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Teaching: Natural Or Cultural?, David F. Lancy 2016 Utah State University

Teaching: Natural Or Cultural?, David F. Lancy

David Lancy

This chapter will argue that teaching, as we now understand the term, is historically and cross-culturally very rare. It appears to be unnecessary to transmit culture or to socialize children. Children are, on the other hand, primed by evolution to be avid observers, imitators, players and helpers—roles that reveal the profoundly autonomous and self-directed nature of culture acquisition (Lancy in press a). And yet, teaching is ubiquitous throughout the modern world—at least among the middle to upper class segment of the population. This ubiquity has led numerous scholars to argue for the universality and uniqueness of teaching as ...


Paleo-Psychology: A Brief Introduction. Reintroducing, Reapplying, And Justifying An “Ancient Perspective”, Jorge Conesa-Sevilla PhD 2015 Unaffiliated

Paleo-Psychology: A Brief Introduction. Reintroducing, Reapplying, And Justifying An “Ancient Perspective”, Jorge Conesa-Sevilla Phd

Jorge Conesa-Sevilla PhD

The historical antecedents of and call for “paleopsychology” emerged in tandem with early 20th century efforts, both to synthesize and unify the work of biology, anthropology, sociology, and psychology, and to expand the scope of the comparative sciences (evolutionary biology and psychology): “Our veneer of civilization has only commenced to acquire the slightest degree of fixation.” (Jelliffe, 1923)


Chamois Paleo-Psychology, Jorge Conesa-Sevilla PhD 2015 Unaffiliated

Chamois Paleo-Psychology, Jorge Conesa-Sevilla Phd

Jorge Conesa-Sevilla PhD

To all of us who have shared in the same primal affectation, a-sense-of-place and a-sense-of-the-animal both wrapped into ONE-emotion-instinct, the line between “serious leisure” and “recreational specialization” is happily blurred and indistinguishable to the surprise of academics. These experiences brought, in the words of an unknown writer, “...a certain psychology of the woods.”


An Ethnography Of Taste: Craft Beer Culture In Hattiesburg, Yingkun Hou 2015 The University of Southern Mississippi

An Ethnography Of Taste: Craft Beer Culture In Hattiesburg, Yingkun Hou

Master's Theses

This thesis studies the craft beer culture in Hattiesburg in order to answer the research question: Is taste what draws people to this culture? Beyond conducting classic participant-observation, I deployed the method of sensory activated participant-observation in my fieldwork. In so doing, this research centers the perspective and the data collected on the senses, especially the taste of craft beer. The purpose of this research is to add to our knowledge of the anthropology of the senses and contribute to the literature on the anthropology of taste.


Philosopher's Stone: The Faustian Geist Of Development, Salikyu Sangtam 2015 University of Southern Mississippi

Philosopher's Stone: The Faustian Geist Of Development, Salikyu Sangtam

Dissertations

The present study juxtaposes scientific rationality with polyphonic rationality in respect to societal development. This is done to illuminate how scientific rationality provides a narrow and truncated view of development. In order to explicate the exclusion of polyphonic rationalities/knowledges in favor of scientific rationality, several development scholarships are examined along with an episode of developmental scheme and two episodes of development programs. This is done to expound (note: ‘→’ = influences) how scientific rationalityscholarshipsorganizational/institutional schemes, such as the MDGs → actual applications of development schemes, such as transmigration and compulsory villagization. The present inquest, more importantly, propounds for polyphonic ...


Patterns Of Indigenous Learning: An Ethnographic Study On How Kindergartners Learn In Mana, Fiji, Jeffrey Chih-Yih Lee, Paul Sparks 2015 Brandman University

Patterns Of Indigenous Learning: An Ethnographic Study On How Kindergartners Learn In Mana, Fiji, Jeffrey Chih-Yih Lee, Paul Sparks

FIRE: Forum for International Research in Education

Technology has greatly impacted educational systems around the world, even in the most geographically isolated places. This study utilizes an ethnographic approach to examine the patterns of learning in a kindergarten in Mana, Fiji. Data comprised of interviews, observations and examination of related artifacts. The results provide baseline data for a larger study examining the evolution of learning patterns after iPads were introduced to the Mana school. Data were examined through two frameworks: Multiple Intelligence and 21st Century Skills during the baseline study; the same two frameworks will be utilized in the next round of data analysis. A comparative ...


The Nêhiyawak Nation Through Âcimowina: Experiencing Plains Cree Knowledge Through Oral Narratives, Paulina Johnson 2015 Uiversity of Western Ontario

The Nêhiyawak Nation Through Âcimowina: Experiencing Plains Cree Knowledge Through Oral Narratives, Paulina Johnson

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

Nêhiyawîhcikêwin, Plains Cree Culture, is an oral culture that shares their wisdom, insights, teachings, and warnings through the voices of the elders to the generations that will one day fill their place. Oral narratives have been used by the Nehiyawak nation for hundreds and if not thousands of years, and for particular interest we will focus on âcimowina, oral narratives of a time after Wîsahêcâhk, Elder Brother, but also touch on aspects of âtayôhkêwina, sacred stories that account how the world was shaped, when animals and humans could talk, and when Wîsahêcâhk transformed the ...


Emergence And Progression Of Acadian Ethnic And Political Identities: Alliance And Land-Based Inter-Peoples Relations In Early Acadia To Today, Katie K. MacLeod 2015 Dalhousie University

Emergence And Progression Of Acadian Ethnic And Political Identities: Alliance And Land-Based Inter-Peoples Relations In Early Acadia To Today, Katie K. Macleod

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

This article provides an ethnohistorical overview of the emergence and progression of Acadian ethnic and political identities over time. Strongly based in their relations with the Mi’kmaq during the colonization of Nova Scotia, the Acadians became a unique political entity who identified themselves as neutral. Through the advances made in the colony, British authorities soon realized that the alliance formed between the Acadians and Mi’kmaq could present a threat. This article provides background for the reemerging Acadian-Mi’kmaq relations occurring today around environmental and land-based concerns and seeks to provide the reader with an overview of the shifting ...


Bodies Of Information: Human-Animal Entanglement At Çatalhöyük And Cis-Baikal As Seen Through Zooarchaeology, John Vandergugten 2015 Simon Fraser University

Bodies Of Information: Human-Animal Entanglement At Çatalhöyük And Cis-Baikal As Seen Through Zooarchaeology, John Vandergugten

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

Zooarchaeology—the study of the human past through animal remains—has often been said to demonstrate that animals have had a variety of tangible roles in relation to human individuals and cultures throughout time: from sources of food to implements of labour. In contrast, intangible aspects of the human-animal relationship have been generally unrecognized and only recently appreciated within (zoo)archaeological discourse. Through exploratory case studies of research at the sites of Çatalhöyük and Cis-Baikal, it is suggested here that new modes of reflecting upon human-animal bonds are necessary in order to better understand the multifarious meanings and uses of ...


Research Reflections: Queering The Ethnographer, Queering Male Sex Work, Nathan Dawthorne 2015 Western University

Research Reflections: Queering The Ethnographer, Queering Male Sex Work, Nathan Dawthorne

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

This paper is a reflection on an ethnographic moment that occurred as I sought the narratives of male sex workers specific to London, Ontario, a mid-sized Canadian city. Here an informant effectively queered my inadvertent erasure of men-who-sell-sex-to-women during the initial phases of fieldwork. In order to understand what happened, I explore the important role of reflexivity to negotiate productive misunderstandings that occurred and to illuminate the assumptions I made. To provide a contextualized account of the phenomenon of male sex work ultimately requires that I move beyond homonormative (or any normative) pre/conceptualizations avoiding and acknowledging the re/production ...


Keeping Crm Archaeology Relevant: Presenting An Archaeology Of Children And Childhood In The Past, Katelyn E. Mather 2015 University of Western Ontario

Keeping Crm Archaeology Relevant: Presenting An Archaeology Of Children And Childhood In The Past, Katelyn E. Mather

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

The industry of cultural resource management (CRM) has been criticized for its failure to communicate research results publicly, and to make contributions on a local and global scale. In this paper, I suggest that school-based archaeology programs – either through mock archaeological digs, participation in actual excavations, or the use of specific material culture types to tell stories about the past – provide a means to make CRM archaeology relevant to a wider audience. I also propose that an effective teaching tool about local archaeology would be to create a program on the archaeology of children and childhood. This would be an ...


Powers Of The Dead: Struggles Over Paper Money Burning In Urban China, Mingyuan Zhang 2015 University of Western Ontario

Powers Of The Dead: Struggles Over Paper Money Burning In Urban China, Mingyuan Zhang

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

This paper explores how the Chinese customary ritual of burning paper money to commemorate the dead ancestors challenges the nature-culture dichotomy. The paper argues that the practice of burning paper money reflects a Chinese cosmology that is not based on a dichotomy between the living and the dead, instead, the dead is often mobilized to exert influential power over the living. The paper money that people use in such rituals are active actors that participates in people’s social, cultural and economic life. The paper also investigates how the conflict between government policy and traditional practice demonstrates that the modernists ...


“A Man Without A Country”: Experiences Of Francophone Migration During The Quiet Revolution, Jessie K. Tougas 2015 University of British Columbia

“A Man Without A Country”: Experiences Of Francophone Migration During The Quiet Revolution, Jessie K. Tougas

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

There are numerous studies on shifting Francophone-Anglophone relations during the Quiet Revolution, and migration studies tend to focus on Anglophones who sought opportunity outside Québec (Pettinicchio 2012). However, less attention has been paid to the experiences of Francophones who migrated to English Canada during this period. Undeniably, these people had their own unique political, economic and social motivations for leaving Québec at this time. Their adopted communities brought experiences of cultural assimilation and language loss, which have been previously explored in relation to First Peoples in Canada and the indigenous groups of other countries (e.g. Hallett et al. 2007 ...


Identification Of Whole Mitochondrial Genomes From Venezuela And Implications On Regional Phylogenies In South America, Esther J. Lee, D. Andrew Merriwether 2015 Texas Tech University

Identification Of Whole Mitochondrial Genomes From Venezuela And Implications On Regional Phylogenies In South America, Esther J. Lee, D. Andrew Merriwether

Human Biology Open Access Pre-Prints

Recent studies have expanded and refined the founding haplogroups of the Americas using whole mitochondrial (mtDNA) genome analysis. In addition to pan-American lineages, a number of studies have identified specific variants that show higher frequencies in restricted geographical areas. In order to further characterize Native American maternal lineages and specifically examine local patterns within South America, we analyzed twelve maternally unrelated Yekuana whole mtDNA genomes from one village (Sharamaña) that include the four major Native American haplogroups A2, B2, C1, and D1. Our study proposes a reconfiguration of one subhaplogroup A2 (A2aa) that is specific to South America and identifies ...


Identity-Based Conflict And Print Media, Sunil Kumar Pokhrel 2015 Kennesaw State University

Identity-Based Conflict And Print Media, Sunil Kumar Pokhrel

Dissertations, Theses and Capstone Projects

Despite the formal abolishment of the discriminative caste system in Nepal in 1963, caste still influences social, economic, and political sectors of Hindu society. Indicators and existing research suggest that caste-based discrimination remains one of the major sources of unrest in a Hindu majority nation such as Nepal. Questions remain, however, about the media‘s role in caste-based identity conflict. This dissertation seeks to answer the question: How do various print media outlets (i.e., public vs. private) depict Pahadi identity-based conflicts in contemporary Nepal? In this study, I employed focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews with Nepalese opinion leaders ...


A Spatial Analysis Of Artifacts Using A Geographic Information System At The Grand Portage North West Company Fur Trade Depot (21ck06), Andrew L. Craft 2015 St. Cloud State University

A Spatial Analysis Of Artifacts Using A Geographic Information System At The Grand Portage North West Company Fur Trade Depot (21ck06), Andrew L. Craft

Culminating Projects in Cultural Resource Management

From around 1780 to 1803, the Grand Portage North West Company Fur Trade Depot stood on the western shores of Lake Superior in northern Minnesota. The location served as the company’s inland headquarters along their primary trade route through the region now called the Boundary Waters. Some areas of the site have been partially excavated and examined, but none of the artifact datasets or structural features discovered through archaeology has been analyzed using the computer technology of geographic information systems (GIS). For the first time, GIS is used to spatially distribute one of the site’s artifact datasets from ...


Leashes And Lies: Navigating The Colonial Tensions Of Institutional Ethics Of Research Involving Indigenous Peoples In Canada, Martha L. Stiegman, Heather Castleden 2015 York University

Leashes And Lies: Navigating The Colonial Tensions Of Institutional Ethics Of Research Involving Indigenous Peoples In Canada, Martha L. Stiegman, Heather Castleden

The International Indigenous Policy Journal

Ethical standards of conduct in research undertaken at Canadian universities involving humans has been guided by the three federal research funding agencies through the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (or TCPS for short) since 1998. The statement was revised for the first time in 2010 and is now commonly referred to as the TCPS2, which includes an entire chapter (Chapter 9) devoted to the subject of research involving First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples of Canada. While the establishment of TCPS2 is an important initial step on the long road towards decolonizing Indigenous research within the ...


Late Taino Occupation Of Jamaica: A Zooarchaeological Analysis Of Faunal Materials From The Bluefields Bay Site, Diana M. Azevedo 2015 Utah State University

Late Taino Occupation Of Jamaica: A Zooarchaeological Analysis Of Faunal Materials From The Bluefields Bay Site, Diana M. Azevedo

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

My thesis seeks to answer the broad questions: can early foragers alter marine resources in island settings and can archaeological data provide insights into these changes. These questions highlight two important issues. The first issue reflects the common belief that small-scale societies did not affect their environments. The second issue centers on growing concern over the collapse of fisheries across the globe.

To answer these questions, I use fish bones recovered from an archaeological site located in Belmont, Jamaica near the Bluefields Bay marine sanctuary. The Bluefields Bay site dates to the late Taíno occupation of Jamaica. The name Taíno ...


Group Conversation M2-06: Transcription, Vann Corpus 1995, Robert E. Vann 2015 Western Michigan University

Group Conversation M2-06: Transcription, Vann Corpus 1995, Robert E. Vann

DARDOSIPCAT: Transcriptions

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Changing Climates, Fading Cultures: A Study Of Place Annihilation As A Result Of Climate Change, Brooks A. Bolsinger 2015 Seattle Pacific University

Changing Climates, Fading Cultures: A Study Of Place Annihilation As A Result Of Climate Change, Brooks A. Bolsinger

Honors Projects

Abstract

Research has established the phenomenon of cultural annihilation: the notion that the members of cultures can perceive a sense of loss when the geography upon which their culture is built undergoes a dramatic destructive change. This review examines prevailing literature to uncover existing and expected ways that climate change will impact cultures, specifically damaging the shared history that is infused into the geographic traits that make up a culture’s homeland. It examines three case studies - Native American tribes in Alaska, the island nation of the Maldives, and the country of the Netherlands – to highlight vulnerabilities that these three ...


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