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Potential For Climate Induced Methane Hydrate Dissociation, Graham MacWilliams 2018 Pomona College

Potential For Climate Induced Methane Hydrate Dissociation, Graham Macwilliams

Pomona Senior Theses

Methane hydrates are frozen deposits of methane and water found in high pressure or low temperature sediments. When these deposits destabilize, large quantities of methane can be emitted into the atmosphere. This is significant to climate change because methane has 25 times more greenhouse gas potential than Carbon Dioxide. Worldwide, it is estimated there are between 2500 and 10000 gigatons of methane stored in hydrate deposits. This represents more carbon than all fossil fuels on Earth. It is estimated that between 200 and 2000 gigatons of methane are stored in hydrates in Arctic waters acutely vulnerable to greenhouse warming. Over ...


Living High And Healthy: Why Coloradans And Others Who Live At High Altitude Live Longer, And What Flatlanders Can Learn From Them, Todd Becker 2017 Getting Stronger blog

Living High And Healthy: Why Coloradans And Others Who Live At High Altitude Live Longer, And What Flatlanders Can Learn From Them, Todd Becker

Journal of Evolution and Health

No abstract provided.


The Case For The Long Body, Frank Forencich 2017 Exuberant Animal

The Case For The Long Body, Frank Forencich

Journal of Evolution and Health

No abstract provided.


P24. The Birds And The Beats: Perception Of A Beat In An Avian Model, Brendon Samuels 2017 Western University

P24. The Birds And The Beats: Perception Of A Beat In An Avian Model, Brendon Samuels

Western Research Forum

Background: Beat perception is a complex cognitive skill that enables humans to “feel” the beat in music, and is an essential component of synchronization of behavior and dance. The mechanisms in the human brain that facilitate beat perception are not entirely understood, and have only been studied thus far using non-invasive techniques. Some animals, such as songbirds, also seem to be able to detect a beat in rhythms, though this has never been formally tested independent of motor synchronization.

Methods: An operant experiment is used to assess if European starlings, a type of songbird, are capable of categorizing auditory rhythms ...


Beavers, Jimmy D. Taylor, Greg K. Yarrow, James E. Miller 2017 National Wildlife Research Center

Beavers, Jimmy D. Taylor, Greg K. Yarrow, James E. Miller

Wildlife Damage Management Technical Series

The American beaver (Castor canadensis) (Figure 1) is known as an “ecosystem engineer” because of the benefits their dams provide to biological diversity and ecosystem function. It also is considered a “keystone species” because of its ability to transform its environment, creating new habitats upon which other species depend. Despite the many positive benefits beavers provide through foraging and dam building, beavers also create conflict with people when their activities cause damage. The authors of this publication acknowledge and appreciate the many positive benefits that beavers provide; however, the focus of this publication is to provide basic information on beaver ...


The Effects Of Sex, Energy, And Environmental Conditions On The Movement Ecology Of Migratory Bats, Kristin A. Jonasson 2017 The University of Western Ontario

The Effects Of Sex, Energy, And Environmental Conditions On The Movement Ecology Of Migratory Bats, Kristin A. Jonasson

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Lack of knowledge about the behaviour of migratory species during the migratory period is a major barrier to conservation efforts. In this thesis I focus primarily on differences between the sexes of the bat Lasionycteris noctivagans, during spring migration. Females are pregnant during spring migration and this overlap between migration and reproduction may affect the time and energy management of females as compared to males. In Chapter 2 I examine spring migration phenology of bats at a stopover site. Females arrived earlier than males, likely to give their pups a long growing season. Fat stores appeared to reflect a strategy ...


A Sonic Net Excludes Birds From An Airfield: Implications For Reducing Bird Strike And Crop Losses, John P. Swaddle, Dana L. Moseley, Mark H. Hinders, Elizabeth P. Smith 2017 College of William and Mary

A Sonic Net Excludes Birds From An Airfield: Implications For Reducing Bird Strike And Crop Losses, John P. Swaddle, Dana L. Moseley, Mark H. Hinders, Elizabeth P. Smith

John Swaddle

Collisions between birds and aircraft cause billions of dollars of damages annually to civil, commercial, and military aviation. Yet technology to reduce bird strike is not generally effective, especially over longer time periods. Previous information from our lab indicated that filling an area with acoustic noise, which masks important communication channels for birds, can displace European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) from food sources. Here we deployed a spatially controlled noise (termed a “sonic net”), designed to overlap with the frequency range of bird vocalizations, at an airfield. By conducting point counts, we monitored the presence of birds for four weeks before ...


Mhc Class Iiβ Diversity As A Correlate Of Neutral-Locus Similarity And Diversity, And A Predictor Of Overwinter Return, In Song Sparrows (Melospiza Melodia), Matthew J. Watson 2017 The University of Western Ontario

Mhc Class Iiβ Diversity As A Correlate Of Neutral-Locus Similarity And Diversity, And A Predictor Of Overwinter Return, In Song Sparrows (Melospiza Melodia), Matthew J. Watson

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Abstract

The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a family of genes involved with recognizing pathogens and mounting an immune response. Parasite-mediated selection often favours heterozygosity at MHC because MHC-diverse individuals recognize a wider range of pathogens. Because migratory birds encounter many pathogens, I hypothesized that MHC diversity predicts overwinter and juvenile survivorship in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). I found no correlation between MHC diversity and neutral-locus (microsatellite) heterozygosity, suggesting that measures of neutral and adaptive genetic diversity provide complementary rather than redundant information. However, pairwise similarity at MHC predicted pairwise similarity at microsatellite loci. In contrast to my hypothesis, MHC ...


Effects Of Elephants On Vegetation Along A Fenceline Contrast In South Africa, Daniel Krieger, Sydney D. Gilmer 2017 Kent State University

Effects Of Elephants On Vegetation Along A Fenceline Contrast In South Africa, Daniel Krieger, Sydney D. Gilmer

Sydney Gilmer

Sydney Gilmer
Daniel Krieger
01/29/2017
Poster Abstract
 
Effects of elephants on vegetation along a fenceline contrast in South Africa
 
We assessed the degree of damage of two common plant species, marula Sclerocarya birrea and
the mountain aloe or flat-flowered aloe Aloe marlothii in two neighboring game reserves along a
fenceline with respect to the presence of African elephants Loxodonta africana. One of these
reserves, Thornybush, had 40-50 elephants while the other reserve, the Wits Rural facility,
contained no elephants, although elephants had broken into a select region briefly during a recent
drought. We measured the browse height of ...


Do Elephants Eat More Trees When Less Grass Is Available? A Field Study In Kruger National Park, South Africa., Emily Goldberg 2017 Yale

Do Elephants Eat More Trees When Less Grass Is Available? A Field Study In Kruger National Park, South Africa., Emily Goldberg

Yale Day of Data

Although African bush elephants are often responsible for the majority of herbivore-driven savanna tree mortality, confusion remains regarding the factors that influence their diet. Some elephants either browse or graze almost exclusively, while others balance the two, and the determinants of this variation remain poorly understood. I seek to determine whether grass availability controls the proportion of woody plants in elephant diet and, therefore, the amount of damage elephants do to trees while foraging. Preliminary analysis using already-available data on grass biomass, elephant density, and elephant damage to trees suggest that tree damage is in fact negatively correlated with grass ...


Sandhill And Whooping Cranes, Jeb Barzen, Ken Ballinger 2017 Private Lands Conservation, LLC

Sandhill And Whooping Cranes, Jeb Barzen, Ken Ballinger

Wildlife Damage Management Technical Series

As sandhill crane populations continue to grow in the United States, so too does crop damage, property damage to homeowners, and the risk of crane collisions with aircraft. Whooping crane populations also continue to grow, but with a global population of about 500 individuals (as of 2017), damage is rare and problems often require different solutions due to the species’ endangered status. The behavioral characteristics and habitat needs of sandhill and whooping cranes set the stage for conflict between these birds and people. Recognizing behavioral differences between territorial and non-territorial cranes greatly improves the effectiveness of any management effort.

Human-Wildlife ...


Wildlife At Airports, Travis L. DeVault, Bradley F. Blackwell, Jerrold L. Belant, Michael J. Begier 2017 USDA National Wildlife Research Center

Wildlife At Airports, Travis L. Devault, Bradley F. Blackwell, Jerrold L. Belant, Michael J. Begier

Wildlife Damage Management Technical Series

Collisions between aircraft and wildlife (wildlife strikes) are common occurrences across the developed world. Wildlife strikes are not only numerous, but also costly. Estimates suggest that wildlife strikes cost the civil aviation industry in the U.S. up to $625 million annually, and nearly 500 people have been killed in wildlife strikes worldwide. Most wildlife strikes occur in the airport environment: 72 percent of all strikes occur when the aircraft is ≤500 ft (152 m) above ground level, and 41 percent of strikes occur when the aircraft is on the ground during landing or takeoff. Thus, management efforts to reduce ...


Can Functional Traits Predict Plant Community Response To Global Change?, Sarah Kimball, Jennifer L. Funk, Marko J. Spasojevic, Katharine N. Suding, Scot Parker, Michael K. Goulden 2016 University of California - Irvine

Can Functional Traits Predict Plant Community Response To Global Change?, Sarah Kimball, Jennifer L. Funk, Marko J. Spasojevic, Katharine N. Suding, Scot Parker, Michael K. Goulden

Biology, Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences Faculty Articles and Research

One primary goal at the intersection of community ecology and global change biology is to identify functional traits that are useful for predicting plant community response to global change. We used observations of community composition from a long-term field experiment in two adjacent plant communities (grassland and coastal sage shrub) to investigate how nine key plant functional traits were related to altered water and nitrogen availability following fire. We asked whether the functional responses of species found in more than one community type were context dependent and whether community-weighted mean and functional diversity were significantly altered by water and nitrogen ...


Integrating Habitat Suitability Modeling And Radio Telemetry To Describe Habitat Use Of The Western Massasaugas, Sistrurus T. Tergeminus, In Texas, Mitchell R. Barazowski 2016 University of Texas at Tyler

Integrating Habitat Suitability Modeling And Radio Telemetry To Describe Habitat Use Of The Western Massasaugas, Sistrurus T. Tergeminus, In Texas, Mitchell R. Barazowski

Biology Theses

Habitat suitability modeling using the software package MaxEnt (Phillips, Anderson, & Schapire, 2006) is a popular method for describing the habitat of rare species. MaxEnt uses “presence only” data to develop models; however presence data are highly skewed towards areas of high detection probability and these areas may not represent the full range of habitat use. Thusly, predictions from models developed using only data from areas with high detection probability may not represent all suitable habitat. This study tested the ability of MaxEnt models developed using three different data sets to accurately describe Western Massasauga (Sistrurus t. tergeminus) habitat at a local scale. Models were evaluated by their ability to predict high suitability values at locations of known snake occurrence. The first ...


Zooarchaeology Of The Native American Sturgeon Fishery In Coastal Oregon, 350 Bc To Ad 1150, Elizabeth Dalyn Grindle 2016 University of Wyoming

Zooarchaeology Of The Native American Sturgeon Fishery In Coastal Oregon, 350 Bc To Ad 1150, Elizabeth Dalyn Grindle

Honors Theses AY 16/17

Sturgeons are not found often in the archaeological record due to their largely cartilaginous skeleton. What remains are the scutes, bony scale-like plates found on the outside of the body, and some diagnostic cranial features. Perhaps due to this, little is known about sturgeon or their anthropological uses in the past. Due to the size of a site excavated on the Oregon Coast, the collection contains an uncommon amount of archaeological sturgeon bones. The two sturgeon species on the Northwest coast, the green and white, have historically been heavily fished; resulting in a conservation concern for the fishery. As species ...


An Analysis Of Morphometric Differentiation In Lake And River Populations Of The Emerald Shiner, Notropis Atherinoides, John J.V. Lang 2016 Buffalo State College

An Analysis Of Morphometric Differentiation In Lake And River Populations Of The Emerald Shiner, Notropis Atherinoides, John J.V. Lang

Biology Theses

Understanding mechanisms that account for phenotypic variation has been of interest to biologists since the advent of Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection. It is now understood that adaptive divergence is a key driving force of intraspecific differentiation. Further, differences in habitat (e.g., flow regime, prey regime) have been shown to drive adaptive divergence in fish. For instance, fish inhabiting faster flowing water generally exhibit more fusiform bodies than their lake counterparts. Similarly, the partitioning of benthic and pelagic morphs generally results in smaller heads with the latter. This study used geometric shape analysis to assess morphological ...


Monk Parakeets, Michael L. Avery, James R. Lindsay 2016 National Wildlife Research Center

Monk Parakeets, Michael L. Avery, James R. Lindsay

Wildlife Damage Management Technical Series

Since their introduction to the United States in the 1960s, monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) have thrived (Figure 1). Until recently, annual Christmas Bird Count data have shown the population to be increasing exponentially. In the U.S., monk parakeets are an urban and suburban species with few natural predators, diseases or other factors limiting their population growth. They exploit backyard bird feeders and non-native ornamental plants for food. Monk parakeets often construct nests on man-made structures, such as electric utility facilities and cell phone towers. Because the birds build and maintain nests throughout the year, management of parakeet populations has ...


Using Cellular Automata To Model The Gun Violence Epidemic In Chicago, Il, Shelby Scott 2016 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Using Cellular Automata To Model The Gun Violence Epidemic In Chicago, Il, Shelby Scott

Annual Symposium on Biomathematics and Ecology: Education and Research

No abstract provided.


Vultures, Michael L. Avery, Martin S. Lowney 2016 USDA APHIS National Wildlife Research Center, Gainesville, FL

Vultures, Michael L. Avery, Martin S. Lowney

Wildlife Damage Management Technical Series

Black and turkey vultures cause problems in several ways. The most common problems associated with vultures are structural damage, loss of aesthetic value and property use related to offensive odors and appearance, depredation to livestock and pets, and air traffic safety. Management of these diverse problems often can be addressed by targeting the source of the birds causing the problem, namely the roost where the birds spend the night. Often the roost itself is the problem, such as when birds roost on a communication tower and foul the equipment with their feces or when they roost in a residential area ...


Cedar Waxwings, Michael L. Avery, Anthony G. Duffiney 2016 USDA National Wildlife Research Center

Cedar Waxwings, Michael L. Avery, Anthony G. Duffiney

Wildlife Damage Management Technical Series

Prevention and control of cedar waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) damage to small fruits such as blueberry, cherry, and strawberry is vexing to growers in many parts of the United States. Cedar waxwings (Figure 1) travel in flocks and descend in large numbers on berry crops, especially during winter and migration. In short feeding bouts, waxwings eat, peck, or knock substantial amounts of fruit from the plants. These frugivores are difficult to discourage once they become established at a given location. Harassment early and often using pyrotechnics or other sudden noisemakers can help prevent flocks from being established. The most effective preventative ...


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