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One-Dimensional Weakly Nonlinear Model Equations For Rossby Waves, David Henry, Rossen Ivanov 2014 Dublin Institute of Technology

One-Dimensional Weakly Nonlinear Model Equations For Rossby Waves, David Henry, Rossen Ivanov

Articles

In this study we explore several possibilities for modelling weakly nonlinear Rossby waves in fluid of constant depth, which propagate predominantly in one direction. The model equations obtained include the BBM equation, as well as the integrable KdV and Degasperis-Procesi equations.


Algebraic Properties Of Ext-Modules Over Complete Intersections, Jason Hardin 2014 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Algebraic Properties Of Ext-Modules Over Complete Intersections, Jason Hardin

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research Papers in Mathematics

We investigate two algebraic properties of Ext-modules over a complete intersection R of codimension c. Given an R-module M, Ext(M,k) can be viewed as a graded module over a polynomial ring in c variables with an action given by the Eisenbud operators. We provide an upper bound on the degrees of the generators of this graded module in terms of the regularities of two associated coherent sheaves. In the codimension two case, our bound recovers a bound of Avramov and Buchweitz in terms of the Betti numbers of M. We also provide a description of the differential graded ...


Boundary Value Problems Of Nabla Fractional Difference Equations, Abigail M. Brackins 2014 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Boundary Value Problems Of Nabla Fractional Difference Equations, Abigail M. Brackins

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research Papers in Mathematics

In this dissertation we develop the theory of the nabla fractional self-adjoint difference equation,

aν(p∇y)(t)+q(t)y(ρ(t)) = f(t),

where 0 < ν < 1.We begin with an introduction to the nabla fractional calculus. In the second chapter, we show existence and uniqueness of the solution to a fractional self-adjoint initial value problem. We find a variation of constants formula for this fractional initial value problem, and use the variation of constants formula to derive the Green's function for a related boundary value problem. We study the Green's function and its properties in several settings. For a simplified boundary value problem, we show that the Green's function is nonnegative and we find its maximum and the maximum of its integral. For a boundary value problem with generalized boundary conditions, we find the Green's function and show that it is a generalization of the first Green's function. In the third chapter, we use the Contraction Mapping Theorem to prove existence and uniqueness of a positive solution to a forced self-adjoint fractional difference equation with a finite limit. We explore modifications to the forcing term and modifications to the space of functions in which the solution exists, and we provide examples to demonstrate the use of these theorems.

Advisers: Lynn Erbe and Allan Peterson


The Neural Ring: Using Algebraic Geometry To Analyze Neural Codes, Nora Youngs 2014 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The Neural Ring: Using Algebraic Geometry To Analyze Neural Codes, Nora Youngs

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research Papers in Mathematics

Neurons in the brain represent external stimuli via neural codes. These codes often arise from stimulus-response maps, associating to each neuron a convex receptive field. An important problem confronted by the brain is to infer properties of a represented stimulus space without knowledge of the receptive fields, using only the intrinsic structure of the neural code. How does the brain do this? To address this question, it is important to determine what stimulus space features can - in principle - be extracted from neural codes. This motivates us to define the neural ring and a related neural ideal, algebraic objects that encode ...


Reasoning & Proof In The Hs Common Core, Laurie O. Cavey 2014 Boise State University

Reasoning & Proof In The Hs Common Core, Laurie O. Cavey

Laurie O. Cavey

No abstract provided.


Near Oracle Performance And Block Analysis Of Signal Space Greedy Methods, Raja Giryes, Deanna Needell 2014 Claremont Colleges

Near Oracle Performance And Block Analysis Of Signal Space Greedy Methods, Raja Giryes, Deanna Needell

CMC Faculty Publications and Research

Compressive sampling (CoSa) is a new methodology which demonstrates that sparse signals can be recovered from a small number of linear measurements. Greedy algorithms like CoSaMP have been designed for this recovery, and variants of these methods have been adapted to the case where sparsity is with respect to some arbitrary dictionary rather than an orthonormal basis. In this work we present an analysis of the so-called Signal Space CoSaMP method when the measurements are corrupted with mean-zero white Gaussian noise. We establish near-oracle performance for recovery of signals sparse in some arbitrary dictionary. In addition, we analyze the block ...


The Physicist's Basement, Nora Culik 2014 Claremont Colleges

The Physicist's Basement, Nora Culik

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

No abstract provided.


The Discipline Of History And The “Modern Consensus In The Historiography Of Mathematics”, Michael N. Fried 2014 Claremont Colleges

The Discipline Of History And The “Modern Consensus In The Historiography Of Mathematics”, Michael N. Fried

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Teachers and students of mathematics often view history of mathematics as just mathematics as they know it, but in another form. This view is based on a misunderstanding of the nature of history of mathematics and the kind of knowledge it attempts to acquire. Unfortunately, it can also lead to a deep sense of disappointment with the history of mathematics itself, and, ultimately, a misunderstanding of the historical nature of mathematics. This kind of misunderstanding and the disappointment following from it--both raised to the level of resentment--run through the paper "A Critique of the Modern Consensus in the Historiography of ...


A Critique Of The Modern Consensus In The Historiography Of Mathematics, Viktor Blåsjö 2014 Claremont Colleges

A Critique Of The Modern Consensus In The Historiography Of Mathematics, Viktor Blåsjö

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

The history of mathematics is nowadays practiced primarily by professional historians rather than mathematicians, as was the norm a few decades ago. There is a strong consensus among these historians that the old-fashioned style of history is “obsolete,” and that “the gains in historical understanding are incomparably greater” in the more “historically sensitive” works of today. I maintain that this self-congratulatory attitude is ill-founded, and that the alleged superiority of modern historiographical standards ultimately rests on a dubious redefinition of the purpose of history rather than intrinsic merit.


Fields In Math And Farming, Susan D'Agostino 2014 Claremont Colleges

Fields In Math And Farming, Susan D'Agostino

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

A young woman’s search for a a contemplative, insightful experience leads her from farming to mathematics.


How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The Ways For Syllabic Variation In Certain Poetic Forms, Mike Pinter 2014 Claremont Colleges

How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The Ways For Syllabic Variation In Certain Poetic Forms, Mike Pinter

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

The Dekaaz poetic form, similar to haiku with its constrained syllable counts per line, invites a connection between poetry and mathematics. Determining the number of possible Dekaaz variations leads to some interesting counting observations. We discuss two different ways to count the number of possible Dekaaz variations, one using a binary framework and the other approaching the count as an occupancy problem. The counting methods described are generalized to also count variations of other poetic forms with syllable counts specified, including haiku. We include Dekaaz examples and suggest a method that can be used to randomly generate a Dekaaz variation.


Being Reasonable: Using Brainteasers To Develop Reasoning Ability In Humanistic Mathematics Courses, Gary Stogsdill 2014 Claremont Colleges

Being Reasonable: Using Brainteasers To Develop Reasoning Ability In Humanistic Mathematics Courses, Gary Stogsdill

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

Developing reasoning ability is often cited as one of the principal justifications of a mathematics requirement for liberal arts undergraduates. Humanistic math courses have become recognized as a paradigm for liberal arts mathematics, but such courses may not provide the opportunity to develop reasoning ability. The author describes his procedure for using brainteasers to promote reasoning in a humanistic math course for liberal arts undergraduates.


Joining ``The Mathematician's Delirium To The Poet's Logic'': Mathematical Literature And Literary Mathematics, Rita Capezzi, Christine Kinsey 2014 Claremont Colleges

Joining ``The Mathematician's Delirium To The Poet's Logic'': Mathematical Literature And Literary Mathematics, Rita Capezzi, Christine Kinsey

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

This paper describes our team-taught interdisciplinary mathematics and literature course, Mathematical Literature and Literary Mathematics, which invites students to consider Raymond Queneau's challenge: "Why shouldn't one demand a certain effort on the reader's part? Everything is always explained to him. He must eventually tire of being treated with such contempt.'' We study works by Berge, Borges, Calvino, Perec, Queneau, Robbe-Grillet and Stoppard, among others. From a literary critical perspective, the course highlights the play of language rather than the primacy of meaning. We choose texts where mathematical concepts are subjects or structuring elements of the literature, and ...


Some Effects Of The Human Genome Project On The Erdős Collaboration Graph, Chris Fields 2014 Claremont Colleges

Some Effects Of The Human Genome Project On The Erdős Collaboration Graph, Chris Fields

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

The Human Genome Project introduced large-scale collaborations involving dozens to hundreds of scientists into biology. It also created a pressing need to solve discrete mathematics problems involving tens of thousands of elements. In this paper, we use minimal path lengths in the Erdős Collaboration Graph between prominent individual researchers as a measure of the distance between disciplines, and we show that the Human Genome Project brought laboratory biology as a whole closer to mathematics. We also define a novel graph reduction method and a metric that emphasizes the robustness of collaborative connections between researchers; these can facilitate the analysis of ...


Review Of The Joy Of X: A Guided Tour Of Math, From One To Infinity By Steven Strogatz, Michael T. Catalano 2014 University of South Florida

Review Of The Joy Of X: A Guided Tour Of Math, From One To Infinity By Steven Strogatz, Michael T. Catalano

Numeracy

Strogatz, Steven. The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity, (New York, NY, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012). 316 pp. ISBN 978-0-547-51765-0

The Joy of x: A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity, by Steven Strogatz, is an engaging and example-filled argument for mathematics as a valuable and enjoyable activity. The thirty chapters are divided into six parts, entitled Numbers, Relationships, Shapes, Change, Data, and Frontiers. The discussion ranges from intuitive explanations of basic concepts such as place value, the four arithmetic operations, percentage increase and decrease, and solving equations, to “higher” levels of ...


How Does One Design Or Evaluate A Course In Quantitative Reasoning?, Bernard L. Madison 2014 University of South Florida

How Does One Design Or Evaluate A Course In Quantitative Reasoning?, Bernard L. Madison

Numeracy

In the absence of generally accepted content standards and with little evidence on the learning for long-term retrieval and transfer, how does one design or evaluate a course in quantitative reasoning (QR)? This is a report on one way to do so. The subject QR course, which has college algebra as a prerequisite and has been taught for 8 years, is being modified slightly to be offered as an alternative to college algebra. One modification is adding a significant formal writing component. As the modification occurs, the current course and the modified one are judged according to six sets of ...


What Is Higher Mathematics? Why Is It So Hard To Interpret? What Can Be Done?, John Tabak 2014 University of North Florida

What Is Higher Mathematics? Why Is It So Hard To Interpret? What Can Be Done?, John Tabak

Journal of Interpretation

Courses and seminars in higher mathematics are some of the most challenging assignments faced by academic interpreters. Difficulties interpreting higher mathematics can adversely impact the academic and professional aspirations of deaf mathematics students and professionals. This paper discusses the nature of higher mathematics with the goal of identifying what distinguishes higher mathematics from other subjects; it then reviews the history of attempts to sign/interpret higher mathematics with particular attention to current challenges associated with expressing higher mathematics in sign. The final part of the paper discusses strategies for more effectively expressing higher mathematics in American Sign Language.


Linear Convergence Of Stochastic Iterative Greedy Algorithms With Sparse Constraints, Nam Nguyen, Deanna Needell, Tina Woolf 2014 Claremont Colleges

Linear Convergence Of Stochastic Iterative Greedy Algorithms With Sparse Constraints, Nam Nguyen, Deanna Needell, Tina Woolf

CMC Faculty Publications and Research

Motivated by recent work on stochastic gradient descent methods, we develop two stochastic variants of greedy algorithms for possibly non-convex optimization problems with sparsity constraints. We prove linear convergence in expectation to the solution within a specified tolerance. This generalized framework applies to problems such as sparse signal recovery in compressed sensing, low-rank matrix recovery, and co-variance matrix estimation, giving methods with provable convergence guarantees that often outperform their deterministic counterparts. We also analyze the settings where gradients and projections can only be computed approximately, and prove the methods are robust to these approximations. We include many numerical experiments which ...


Automorphisms Of Cornoa Algebras, And Group Cohomology, Samuel Coskey, Ilijas Farah 2014 Boise State University

Automorphisms Of Cornoa Algebras, And Group Cohomology, Samuel Coskey, Ilijas Farah

Mathematics Faculty Publications and Presentations

In 2007 Phillips and Weaver showed that, assuming the Continuum Hypothesis, there exists an outer automorphism of the Calkin algebra. (The Calkin algebra is the algebra of bounded operators on a separable complex Hilbert space, modulo the compact operators.) In this paper we establish that the analogous conclusion holds for a broad family of quotient algebras. Specifically, we will show that assuming the Continuum Hypothesis, if A is a separable algebra which is either simple or stable, then the corona of A has nontrivial automorphisms. We also discuss a connection with cohomology theory, namely, that our proof can be viewed ...


Corrigendum To: Operator Monotone Functions And Löwner Functions Of Several Variables, Jim Agler, John E. McCarthy, Nicholas J. Young 2014 Washington University in St. Louis

Corrigendum To: Operator Monotone Functions And Löwner Functions Of Several Variables, Jim Agler, John E. Mccarthy, Nicholas J. Young

Faculty Publications

We fix a gap in the proof of Theorem 7.24 in Ann. of Math. 176 (2012), 1783–1826.


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