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Technology Then And Now 6: Flintlock Muskets, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 6: Flintlock Muskets, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Flintlocks were imported from Europe and widely distributed in New France for hunting and warfare.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and Michael Worline.

Full size ...


Technology Then And Now 5: Birch Bark Canoes, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 5: Birch Bark Canoes, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Birch bark canoes were a technologically-sophisticated means to travel and transport goods during the fur trade.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and Michael Worline.

Full ...


Technology Then And Now 4: Hide Processing In The Fur Trade, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 4: Hide Processing In The Fur Trade, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Native Americans were the primary procedures of hides in the fur trade.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and Michael Worline.

Full size panel available as ...


Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2017 Annual Report, Michael Nassaney 2018 Western Michigan University

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2017 Annual Report, Michael Nassaney

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

In 2017, the Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project (hereafter the "Project") continued its focus on discovering and sharing the history of Fort St. Joseph while emphasizing the importance of community partnerships. This was a logical theme for 2017 since the Project has long been a collaboration between Western Michigan University (WMU) faculty and students, the City of Niles, the Fort St. Joseph Archaeology Advisory Committee (see Appendix A), interested stakeholders, supporters, members, and community volunteers in the greater Niles area. In addition, the Project has embraced a community service-learning model to guide our field, laboratory, and outreach activities. Students learn ...


Technology Then And Now 3: Building A House In New France, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 3: Building A House In New France, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph buildings were constructed using Old World techniques and local and imported raw materials.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and Michael Worline.

Full ...


Technology Then And Now 2: Glass Beads, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 2: Glass Beads, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

People at Fort St. Joseph used glass beads to embellish their appearance in the eighteenth century.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and Michael Worline.

Full ...


Technology Then And Now 1: Technology Then And Now, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project 2018 Western Michigan University

Technology Then And Now 1: Technology Then And Now, Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project

Archaeologists employ technology to learn how goods were made and used at Fort St. Joseph in the eighteenth century.

Technology Then and Now was developed by the students (Nicole Aquino, John Campbell, Patrick Dwyer, Abby Floyd, Jacob Kowalczyk, Allie Lewis, Amanda Owens, Brendan Sapato, and Callisto Wojcikowski) in the Museum Studies class (HIST 4080) at Western Michigan University under the direction of Professor Michael Nassaney. The research, contents, and design of the exhibit were made possible through the support and assistance of Christina Arseneau, David Brose, Mary Ellen Drolet, Joe Hines, Larry Horrigan, Cori Ivens, Erika Loveland, Meghan Williams and ...


Pseudoarchaeology: Archaeology's Long-Lost Cousin?, Rebekah Gansemer 2018 University of Iowa

Pseudoarchaeology: Archaeology's Long-Lost Cousin?, Rebekah Gansemer

Honors Theses at the University of Iowa

The belief that in the ancient past, our ancestors were visited by extraterrestrials has enraptured audiences. Ancient alien theorists find ‘proof’ of these visitations in the many prehistoric archaeological sites. These theories have persisted for decades despite the wishes of many in academia—most especially archaeologists who are most closely associated with and work on many of the sites where supposed ‘evidence’ can be found. Academic archaeologist are quick to denounce these theories and distance themselves from those they consider ‘pseudoarchaeologists’ or non-scientific theorists. It is my argument that pseudoarchaeology and academic archaeology are not in fact related disciplines that ...


Residue Analysis Of Smoking Pipe Fragments From The Feltus Archaeological Site, Southeastern North America, Stephen B. Carmody, Megan C. Kassabaum, Ryan K. Hunt, Natalie Prodanovich, Hope Elliott, Jon Russ 2017 University of Pennsylvania

Residue Analysis Of Smoking Pipe Fragments From The Feltus Archaeological Site, Southeastern North America, Stephen B. Carmody, Megan C. Kassabaum, Ryan K. Hunt, Natalie Prodanovich, Hope Elliott, Jon Russ

Megan C Kassabaum

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The practice of pipe smoking was commonplace among indigenous cultures of the Eastern Woodlands of North
America. However, many questions remain concerning what materials were smoked and when tobacco first
became a part of this smoking tradition. Chemical analysis of organic residues extracted from archaeological
smoking pipes is an encouraging avenue of research into answering questions regarding the development of a
smoking complex within indigenous cultures of the Eastern Woodlands. In the right environmental conditions,
absorbed organic compounds within ...


Gathering In The Late Woodland: Plazas And Gathering Places As Everyday Space, Casey R. Barrier, Megan C. Kassabaum 2017 Bryn Mawr College

Gathering In The Late Woodland: Plazas And Gathering Places As Everyday Space, Casey R. Barrier, Megan C. Kassabaum

Megan C Kassabaum

No abstract provided.


The Moorehead Phase Occupation At The Emerald Acropolis, Jacob Skousen 2017 Parkland College

The Moorehead Phase Occupation At The Emerald Acropolis, Jacob Skousen

Jacob Skousen

The Emerald site, also known as the Emerald Acropolis, was an early Mississippian pilgrimage center key to Cahokia's development. This paper presents the hitherto unpublished results of two archaeological projects conducted at the site, one led by Howard Winters and Stuart Struever in 1961 and the other by Robert Hall in 1964. These investigations produced the most comprehensive information on Emerald's Moorehead phase (1200-1300 CE) occupation during which two of its mounds were capped, a secondary mound was constructed on the central mound, and a mound-top structure was erected on this secondary mound. Similar activities took place throughout ...


Household Activities And Areas: A Reanalysis Of The John And Priscilla Alden First Home Site, Caroline Gardiner 2017 University of Massachusetts Boston

Household Activities And Areas: A Reanalysis Of The John And Priscilla Alden First Home Site, Caroline Gardiner

Graduate Masters Theses

This thesis seeks to further understanding of early colonial life within New England through an examination of the John and Priscilla Alden First Home site in Duxbury, MA, excavated in 1960 by Roland Robbins. It specifically focuses on the composition and spatial distribution of the ceramic assemblage to discuss household activities and the spaces in which they were performed. The findings of the ceramic analysis detail a collection composed primarily of utilitarian vessels that indicate multiple subsistence farming activities including dairying. The spatial study reveals the significant patterning of these artifacts. It is proposed that these denote specific activity areas ...


Peruvian Antiquities And The Collecting Of Cultural Goods, Terrence H. Witkowski 2017 California State University, Long Beach

Peruvian Antiquities And The Collecting Of Cultural Goods, Terrence H. Witkowski

Markets, Globalization & Development Review

Ancient art, artifacts, and architecture have long excited the intellectual curiosity and acquisitive passions of private and institutional collectors who, in turn, have funded archaeological research, preservation initiatives, and public education. Yet, the procurement of these goods also has encouraged looting and trafficking activities. Supplying collectors has destroyed much cultural evidence in source countries and has raised questions about who should control heritage and history. This article investigates the market for Peruvian antiquities, the surviving material culture created by the country’s inhabitants before the Spanish Conquest. It briefly reviews Peru’s early history and the history of collecting its ...


Protected: Arsenic And Old Pelts: Deadly Pesticides In Museum Collections, Alice B. Kehoe, Marshall Joseph Becker 2017 Marquette University

Protected: Arsenic And Old Pelts: Deadly Pesticides In Museum Collections, Alice B. Kehoe, Marshall Joseph Becker

Anthropology & Sociology

No abstract provided.


Gis Modeling Of The Andean Coastline Through The Holocene, Chelsea E. Cheney 2017 University of Wyoming

Gis Modeling Of The Andean Coastline Through The Holocene, Chelsea E. Cheney

Honors Theses AY 17/18

Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to model the Andean coastline and reviewing literature to compile Holocene epoch archaeological sites are vital, preliminary steps in beginning research on an overall, interdisciplinary project currently titled: “12,000 Years of Life by the Sea: Bringing Holocene Archaeological Data to Bear on Human-Coastal Interaction and Contemporary Coastal Ecology and Conservation.” The greater project aims to address broad questions regarding long-term climate change, the periodicity and intensity of El Niño events, and coastal ecology and conservation through the application of archaeological data from the coastline of Peru. By modeling bathymetry, classifying potential coastline levels throughout ...


Common Goods In Uncommon Times: Water, Droughts, And The Sustainability Of Ancestral Pueblo Communities In The Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, Ad 1100-1700, Michael Aiuvalasit 2017 Southern Methodist University

Common Goods In Uncommon Times: Water, Droughts, And The Sustainability Of Ancestral Pueblo Communities In The Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, Ad 1100-1700, Michael Aiuvalasit

Anthropology Theses and Dissertations

Adapting our infrastructure and institutions to climate change is a crucial dilemma for modern society. Archaeologists should be well positioned to address this issue with examples from the past. Yet, too often when we find that cultural changes are synchronous with climate variation, such as abandonment of a region during a drought, we advance causal arguments to what may merely be correlations. I argue that identifying proxies for resource management in the archaeological record, particularly for resources managed by collective action and vulnerable to climate change, can help to address this problem. To test this approach I studied water management ...


Cosmology Performed, The World Transformed: Mimesis And The Logical Operations Of Nature And Culture In Myth In Amazonia And Beyond, Deon Liebenberg 2017 Cape Peninsula University of Technology

Cosmology Performed, The World Transformed: Mimesis And The Logical Operations Of Nature And Culture In Myth In Amazonia And Beyond, Deon Liebenberg

Tipití: Journal of the Society for the Anthropology of Lowland South America

By analyzing myths from around the world to build an argument regarding the relation between cosmology and community, Amazonian myths are set within a broader set of mythic imageries. Lévi-Strauss showed how a structural description of myth should fully incorporate the entire set of variant arrangements through which its elements or terms could be related to one another. Despite the criticism to which his approach has been subject (references?), the notion that certain kinds of logical operations could be gleaned in the organization of myth continues to yield valuable insights. In this paper, I contend that the mimetic representation of ...


Levi Levering's Headdress: Blurring Borders And Bridging Cultures, Margaret Bruchac 2017 University of Pennsylvania

Levi Levering's Headdress: Blurring Borders And Bridging Cultures, Margaret Bruchac

Department of Anthropology Papers

The feather headdress labeled 38-2-1 in the Penn Museum Collection is richly colored and composed of many types of materials. It consists of a felt cap with a leather forehead band covered with a panel of vivid loomed beadwork (in orange, blue, yellow, and white tipi shapes) and two beaded rosettes (blue, yellow, white, and red) on either end of the band. Hanging from each side are ear pendants made of buckskin with metal beads attached, and dyed downy feathers and long ribbons trail from the headdress. Extending from the top of the band are felt cylinders (faded perhaps due ...


Archaeology: Puzzle Of The Past: An Exhibit Design, Kristine Eyheralde 2017 University of Northern Iowa

Archaeology: Puzzle Of The Past: An Exhibit Design, Kristine Eyheralde

Presidential Scholars Theses (1990 – 2006)

Archaeology: Puzzle of the Past is a design for a museum exhibit to better explain archaeology to the public. Its purpose is to change the audience's perspective from one of object orientation to visualization of archaeology as a process. The exhibit utilizes a chronological and concrete approach to move the visitors through the major steps in the archaeological process -- including survey, excavation, labwork, and interpretation -- as they occur within the parameters of a fictitious archaeological site. In addition, interactive exercises are designed to be included within each area to reinforce the message.


Biological Distance Between Flexed And Supine Burials At The Ancient Greek City Of Himera Using Dental Nonmetric Data, Jessica Czapla 2017 UNC

Biological Distance Between Flexed And Supine Burials At The Ancient Greek City Of Himera Using Dental Nonmetric Data, Jessica Czapla

Ursidae: The Undergraduate Research Journal at the University of Northern Colorado

We investigate potential differences in genetic relatedness of flexed and supine burials from Himera, a Greek colony on Sicily (648-409 BCE), using biodistance analysis of nonmetric dental traits to explore whether locals adopted Greek burial styles, Greek and local customs hybridized, and/or each group maintained distinct burial styles. In other contexts, supine burials have been associated with Greeks, and flexed burials have been interpreted as representing indigenous individuals. Thus, we hypothesize that supine burials will be more closely related to Greeks from Euboea (indirect founders of Himera) and flexed burials will be genetically distinct, possibly representing locals. To test ...


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