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Investigating Genetic Differences Between Strains Of Janthinobacterium Lividum On Salamanders And In Their Environment, Rhiannon E. Black 2016 University of Tennessee - Knoxville

Investigating Genetic Differences Between Strains Of Janthinobacterium Lividum On Salamanders And In Their Environment, Rhiannon E. Black

University of Tennessee Honors Thesis Projects

No abstract provided.


The North American Grouse: Their Biology And Behavior, Paul A. Johnsgard 2016 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The North American Grouse: Their Biology And Behavior, Paul A. Johnsgard

Zea E-Books

The ten currently recognized species of grouse in North America have played an important role in America’s history, from the famous but ill-fated heath hen, a primary source of meat for the earliest New England immigrants, to the ruffed grouse, currently one of the most abundant and soughtafter upland game birds in more than 40 states and provinces. This book summarizes the ecology, reproductive biology, and social behavior of all ten of the extant North American grouse species. It also describes the current status of grouse populations, some of which are perilously close to extinction. The social behavior of ...


Initiation And Early Development Of Fiber In Wild And Cultivated Cotton, Kara M. Butterworth, Dean C. Adams, Harry T. Horner, Jonathan F. Wendel 2016 Iowa State University

Initiation And Early Development Of Fiber In Wild And Cultivated Cotton, Kara M. Butterworth, Dean C. Adams, Harry T. Horner, Jonathan F. Wendel

Harry Horner

Cultivated cotton fiber has undergone transformation from short, coarse fibers found in progenitor wild species to economically important, long, fine fibers grown globally. Morphological transformation requires understanding of development of wild fiber and developmental differences between wild and cultivated fiber.We examined early development of fibers, including abundance and placement on seed surface, nucleus position, presence of vacuoles, and fiber size and shape. Four species were studied using microscopic, morphometric, and statistical methods: Gossypium raimondii (wild D genome), Gossypium herbaceum (cultivated A genome), Gossypium hirsutum (wild tetraploid), and Gossypium hirsutum (cultivated tetraploid). Early fiber development is highly asynchronous in G ...


Neotype Designation For Scorpiops Pachmarhicus Bastawade, 1992 (Scorpiones: Euscorpiidae), With Redescription And Notes On The Species, Zeeshan A. Mirza, Gaurang Gowande 2016 Tata Institute of Fundamental Research

Neotype Designation For Scorpiops Pachmarhicus Bastawade, 1992 (Scorpiones: Euscorpiidae), With Redescription And Notes On The Species, Zeeshan A. Mirza, Gaurang Gowande

Euscorpius

Scorpiops pachmarhicus Bastawade, 1992 was described based on specimens collected from Pachmarhi, Madhya Pradesh. An expedition to the type locality led to discovery of a population at the type locality which permit us to designate a neotype for the species as types of the species are presently not traceable.


Phylogenetic Analysis Of Human Cytomegalovirus Pus27 And Pus28: Ascertaining An Independent Or Linked Evolutionary History, Jessica A. Scarborough 2016 University of San Francisco

Phylogenetic Analysis Of Human Cytomegalovirus Pus27 And Pus28: Ascertaining An Independent Or Linked Evolutionary History, Jessica A. Scarborough

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen that is particularly skilled at evading immune detection and defense mechanisms, largely due to extensive co-evolution with its host’s immune system. One aspect of this co-evolution involves the acquisition of four virally encoded GPCR chemokine receptor homologs, products of the US27, US28, UL33 and UL78 genes. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are the largest family of cell surface proteins, found in organisms from yeast to humans. In this research, phylogenetic analysis was used to investigate the origins of the US27 and US28 genes, which are adjacent in the viral genome. The results indicate ...


Rescuing Perishable Neuroanatomical Information From A Threatened Biodiversity Hotspot: Remote Field Methods For Brain Tissue Preservation Validated By Cytoarchitectonic Analysis, Immunohistochemistry, And X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography, Daniel F. Hughes, Ellen M. Walker, Paul M. Gignac, Anais Martinez, Kenichiro Negishi, Carl S. Lieb, Eli Greenbaum, Arshad M. Khan 2016 University of Texas at El Paso

Rescuing Perishable Neuroanatomical Information From A Threatened Biodiversity Hotspot: Remote Field Methods For Brain Tissue Preservation Validated By Cytoarchitectonic Analysis, Immunohistochemistry, And X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography, Daniel F. Hughes, Ellen M. Walker, Paul M. Gignac, Anais Martinez, Kenichiro Negishi, Carl S. Lieb, Eli Greenbaum, Arshad M. Khan

Arshad M. Khan, Ph.D.

Biodiversity hotspots, which harbor more endemic species than elsewhere on Earth, are
increasingly threatened. There is a need to accelerate collection efforts in these regions
before threatened or endangered species become extinct. The diverse geographical, ecological,
genetic, morphological, and behavioral data generated from the on-site collection of
an individual specimen are useful for many scientific purposes. However, traditional methods
for specimen preparation in the field do not permit researchers to retrieve neuroanatomical
data, disregarding potentially useful data for increasing our understanding of brain
diversity. These data have helped clarify brain evolution, deciphered relationships between
structure and function, and revealed constraints ...


Rescuing Perishable Neuroanatomical Information From A Threatened Biodiversity Hotspot: Remote Field Methods For Brain Tissue Preservation Validated By Cytoarchitectonic Analysis, Immunohistochemistry, And X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography, Daniel F. Hughes, Ellen M. Walker, Paul M. Gignac, Anais Martinez, Kenichiro Negishi, Carl S. Lieb, Eli Greenbaum, Arshad M. Khan 2016 University of Texas at El Paso

Rescuing Perishable Neuroanatomical Information From A Threatened Biodiversity Hotspot: Remote Field Methods For Brain Tissue Preservation Validated By Cytoarchitectonic Analysis, Immunohistochemistry, And X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography, Daniel F. Hughes, Ellen M. Walker, Paul M. Gignac, Anais Martinez, Kenichiro Negishi, Carl S. Lieb, Eli Greenbaum, Arshad M. Khan

Arshad M. Khan, Ph.D.

Biodiversity hotspots, which harbor more endemic species than elsewhere on Earth, are
increasingly threatened. There is a need to accelerate collection efforts in these regions
before threatened or endangered species become extinct. The diverse geographical, ecological,
genetic, morphological, and behavioral data generated from the on-site collection of
an individual specimen are useful for many scientific purposes. However, traditional methods
for specimen preparation in the field do not permit researchers to retrieve neuroanatomical
data, disregarding potentially useful data for increasing our understanding of brain
diversity. These data have helped clarify brain evolution, deciphered relationships between
structure and function, and revealed constraints ...


Fish Pain: An Inconvenient Truth, Culum Brown 2016 Macquarie University

Fish Pain: An Inconvenient Truth, Culum Brown

Culum Brown

Whether fish feel pain is a hot political topic. The consequences of our denial are huge given the billions of fish that are slaughtered annually for human consumption. The economic costs of changing our commercial fishery harvest practices are also likely to be great. Key outlines a structure-function analogy of pain in humans, tries to force that template on the rest of the vertebrate kingdom, and fails. His target article has so far elicited 34 commentaries from scientific experts from a broad range of disciplines; only three of these support his position. The broad consensus from the scientific community is ...


Comparative Evolutionary Approach To Pain Perception In Fishes, Culum Brown 2016 Macquarie University

Comparative Evolutionary Approach To Pain Perception In Fishes, Culum Brown

Culum Brown

Arguments against the fact that fish feel pain repeatedly appear even in the face of growing evidence that they do. The standards used to judge pain perception keep moving as the hurdles are repeatedly cleared by novel research findings. There is undoubtedly a vested commercial interest in proving that fish do not feel pain, so the topic has a half-life well past its due date. Key (2016) reiterates previous perspectives on this topic characterised by a black-or-white view that is based on the proposed role of the human cortex in pain perception. I argue that this is incongruent with our ...


The End-Permian Mass Extinction And The Siberian Traps Eruptions, Rebecca Teed 2016 Wright State University

The End-Permian Mass Extinction And The Siberian Traps Eruptions, Rebecca Teed

Rebecca Teed

This handout focuses on the evidence for the theory that a series of flood-basalt eruptions in Siberia caused the mass extinction at the end of the Permian Period.  This is the worst mass extinction known to geologists, and 90% or more of all species on Earth were wiped out.

It is part of a set of four articles on possible causes of the Permian and Cretaceous mass extinctions can be used to organize classroom debates or to have students compare and contrast the events and their causes.


The End-Permian Mass Extinction And A Possible Massive Impact, Rebecca Teed 2016 Wright State University

The End-Permian Mass Extinction And A Possible Massive Impact, Rebecca Teed

Rebecca Teed

This handout examines the evidence for the theory that a massive meteor impact caused the mass extinction at the end of the Permian Period.  This is the worst mass extinction known to geologists, and 90% or more of all species on Earth were wiped out.

It is part of a set of four articles on possible causes of the Permian and Cretaceous mass extinctions can be used to organize classroom debates or to have students compare and contrast the events and their causes.


The End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction And The Chicxulub Impact, Rebecca Teed 2016 Wright State University

The End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction And The Chicxulub Impact, Rebecca Teed

Rebecca Teed

This handout focuses on the evidence for the theory that massive meteor impact off the coast of Mexico caused the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period.  The dinosaurs and about 75% of all marine invertebrate species and many other organisms died abruptly at this time.

It is part of a set of four articles on possible causes of the Permian and Cretaceous mass extinctions can be used to organize classroom debates or to have students compare and contrast the events and their causes.


The End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction And The Deccan Traps Eruptions, Rebecca Teed 2016 Wright State University

The End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction And The Deccan Traps Eruptions, Rebecca Teed

Rebecca Teed

This handout focuses on the evidence for the theory that a series of flood-basalt eruptions in northern India caused the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period. The dinosaurs and about 75% of all marine invertebrate species and many other organisms died abruptly at this time.

This is one of a set of four articles on possible causes of the Permian and Cretaceous mass extinctions can be used to organize classroom debates or to have students compare and contrast the events and their causes.


The End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction And The Chicxulub Impact, Rebecca Teed 2016 Wright State University - Main Campus

The End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction And The Chicxulub Impact, Rebecca Teed

Earth and Environmental Sciences Faculty Publications

This handout focuses on the evidence for the theory that a massive meteor impact off the coast of Mexico caused the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period. The dinosaurs and about 75% of all marine invertebrate species and many other organisms died abruptly at this time. It is part of a set of four articles on possible causes of the Permian and Cretaceous mass extinctions that can be used to organize classroom debates or to have students compare and contrast the events and their causes.


The End-Permian Mass Extinction And The Siberian Traps Eruptions, Rebecca Teed 2016 Wright State University - Main Campus

The End-Permian Mass Extinction And The Siberian Traps Eruptions, Rebecca Teed

Earth and Environmental Sciences Faculty Publications

This handout focuses on the evidence for the theory that a series of flood-basalt eruptions in Siberia caused the mass extinction at the end of the Permian Period. This is the worst mass extinction known to geologists, and 90% or more of all species on Earth were wiped out. It is part of a set of four articles on possible causes of the Permian and Cretaceous mass extinctions that can be used to organize classroom debates or to have students compare and contrast the events and their causes.


The End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction And The Deccan Traps Eruptions, Rebecca Teed 2016 Wright State University - Main Campus

The End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction And The Deccan Traps Eruptions, Rebecca Teed

Earth and Environmental Sciences Faculty Publications

This handout focuses on the evidence for the theory that a series of flood-basalt eruptions in northern India caused the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period. The dinosaurs and about 75% of all marine invertebrate species and many other organisms died abruptly at this time. This is one of a set of four articles on possible causes of the Permian and Cretaceous mass extinctions that can be used to organize classroom debates or to have students compare and contrast the events and their causes.


The End-Permian Mass Extinction And A Possible Massive Impact, Rebecca Teed 2016 Wright State University - Main Campus

The End-Permian Mass Extinction And A Possible Massive Impact, Rebecca Teed

Earth and Environmental Sciences Faculty Publications

This handout examines the evidence for the theory that a massive meteor impact caused the mass extinction at the end of the Permian Period. This is the worst mass extinction known to geologists, and 90% or more of all species on Earth were wiped out. It is part of a set of four articles on possible causes of the Permian and Cretaceous mass extinctions that can be used to organize classroom debates or to have students compare and contrast the events and their causes.


Estimating The Frequency Of Sexual Reproduction In The Diatom Stephanodiscus Niagarae, Ann W. Dickens 2016 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Estimating The Frequency Of Sexual Reproduction In The Diatom Stephanodiscus Niagarae, Ann W. Dickens

Biological Sciences Undergraduate Honors Theses

Diatoms are single-celled micro-algae with cell walls composed of silica, that reproduce in a way that results in a decrease in cell size after each round of mitotic (asexual) division. A cell cannot continue to shrink indefinitely, so when the average size of the population reaches a critical threshold, diatoms reproduce sexually and restore their maximal size. It is unclear, however, how frequently diatoms undergo sexual reproduction in nature. As a proxy for sexual reproduction, I monitored changes in cell size of a population of the diatom Stephanodiscus niagarae from the plankton community of Lake Fayetteville (Arkansas, USA). Weekly sampling ...


Through Genera And Generations:A Systematic Study Of Elasmobranch-Hosted Cestodes Of The Indo-Pacific, With Comments On Phylogenetic Relationships, Alison Koontz 2016 University of Connecticut - Storrs

Through Genera And Generations:A Systematic Study Of Elasmobranch-Hosted Cestodes Of The Indo-Pacific, With Comments On Phylogenetic Relationships, Alison Koontz

University Scholar Projects

Collection of new material from the bamboosharks Chiloscyllium indicum Gmelin, 1789 and Chiloscyllium hasseltii Bleeker, 1852 from Indonesian and Malaysian Borneo prompted reevaluation of the identity and host associations of the cestode genus Carpobothrium Shipley & Hornell, 1906. Light microscopical examination of whole mounts, histological sections, and egg preparations, in combination with scanning electron microscopy of scoleces, led to redescription of the type species Carpobothrium chiloscyllii Shipley and Hornell, 1906 from C. indicum, as well as description of a new species from C. hasseltii. Examination of some of Southwell’s material identified as C. chiloscyllii from the batoid hosts Urogymnus asperrimus ...


Virus-Host Co-Evolution: Determining The Origin Of Human Cytomegalovirus Us27 And Us28, Jessica A. Scarborough, Juliet Spencer, John Paul 2016 University of San Francisco

Virus-Host Co-Evolution: Determining The Origin Of Human Cytomegalovirus Us27 And Us28, Jessica A. Scarborough, Juliet Spencer, John Paul

Creative Activity and Research Day - CARD

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are the largest family of cell surface proteins, found in organisms from yeast to humans. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen that is particularly skilled at evading immune detection and defense mechanisms, largely due to extensive co-evolution with its host’s immune system. One aspect of this co-evolution involves the acquisition of four virally encoded GPCR homologs: US27, US28, UL33 and UL78. In this research, phylogenetic analysis was used to investigate the origins of the US27 and US28 genes, which are adjacent in the viral genome. The results indicate that both US27 and US28 share ...


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