michael C. Gavin 2016 Washington University in St. Louis

D-Place: A Global Database Of Cultural, Linguistic And Environmental Diversity, Kathryn R. Kirby, Russell D. Gray, Simon J. Greenhill, Fiona M. Jordan, Stephanie Gomes-Ng, Hans-Jörg Bibiko, Damián E. Blasi, Carlos A. Botero, Claire Bowern, Carol R. Ember, Dan Leehr, Bobbi S. Low, Joe Mccarter, William Divale, Michael C. Gavin

Biology Faculty Publications & Presentations

From the foods we eat and the houses we construct, to our religious practices and political organization, to who we can marry and the types of games we teach our children, the diversity of cultural practices in the world is astounding. Yet, our ability to visualize and understand this diversity is limited by the ways it has been documented and shared: on a culture-by-culture basis, in locally-told stories or difficult-to-access repositories. In this paper we introduce D-PLACE, the Database of Places, Language, Culture, and Environment. This expandable and open-access database (accessible at https://d-place.org) brings together a dispersed corpus ...


The Existential Territories Of Global Childhoods: Resingularizing Subjectivity Through Ecologies, Laura Trafí-Prats 2016 Bank Street College of Education

The Existential Territories Of Global Childhoods: Resingularizing Subjectivity Through Ecologies, Laura Trafí-Prats

Occasional Paper Series

Draws upon photography to discuss the construction of childhood within the ecological spaces of globalization.


The Environmental Heritage And Wellness Assessment: Applying Quantitative Techniques To Traditional Ecological Knowledge And Wellness Relationships, Kristina Baines 2016 CUNY, Guttman Community College

The Environmental Heritage And Wellness Assessment: Applying Quantitative Techniques To Traditional Ecological Knowledge And Wellness Relationships, Kristina Baines

Journal of Ecological Anthropology

This paper quantifies relationships between health and traditional ecological knowledge/practices in a Mopan Maya community in southern Belize, illuminating how changes in daily practices might be related to changes in wellness. Findings from statistical analyses of data related to household practices are presented. These data were collected using a Likert survey designed based on previously collected ethnographic and pile sort data related to health and heritage, and then administered to households in the community (n=64). The paper concludes that the data, while exploratory, show links between higher scores on both the health and heritage indices and warrant further ...


Anthropological Studies On South Asian Pilgrimage: Case Of Buddhist Pilgrimage In Sri Lanka, Premakumara de Silva 2016 University of Colombo

Anthropological Studies On South Asian Pilgrimage: Case Of Buddhist Pilgrimage In Sri Lanka, Premakumara De Silva

International Journal of Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage

Anthropological studies relating to South Asian pilgrimage have been of several types. Interest in the field can be traced back to at the time when Victor Turner was writing on this subject (notably, the works of Vidyarthi, 1961, 1979; Jha, 1985, 1995; Bhardwaj, 1973 and; Bharati, 1970). Among the relevant ethnographies for South Asia there are a number of studies which mainly concentrate on describing a pilgrimage centre or sacred place. In general, the emphasis of these studies is on priests, the organization of the pilgrim centres, and other occupants of the pilgrimage centres; in other words, they are more ...


Revitalizing The Ethnosphere: Global Society, Ethnodiversity, And The Stakes Of Cultural Genocide, Christopher Powell Ph.D. 2016 Ryerson University

Revitalizing The Ethnosphere: Global Society, Ethnodiversity, And The Stakes Of Cultural Genocide, Christopher Powell Ph.D.

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

This paper uses the concepts of ethnosphere and ethnodiversity to frame the stakes of cultural genocide in the context of the emerging global society. We are in an era of rapid global ethnodiversity loss. Global ethnodiversity is important because different cultures produce different solutions to the subjective and objective problems of human society, and because cultures have an intrinsic value. Rapid ethnodiversity loss is a byproduct of the expansion of the modern world-system, and Lemkin’s invention of the concept of genocide can be understood as a dialectical reaction to this tendency. The current phase of globalization creates pressures towards ...


Saving Animals: Everyday Practices Of Care And Rescue In The Us Animal Sanctuary Movement, Elan L. Abrell 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Saving Animals: Everyday Practices Of Care And Rescue In The Us Animal Sanctuary Movement, Elan L. Abrell

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This multi-sited ethnography of the US animal sanctuary movement is based on 24 months of research at a range of animal rescue facilities, including a companion animal shelter in Texas, exotic animal sanctuaries in Florida and Hawaii, and a farm animal sanctuary in New York. In the last three decades, animal welfare activists have established hundreds of sanctuaries across the United States in an attempt to save tens of thousands of animals from factory farms, roadside zoos, and other sites of contested animal treatment. These facilities function as laboratories where activists conceive and operationalize new models for ethical relationships with ...


Beaches, People, And Change: A Political Ecology Of Rockaway Beach After Hurricane Sandy, Bryce B. DuBois 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Beaches, People, And Change: A Political Ecology Of Rockaway Beach After Hurricane Sandy, Bryce B. Dubois

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation uses restoration practices of Rockaway beach post-Hurricane Sandy as a lens to investigate tensions between nature and society on urban coasts. By focusing on this New York City beach, this dissertation aims to examine the interaction between the beach, residents, city and federal agencies, and local environmental grassroots stewards in their response to coastal flooding and erosion. This is an ethnographic case study of Rockaway Beach during the two years (October 2012-October 2014) following Hurricane Sandy. This case study is based on secondary data analysis of interviews with 52 key informants, field-notes from participant observation at community and ...


Evolving Patterns: Conflicting Perceptions Of Cultural Preservation And The State Of Batik’S Cultural Inheritance Among Women Artisans In Guizhou, China, Katherine B. Uram 2016 Lawrence University

Evolving Patterns: Conflicting Perceptions Of Cultural Preservation And The State Of Batik’S Cultural Inheritance Among Women Artisans In Guizhou, China, Katherine B. Uram

Lawrence University Honors Projects

My exploration features Miao batik-making in Guizhou Province and explores several sets of overlapping questions. The first set focuses on the status of the craft of Miao batik-making and the perceptions of its future. Is batik-making a dying art form? To what extent is Batik-making a thriving cultural practice today, or do Miao in China (and other ethnic groups involved in batik-making) perceive an inheritance crisis? My next focus is on the role of institutions and the tourism industry. If taught less and less in the domestic sphere (traditions passed from mother to daughter), what role do public domains such ...


Review: 'High Risk And High Stakes: Health Professionals, Politics And Policy', Patrick G. Donnelly 2016 University of Dayton

Review: 'High Risk And High Stakes: Health Professionals, Politics And Policy', Patrick G. Donnelly

Patrick Donnelly

Many studies of the law and policy creation process examine the efforts of particular interest groups and coalitions to influence the views and votes of legislators. Wysong focuses on the role of professional associations, specifically associations of health care professionals, in the legislative debate over the High Risk Occupational Disease Notification and Prevention Act, an example of what is most commonly known as "right-to-know" legislation.

The ethical codes and service-oriented goals of professions suggest that associations of professionals might act differently than interest groups. Wysong shows that the core groups in debates over health and safety legislation recognize that their ...


Spots On A Gnat’S Ass, Good Soldiers, And Sociology Departments: Stan Saxton’S Pragmatist Approach To Sociology, Dan E. Miller, Fred P. Pestello, Patrick G. Donnelly 2016 University of Dayton

Spots On A Gnat’S Ass, Good Soldiers, And Sociology Departments: Stan Saxton’S Pragmatist Approach To Sociology, Dan E. Miller, Fred P. Pestello, Patrick G. Donnelly

Patrick Donnelly

Most academics build their careers and establish reputations in the traditional manner, through research and publications. Certainly, this is not the only way to secure a place in the lore of academia. Some are great teachers who gather a large following of students. Still others get involved in professional organizations. While Stan Saxton had a respectable record of publications, was a masterful teacher, and a marvelous critic, his notable contributions to sociology came through his organizational work as a chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Dayton. After his tenure as chair, Stan continued to ...


Urban Sprawl, Patrick G. Donnelly 2016 University of Dayton

Urban Sprawl, Patrick G. Donnelly

Patrick Donnelly

In the early 21st century, urban sprawl continues to be a source of considerable controversy and political debate, yet many Americans quietly accept sprawl. They express their acceptance by moving farther away from central cities into housing and business developments on land that was formerly rural and undeveloped. While a significant number of suburban communities have existed in the United States since the late 19th century, the greatest growth in suburbs occurred after World War II.

At the dawn of the 20th century, the suburban population represented less than 12 percent of the total U.S. population. By 1950, that ...


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