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[Note From The Editor], Frederick J. Spencer Jan 1981

[Note From The Editor], Frederick J. Spencer

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The MCV Quarterly ceases publication with this issue. No journal of this type can be self-supporting and we bow to the inevitable reality of inflation. The idea of the Quarterly came from Sami Said. Almost single handed he cajoled and coerced the Dean of the School of Medicine into finding the money for publication. Throughout its existence MCV/Q has remained true to its stated purpose of disseminating “scientific information from all sources”, resisting several attempts to convert it into a “house journal” or popular newssheet. In essence, it has been the printed pivot of continuing education in the medical ...


Medicine In Retrospect Jan 1981

Medicine In Retrospect

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The following is a transcript of an informal talk by Drs. Kinloch Nelson and Charles M. Caravati, presented in 1974 to the School of Medicine of the Medical College of Virginia, Health Sciences Division of Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.


Recent Advances In Cancer Chemotherapy, Robert B. Diasio Jan 1981

Recent Advances In Cancer Chemotherapy, Robert B. Diasio

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The present state of cancer chemotherapy can be reviewed in light of selected basic principles with an acknowledgement of the role of established chemotherapeutic agents. Four chemotherapeutic agents recently approved for clinical use and their impact when used in combination regimens should be examined. Several important concepts influencing chemotherapy in the 1980s include the use of chemotherapy in the adjuvant setting, the use of hormonal receptor data in planning therapy, and the use of in vitro tests on tumor specimens to predict tumor sensitivity to cancer chemotherapy drugs (prior to administration of these potentially toxic drugs to a particular patient ...


Changing Concepts Of Cancer Biology, Diagnosis And Treatment, Robert N. Taub Jan 1981

Changing Concepts Of Cancer Biology, Diagnosis And Treatment, Robert N. Taub

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Cancer is the number two killer in the United State and will probably account for some 400,000 deaths in 1982. The lung has now achieved the dubious distinction of being the most common site of cancer in men and causes the most deaths. Cancer of the colon and rectum is the second most common cancer in both males and females combined, whereas carcinoma of the breast and uterus predominate in women.


Recent Advances In Gastorintestinal Cancer, Galen L. Wampler Jan 1981

Recent Advances In Gastorintestinal Cancer, Galen L. Wampler

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Colorectal carcinoma accounts for the majority of all gastrointestinal cancers and is the second leading site of cancer, excluding skin cancers, in overall incidence in the United States. Cancer of the stomach, although decreasing in frequency is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, data from large numbers of patients such as can be found in Cancer Patient Survival Report No. 5 show only very modest increases in survival for patients with these diseases in recent years.


Tapping The Tube, Sara Kaltreider Jan 1981

Tapping The Tube, Sara Kaltreider

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Before percussion and mediate auscultation were discovered, methods of physical examination – in particular chest examination – were limited. Only observation was used with any regularity. From the time of Hippocrates, palpation and direct auscultation had been used sporadically to detect heartbeats but had not proved to be of practical value because clinicopathological correlation had not yet been established. At last, when a new method called percussion was conceived by Auenbrugger in 1761, it was ignored for almost forty years. Not until the French School evolved did percussion become established, largely through Corvisart, Napoleon’s private physician. Coincident with the revival of ...


Volume Sixteen Subject Index Jan 1981

Volume Sixteen Subject Index

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Subject Index for MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly, 1981, Volume Sixteen.


Volume Sixteen Author Index Jan 1981

Volume Sixteen Author Index

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Author Index for MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly, 1981, Volume Sixteen.


The Gay Nineties: Oscar Wilde Reconsidered, Frederick J. Spencer Jan 1981

The Gay Nineties: Oscar Wilde Reconsidered, Frederick J. Spencer

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Sex and hypocrisy have always been bedmates, but never more than in Victorian England. In the “Gay Nineties” promiscuity was widely accepted in all social classes, although the aristocracy hid its lust behind a strict code of propriety. Country house parties catered to infidelities with the approval of the Prince of Wales, himself a notorious womanizer.


Contents Jan 1981

Contents

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Table of contents for MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly, 1981, Volume Sixteen, Numbers Three and Four.


Breast Cancer: An Update, Wade K. Smith Jan 1981

Breast Cancer: An Update, Wade K. Smith

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Breast cancer comprises approximately 13.9% of all cases of malignancy in both sexes and 19% in women, in whom it is the commonest form of cancer. The American Cancer Society estimates that 110,000 women developed breast cancer in 1981, and some 37,100 deaths from the disease occurred. The five-year survival rate has been improving over the past 40 years as shown in Table 1, but patients remain in risk of recurrence indefinitely and survival for ten years is generally accepted as the minimal time period necessary to establish the validity of new therapies.


Colonial Cultivation And Concoctions, Sara Jones Gomberg Jan 1981

Colonial Cultivation And Concoctions, Sara Jones Gomberg

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Have you ever wondered how to increase the value of your property? One way would be to include a well-cultivated herb garden, that is if you were a seventeenth-century colonist. Not only were the herbs much sought after for their culinary uses but also for their medicinal properties. Today’s medical library may not include a collection of botany books, yet botanical knowledge was a large part of early medical training and the mainstay of the “cavalier concoctions” used by colonists for medical treatment.


Mcv/Q, Medical College Of Virginia Quarterly, Vol. 15 No. 3 Jan 1981

Mcv/Q, Medical College Of Virginia Quarterly, Vol. 15 No. 3

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Mcv/Q, Medical College Of Virginia Quarterly, Vol. 16 No. 1 Jan 1980

Mcv/Q, Medical College Of Virginia Quarterly, Vol. 16 No. 1

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Endometriosis, W. Glenn Hurt, Ray A. Wetheim Jan 1980

Endometriosis, W. Glenn Hurt, Ray A. Wetheim

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Endometriosis is diagnosed when tissue which resembles the endometrial lining exists outside the endometrial cavity. Although first described as a pathological entity in the late 1800s, the term “endometriosis” was not introduced until the early 1920s by Sampson. The great volume of literature which has accumulated on this topic is, by and large, a product of the 20th century.


Cervical Cytology And Colposcopy, W. Glenn Hurt Jan 1980

Cervical Cytology And Colposcopy, W. Glenn Hurt

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Colposcopy was first described by Hinselmann of Hamburg in 1925. The colposcope is a binocular microscope of low power (10x to 25x) which contains a light source and is mounted on a stand to permit its use in the study of the surface of the uterine cervix. Using the colposcope, the physician can identify and evaluate cervical epithelial abnormalities.


Office Endometrial Sampling, Stephen A. Cohen, W. Glenn Hurt Jan 1980

Office Endometrial Sampling, Stephen A. Cohen, W. Glenn Hurt

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The concept of office endometrial sampling is not new. Kelly recommended its use in 1925. More recently, the procedure has received increased attention as physicians and the public have sought ways to curb the spiraling cost of medical care. Uterine curettage is the operation most commonly performed on women throughout the world. As an inpatient procedure, it costs $500 to $600. The same procedure performed in an outpatient surgical center costs $350 to $400. In over 90% of cases, an adequate endometrial sample may be obtained in the office at a cost of $50 to $60. For office endometrial sampling ...


Evaluation And Management Of Adnexal Masses, Dean R. Goplerud Jan 1980

Evaluation And Management Of Adnexal Masses, Dean R. Goplerud

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The adnexa are those structures which lie along the uterus, the most important of which are the tubes and ovaries. The portions of the broad ligaments and mesosalpinx which contain embryonic remnant may also, at times, be palpable and therefore must be considered in any differential diagnosis.


Introduction, W. Glenn Hurt Jan 1980

Introduction, W. Glenn Hurt

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology welcomed the opportunity to present the 51st Annual McGuire Lecture Series. The lectures were designed to provide the primary care physician with information which is clinically useful and applicable to the daily practice of obstetrics and gynecology. An effort was made to achieve a balance between those health problems that have been known for some time but whose understanding has changed and those problems that have been recognized more recently and whose solutions are still evolving.


Antenatal Genetic Studies, Fay Redwine Jan 1980

Antenatal Genetic Studies, Fay Redwine

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The Antenatal Genetic Testing Program at MCV began in 1973. The standard scheme for antenatal genetic testing involves counseling, the methods of carrier detection available, ultrasound, amniocentesis, and laboratory evaluation. Patients are referred because of a family or personal history of a genetic abnormality or because they have been evaluated in a carrier detection program like those for Tay-Sachs disease or Sickle Cell disease and are known carriers. After referral, patients are given genetic counseling by me and members of the Department of Human Genetics; if antenatal genetic testing is deemed appropriate, we obtain informed consent and proceed with an ...


Identification Of The High-Risk Gravida, Robert E. Petres, Emily M. Coogan Jan 1980

Identification Of The High-Risk Gravida, Robert E. Petres, Emily M. Coogan

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

In the past, there has been considerable pessimism about our ability to identify the pregnant patient at risk. However, with the development of sophisticated diagnostic techniques these patients can be identified and with appropriate treatment their outcome can be improved. This paper presents the overall benefit of categorizing obstetrical patients, the method that has been developed at the Medical College of Virginia (MCV), and certain categories of high-risk obstetrical patients who continue to present problems and have unacceptably high complication rates.


Management Of High-Risk Gravida, Shelby Jarrell Jan 1980

Management Of High-Risk Gravida, Shelby Jarrell

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Comprehensive prenatal care has become the hallmark of modern obstetrical practice. Awareness by both physicians and patients that such care is necessary for satisfactory perinatal outcome has led to the establishment of an obstetrical subspecialty, Maternal Fetal Medicine, to provide a higher level of prenatal care and to increase our knowledge of perinatal events. Many of the management techniques currently being used for high-risk pregnancies can be readily applied to the routine obstetrical population. The additional physician time and laboratory tests required are minimal, and the early identification and prevention of perinatal complications will eliminate the need for “crisis” medicine.


Relaxation Of The Supporting Structures Of The Female Pelvis, David H. Nichols Jan 1980

Relaxation Of The Supporting Structures Of The Female Pelvis, David H. Nichols

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The purpose of this discussion is to share with you some thoughts about pelvic relaxation, its mysteries, some technical minutiae helpful in identifying them and some of the surgical problems involved. Thus, by looking at a number of these diagnostic challenges, you may be stimulated to some diagnostic thinking in an office setting.


Menstrual Abnormalities, Leo J. Dunn Jan 1980

Menstrual Abnormalities, Leo J. Dunn

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Any physician involved in primary care will encounter patients with menstrual dysfunction. Mismanagement of this disorder is not usually the result of its complexity but rather the lack of an orderly approach. In unusual circumstances one may encounter a patient with a menstrual disorder of sufficient complexity to require referral. This decision should be based on a work-up indicating such a need rather than frustration after unsuccessful empiric therapeutic trials.


Contraception Versus Sterilization, Thampu Kumarasamy Jan 1980

Contraception Versus Sterilization, Thampu Kumarasamy

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The World Health Organization reported that 40% of the pregnancies in the world in 1977 were unplanned and 20% were unwanted; in the United States in 1978 there were 1,300,000 teenage pregnancies, of which one million ended in abortions. To prevent these unwanted pregnancies and also to abolish the cost in terms of money, time and lives, conception control is very important. Contraception is as old as the human race. In ancient times Chinese women swallowed live tadpoles three days after their menses for this purpose. North African women mixed gunpowder solution and foam from a camel’s ...


Urinary Incontinence In Women, J. Andrew Fantl Jan 1980

Urinary Incontinence In Women, J. Andrew Fantl

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The adult bladder and urethra acting as a unit allow for the voluntary dual function of urine collection and evacuation. Urinary continence is an acquired, “learned” state, and normal anatomy and function of the nervous and genitourinary systems are necessary to maintain it. Urinary incontinence is defined as “a condition where involuntary loss of urine is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable.” This definition takes into account both sociocultural aspects and the need for objective clinical assessment of urinary leakage. Marked individual variations in physical activity, occupation and hygienic standards call for appropriate clinical judgment when evaluation ...


Mcv/Q, Medical College Of Virginia Quarterly, Vol. 15 No. 4 Jan 1980

Mcv/Q, Medical College Of Virginia Quarterly, Vol. 15 No. 4

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Contents Jan 1980

Contents

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Table of contents for MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly, 1980, Volume Sixteen, Numbers One and Two.


Some Psychological Aspects Of Dealing With Cancer, Joel J. Silverman Jan 1980

Some Psychological Aspects Of Dealing With Cancer, Joel J. Silverman

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

Cancer has a potentially profound affect upon the emotional and physical life of the patient and his or her family. For most people the word “cancer” has a fearsome connotation. This discussion explores the areas of self-image, body-image, and personal relationships that are often altered in cancer patients, as well as the emotional and cognitive states which can result from malignancy and its treatment. We will also review some techniques for helping the patient. It is important to remember that the psychological responses to any illness are individual and largely determined by the patient’s past experience, psychological strengths, weaknesses ...


Introduction, David W. Richardson Jan 1979

Introduction, David W. Richardson

MCV/Q, Medical College of Virginia Quarterly

The 50th McGuire Lecture Series presented current reviews in clinical cardiology and hypertension for practicing physicians and medical students. Speakers were members of the faculty of the Divisions of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery at the Medical College of Virginia and Dean T. Mason, M.D., Chief of the Cardiovascular Section at the University of California at Davis. Dr. Mason, who is the outstanding authority on the management of congestive heart failure by reduction of the load against which the heart must pump, was the McGuire Lecturer.