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Painting Outside Of The Lines: How Race Assignment Can Be Rethought Through Art, Giovanni Mella-Velazquez 2021 Emory University

Painting Outside Of The Lines: How Race Assignment Can Be Rethought Through Art, Giovanni Mella-Velazquez

Gettysburg Social Sciences Review

For centuries art has been used to make us think about our own human experiences. Unfortunately, works usually reflect the era which they were painted in; this has led to various artists showing, maintaining, and therefore reinforcing racist thoughts in our cultures. Art can be used to create a new narrative for our race assignments and their meanings. The idea of loving one's roots has been prevalent in many cultures, but in art form a disconnect between history and the everyday experience can arise which could miss the mark in helping us redefine our own race. Therefore, artwork which ...


Mammy And Aunt Jemima: Keeping The Old South Alive In Popular Visual Culture, Angela G. Athnasios 2021 Wayne State University

Mammy And Aunt Jemima: Keeping The Old South Alive In Popular Visual Culture, Angela G. Athnasios

Honors College Theses

Throughout the late nineteenth and twentieth century, American popular visual culture produced racist portrayals of Black Americans. Literature, illustrations, minstrelsy, film, and television are notorious for promoting such unflattering images. Each of these media typified African Americans as exaggerated caricatures with dark skin, bulging eyes, bright-red lips, and goofy smiles. The creators of these stereotypes project their racist beliefs into popular culture. This in turn heavily influences the way other races view people of African descent, as well as how Black people view themselves. From mammies, to Jezebels, to pickaninnies, and everything in between, the message ultimately conveyed in these ...


Dating Deborah Hall: A Portrait Reconsidered, Brian E. Hack 2021 CUNY Kingsborough Community College

Dating Deborah Hall: A Portrait Reconsidered, Brian E. Hack

Publications and Research

The elaborate, full-length portrait of Deborah Hall (1766, Brooklyn Museum) is one of the landmarks of Colonial portraiture, having earned its place in the canon for the pictorial innovations displayed by its creator, the enigmatic William Williams (1727-1791). The dominant narrative holds that Hall, the fifteen-year-old daughter of the Philadelphia printer David hall, tends her roses in an imaginary Garden of Love, surroundings Williams adapted from symbols of beauty and chastity found in emblem books of the period. The scholarly assumption is that the painting served to promote Deborah's marital suitability to potential suitors visiting the Hall residence. The ...


Of Homespun Opulence: An Analysis Of Jane Freilicher's Pastoral Abstraction In Parts Of A World, Grace Wolfe 2021 Portland State University

Of Homespun Opulence: An Analysis Of Jane Freilicher's Pastoral Abstraction In Parts Of A World, Grace Wolfe

Anthós

During a period of bold abstraction and American individuality, Jane Freilicher’s landscape and still-life paintings stand out for their figurative nature. Her use of color and tone to conjure the simple pleasure of life at home enrapture the viewer in a simultaneously universal yet personal experience. Upon closer inspection of her work, it becomes clear that although figurative in nature, Freilicher’s paintings abstract the pastoral to express identity in an urban environment. This essay examines Freilicher’s 1987 work, Parts of a World, in context with pastoral works throughout art history to understand the ways in which Freilicher ...


Understanding The Importance Of Statues: Symbols Of Racism In Modern Society, Theresa VanWormer 2021 St. John Fisher College

Understanding The Importance Of Statues: Symbols Of Racism In Modern Society, Theresa Vanwormer

The Review: A Journal of Undergraduate Student Research

Whether it is a monument, statue, plaque, or mural, the values and ideologies that are memorialized on public land reflect what reality the people of a country are choosing to remember. The United States’ political and racial history has led to the creation of controversial memorials, including memorials that honor the Confederacy and its leaders, influencing moral concepts based in racism, violence, and oppression. The continued veneration of these symbols on public land sends the message to the Black community that their oppressors are honored as heroes and that the society they live in still allows for their abuse. Annette-Gordon ...


Hagan, Brooklyn (Fa 1378), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2021 Western Kentucky University

Hagan, Brooklyn (Fa 1378), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text scan (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Folklife Archives Project 1378. “The Felts Log House: Past, Present and Future,” a paper written by WKU student Brooklyn Hagan about the Felts log house, a Logan County, Kentucky structure now situated on the campus of Western Kentucky University. The paper details the history of the house and its restoration. Includes comments from Andy Mills, interviewed by Hagan as he performed restoration work on the house.


Willoughby, Ginny (Fa 1379), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2021 Western Kentucky University

Willoughby, Ginny (Fa 1379), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text scan (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Folklife Archives Project 1379. “Restoration and Tradition: Andy Mills’ Work on the Felts Log House,” a paper written by WKU student Ginny Willoughby about the Felts log house, a Logan County, Kentucky structure now situated on the campus of Western Kentucky University. The paper details the history and design of the house and the process of its current restoration. Includes comments from Andy Mills, interviewed by Willoughby as he performed restoration work on the house.


The Stylistic Development Of Jean Despujols (1886-1965), Kelly M. Ward 2021 Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

The Stylistic Development Of Jean Despujols (1886-1965), Kelly M. Ward

LSU Master's Theses

This thesis is the first comprehensive scholarly analysis of the life and most extant works by Jean Despujols. The French and later naturalized American painter, writer, poet, philosopher, deep-thinker, and mystic was best known for his Neoclassical and academic style. This thesis briefly discusses the artist’s beginnings as a young painter at the School of Fine Arts in Bordeaux and in Paris, his sketches in the trenches of the First World War, his time at the Villa Medicis after winning the distinguished Rome Prize, and his paintings and thoughts as a philosopher and political writer throughout his life. An ...


The Adobe Frontier, Christopher J. Gauthier 2021 CUNY Hunter College

The Adobe Frontier, Christopher J. Gauthier

Theses and Dissertations

The Adobe Frontier is a documentary film about Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello—together known as “Studio Rael San Fratello” —and their work connecting contemporary technology with the legacy of pottery making and adobe architecture in the Southwest United States.


Kinstitution: A Topia Between Archive And Proposal, Christopher Lineberry 2021 CUNY Hunter College

Kinstitution: A Topia Between Archive And Proposal, Christopher Lineberry

Theses and Dissertations

Situating Topher Lineberry's work, this paper offers a primer on institutional critique, preliminary developments of "kinstitutional critique," and the cultivation of family-derived art history through the work of the artist's grandmother, Helen Lineberry. Feeding into a working understanding of family-and-kin-as-institution, the paper ultimately locates Topher Lineberry's work between relations to place, historical archives, and speculative proposals.


The Infinite Crisis: How The American Comic Book Has Been Shaped By War, Winston Andrus 2021 Chapman University

The Infinite Crisis: How The American Comic Book Has Been Shaped By War, Winston Andrus

War and Society (MA) Theses

This thesis project argues that war has been the greatest catalyst for the American comic book medium to become a socio-political change agent within western society. Comic books have become one of the most pervasive influences to global popular culture, with superheroes dominating nearly every popular art form. Yet, the academic world has often ignored the comic book medium as a niche market instead of integrated into the broader discussions on cultural production and conflict studies. This paper intends to bridge the gap between what has been classified as comic book studies and the greater academic world to demonstrate the ...


“Garden-Magic”: Conceptions Of Nature In Edith Wharton’S Fiction, Jonathan Malks 2021 William & Mary

“Garden-Magic”: Conceptions Of Nature In Edith Wharton’S Fiction, Jonathan Malks

Undergraduate Honors Theses

I situate Edith Wharton’s guiding idea of “garden-magic” at the center of my thesis because Wharton’s fiction shows how a garden space could naturalize otherwise inadmissible behaviors within upper-class society while helping a character tie such behavior to a greater possibility for escape. To this end, Wharton situates gardens as idealized touchstones within the built environment of New York City, spaces where characters believe they can reach self-actualization within a version of nature that is man-made. Actualization, in this sense, stems from a character’s imaginative escape that is enabled by a perception of the garden as a ...


The Line Of Dichotomy: Standpoints And Meaning In Anne Truitt's Art, Charles J. Parsons 2021 William & Mary

The Line Of Dichotomy: Standpoints And Meaning In Anne Truitt's Art, Charles J. Parsons

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Some of Anne Truitt’s formal strategies—such as using the separate faces of the work to force the viewer to engage in it sequentially—build or depend on real or literal facts of the “situation” of the artwork. If this is the case, how do such works escape being reducible to their objecthood, their literal properties of size and shape? And how do they produce effects that are not mere experience or mere affective response? The answer I offer is that they depend on conventions and interpretation.

Much of my analysis focuses on the ways Truitt makes her intentions ...


Benjamin West's Hybrid Identity: The Construction And Reconstruction Of An Anglo-American Artist, Caroline Strolic 2021 University of Maine - Main

Benjamin West's Hybrid Identity: The Construction And Reconstruction Of An Anglo-American Artist, Caroline Strolic

Honors College

How does one come to be known as the “father of American art,” especially after having never lived in an independent United States? The painter Benjamin West (1738-1820) is an enigma in the history of American art. Although he spent the majority of his life in London, where he worked to establish himself as the leader of the English school of painting, late in life he attempted to portray himself as a genuine American who played a major role in the development of American art. John Galt’s early biography of West, published in 1816, has proved to be instrumental ...


In-Between Spaces, Trinity Kai 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

In-Between Spaces, Trinity Kai

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

In-between Spaces is a paper based in personal narrative that uses Critical Race Theory and art to analyze the history of photography and systems of discrimination facilitated by hegemonic culture. Body is at the center as a symbol of the physical and psychological impacts systemic inequalities have on people that are classified as other and how one can be absent and present in institutional and public spaces.


"Epic Poems In Bronze": Confederate Memorialization And The Old South's Reckoning With Modernity In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries, Grace Ford-Dirks 2021 William & Mary

"Epic Poems In Bronze": Confederate Memorialization And The Old South's Reckoning With Modernity In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries, Grace Ford-Dirks

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Scholars of the American South generally end their studies of Confederate memorization just before World War 1. Because of a decline in the number of physical monuments and memorials to the Confederacy dedicated in the years immediately following the war, scholars appear to regard the interwar era as a period separate from the Lost Cause movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. However, to fully understand the complexity of developing Southern identities in the modern age, it is essential to expand traditional definitions of Confederate memorialization and the time period in which it is studied. This paper explores ...


Art And Aids: Viral Strategies For Visibility, Stephen Baylor Pillow 2021 University of Mississippi

Art And Aids: Viral Strategies For Visibility, Stephen Baylor Pillow

Honors Theses

“Art & AIDS: Viral Strategies for Visibility” examines the complex relationships between social stigma, healthcare, homophobia, and mortality, and how these impacted the lives of Western artists and manifested in their works. Most of the art discussed in this thesis was produced during the height of the AIDS crisis (late-1980s to mid-1990s). During this period, gay artists and their allies employed new strategies in their work to inspire activism, and convey intense emotions –– predominantly frustration, grief, and anxiety –– associated with HIV/AIDS. In the U.S., the inaction of the Reagan administration was largely due to widespread homophobia kindled by reinvigorated ...


Mapping Renewal: How An Unexpected Interdisciplinary Collaboration Transformed A Digital Humanities Project, Elise Tanner, Geoffrey Joseph 2021 UA Little Rock Center for Arkansas History and Culture

Mapping Renewal: How An Unexpected Interdisciplinary Collaboration Transformed A Digital Humanities Project, Elise Tanner, Geoffrey Joseph

Digital Initiatives Symposium

Funded by a National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Foundations Grant, the UA Little Rock Center for Arkansas History and Culture’s “Mapping Renewal” pilot project focused on creating access to and providing spatial context to archival materials related to racial segregation and urban renewal in the city of Little Rock, Arkansas, from 1954-1989. An unplanned interdisciplinary collaboration with the UA Little Rock Arkansas Economic Development Institute (AEDI) has proven to be an invaluable partnership. One team member from each department will demonstrate the Mapping Renewal website and discuss how the collaborative process has changed and ...


Program Booklet: 31st Annual James A. Porter Colloquium On African American Art And Art Of The African Diaspora, Howard University 2021 Howard University

Program Booklet: 31st Annual James A. Porter Colloquium On African American Art And Art Of The African Diaspora, Howard University

31st Annual James Porter Colloquium

Program Booklet: 31st Annual James A. Porter Colloquium on African American Art and Art of The African Diaspora is co-presented by Howard University’s Department of Art, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art and the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at University of Maryland, College Park. This year’s virtual program will explore the theme “Defining Diaspora: 21st Century Developments in Art of the African Diaspora.” Sessions will investigate the ways in which visual artists and ...


Intersections: Art And The Museum As Sites For Civic Dialogue, Nenette Luarca-Shoaf 2021 Lucas Museum of Narrative Art

Intersections: Art And The Museum As Sites For Civic Dialogue, Nenette Luarca-Shoaf

Art History Pedagogy & Practice

This essay describes the structure, pedagogy, and intent behind “Intersections,” a gallery program at the Art Institute of Chicago that occurred monthly between November 2016 and March 2020. The program, which continues less frequently and in a virtual format today, positions artworks as catalysts for helping people make sense of current events and timely issues. In doing so, it reframes adult learning in the museum as collaborative, dialogic, and open-ended, rather than setting up an experience that is primarily expert-driven and informational. Art historical methods such as visual analysis and consideration of primary source texts, along with collaborative learning activities ...


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