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Benjamin Smith Lyman: Geologist At The Intersection Of Hokkaido, Japan, And The United States, Benjamin Ashby Oct 2021

Benjamin Smith Lyman: Geologist At The Intersection Of Hokkaido, Japan, And The United States, Benjamin Ashby

Masters Theses

Benjamin Smith Lyman was a geologist from Northampton, Massachusetts, who was contracted by the Japanese government in 1872 to carry out coal surveys on the island of Hokkaidō 北海道. What started out as a standard geological survey, quickly evolved into a lifelong interest in Japan for Lyman. The large collection of letters, books, photographs, and other documents housed under the Benjamin Smith Lyman Collection at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, serve as a primary source on both early relations between the Japanese and the West and the beginnings of the large network of academic writings which today can be classified ...


The Survival Of Dulles: Reflections On A Second Century Of Influence, Michael M. Canaris Aug 2021

The Survival Of Dulles: Reflections On A Second Century Of Influence, Michael M. Canaris

Religion

This collection, marking the centenary of Avery Dulles’s birth, makes an entirely distinctive contribution to contemporary theological discourse as we approach the second century of the cardinal’s influence, and the twenty-first of Christian witness in the world. Moving beyond a festschrift, the volume offers both historical analyses of Dulles’s contributions and applications of his insights and methodologies to current issues like immigration, exclusion, and digital culture. It includes essays by Dulles’s students, colleagues, and peers, as well as by emerging scholars who have been and continue to be indebted to his theological vision and encyclopedic fluency ...


“Our Antient Friends . . . Are Much Reduced”: Mary And James Wright, The Hopewell Friends Meeting, And Quaker Women In The Southern Backcountry, C. 1720–C. 1790, Thomas Daniel Knight Aug 2021

“Our Antient Friends . . . Are Much Reduced”: Mary And James Wright, The Hopewell Friends Meeting, And Quaker Women In The Southern Backcountry, C. 1720–C. 1790, Thomas Daniel Knight

History Faculty Publications and Presentations

Although the existence of Quakers in Virginia is well known, the best recent surveys of Virginia history devote only passing attention to them, mostly in the context of expanding religious freedoms during the revolutionary era. Few discuss the Quakers themselves or the nature of Quaker settlements although notably, Warren Hofstra, Larry Gragg, and others have studied aspects of the Backcountry Quaker experience. Recent Quaker historiography has reinterpreted the origins of the Quaker faith and the role of key individuals in the movement, including the roles of Quaker women. Numerous studies address Quaker women collectively. Few, however, examine individual families or ...


Hamilton Disston's St. Cloud Sugar Plantation, 1887-1901, Pat Dodson Jul 2021

Hamilton Disston's St. Cloud Sugar Plantation, 1887-1901, Pat Dodson

Florida Historical Quarterly

Florida history remembers Henry Bradley Plant and Henry Morrison Flagler because of the railroads and hotels that these two nineteenth century magnates built and because of the major impact that they had on state politics and on Florida’s economic growth. But Hamilton Disston of Philadelphia preceded them, and in fact, helped make their ventures possible. Disston’s own accomplishments may have had a greater influence than either Plant or Flagler in leading Florida into the twentieth century. A member of the prominent Pennsylvania saw-manufacturing family, D&ton was first attracted to Florida in the 1870s by the lunker black ...


Social Reconstruction: American Catholics Radical Response To The Social Gospel Movement And Progressives., Paul Lubienecki, Phd Jul 2021

Social Reconstruction: American Catholics Radical Response To The Social Gospel Movement And Progressives., Paul Lubienecki, Phd

Journal of Catholic Education

At the fin de siècle the Industrial Revolution created egregious physical, emotional and spiritual conditions for American society and especially for the worker but who would come forward to alleviate those conditions? Protestants implemented their Social Gospel Movement as a proposed cure to these problems. Secular Progressives engaged in a more activist role both materially and through legislation. Both of these groups had limited successes with disappointing outcomes. America’s Catholics, more accustomed to living and working in industrialized neighborhoods, eventually developed their own programs and agenda to address social and labor concerns. However some scholars believed that Catholic efforts ...


“Inherently Tender And Prone To Crisis:” U.S.-Israeli Relations, 1974-1989, Sean Scanlon Jul 2021

“Inherently Tender And Prone To Crisis:” U.S.-Israeli Relations, 1974-1989, Sean Scanlon

Dissertations, Theses, & Student Research, Department of History

This dissertation demonstrates how the relationship between the United States and the State of Israel underwent a significant transformation during 1970s and 1980s. After more than two decades of limited American aid since Israel declared its independence in 1948, the United States under Presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan dramatically increased its support for Israel in the wake of the October War of 1973. This increased level of support is most apparent in the level of U.S. military aid provided to Israel, which Israel received under extremely favorable terms. The deepening of U.S.-Israeli ...


‘A Deadly Menace To All Young Womankind’: Seduction And Protective Legislation In America, 1850-1923, Elissa Michelle Isenberg May 2021

‘A Deadly Menace To All Young Womankind’: Seduction And Protective Legislation In America, 1850-1923, Elissa Michelle Isenberg

Dissertations - ALL

“A Deadly Menace to All Young Womankind”: Seduction and Protective Legislation in America, 1850-1923 looks at sexual harassment before it was an actionable offense. Although female domestic servants have endured unwanted sexual attention for most of American history, the entry of women into wage labor in factories and offices during the late nineteenth century dramatically increased the number of girls and women that were subjected to what we today call harassment. Careful examination of American newspaper archives, court records, and reformers’ personal papers have uncovered cases of unsolicited sexual advances toward women, and have demonstrated that sexual harassment was considered ...


Marketing Race In British History: An Analysis Of The British Empire Marketing Board Posters (1926-1933), Jules Matthew Maffei May 2021

Marketing Race In British History: An Analysis Of The British Empire Marketing Board Posters (1926-1933), Jules Matthew Maffei

Theses and Dissertations

Contemporary instances of racially charged product imagery are deeply intertwined with history. Products like "Aunt Jemima", "Uncle Ben's Rice", or the indigenous peoples portrayed on "Land O' Lakes" butter affects perception of race, class, and gender. The continued existence of these controversially branded products helps to construct attitudes about these subjects and demonstrates a societal acceptance of these as norms. The British Empire Marketing Board (EMB) represents an important historical example of the production of such racialized values. Between 1926 and 1933, the EMB created and disseminated marketing materials to promote intra-Empire trade. While the EMB was generally considered ...


Session 1: Panel 2: Presenter 2 (Paper) -- The Irish Language And Nationalism In The 20th Century, Charlotte Cody May 2021

Session 1: Panel 2: Presenter 2 (Paper) -- The Irish Language And Nationalism In The 20th Century, Charlotte Cody

Young Historians Conference

Under centuries of British colonial rule, mass emigration, and discriminatory laws, the Irish language took a secondary position to English. As Irish nationalist ideology gained momentum in the early 20th century, Irish became useful and popular as a powerful symbol of resilience and a discrete national identity. However, the significance of Irish to nationalism had a mixed impact on its perception across the island due to the violence and sectarianism that accompanied the struggle for independence. This paper explores the influence that this divisive history had and continues to exert on the perception of and legislation supporting the Irish language ...


Contract Labor In Florida During Reconstruction, Edward K. Eckert May 2021

Contract Labor In Florida During Reconstruction, Edward K. Eckert

Florida Historical Quarterly

Until relatively recent times the historiography of the Reconstruction period in Florida could be summed up by Claude G. Bowers’ three-word paragraph, “Florida was putrid.” Legislatures full of swindlers, “railroad steals,” “shabby strangers,” and “old black mammies,” praising God and voting Republican, were all a part of the traditional image of this so-called dark era of United States history. Revisionist historians such as Howard K. Beale, David Donald, Kenneth Stampp, and Rembert W. Patrick have challenged this view. They describe the years after the Civil War as a progressive age for the South when civil, educational, and economic reforms brought ...


Contents Of Volume Xlvii, Florida Historical Society May 2021

Contents Of Volume Xlvii, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Contains a list of articles and authors for Vol. 46


"Learning By Doing, By Wondering, By Figuring Things Out:" A New Look At Contemporary Homeschooling And Pedagogical Progressivism, Jacques Klapisch May 2021

"Learning By Doing, By Wondering, By Figuring Things Out:" A New Look At Contemporary Homeschooling And Pedagogical Progressivism, Jacques Klapisch

History Honors Theses

Pedagogical progressive education, as defined through the work of John Dewey, Helen Parkhurst, and Carleton Washburne was the precursor to the contemporary homeschooling movement in ideology, practice, and rhetoric as defined by the writing and pedagogy of John Holt. Their shared beliefs in community, student freedom, and good experience as pertinent to education marked the relationship between these two pedagogical methods. Despite Holt's departure from the classroom through his unschooling method, the ideological consistencies between the movement are undeniable, suggesting we rethink the relationship between progressive education and homeschooling and our basic assumptions about the legacy of both movements.


“The White Plague Seems To Love The Black Victim:” The Racialization Of Tuberculosis In The Anti-Tuberculosis Campaign And Black Resistance To The “Negro Tuberculosis Problem,” 1870- 1930, Dillon Prus May 2021

“The White Plague Seems To Love The Black Victim:” The Racialization Of Tuberculosis In The Anti-Tuberculosis Campaign And Black Resistance To The “Negro Tuberculosis Problem,” 1870- 1930, Dillon Prus

History Honors Papers

Tuberculosis was one of the deadliest diseases in late nineteenth and early twentieth century America. Those most impacted by the disease were African Americans living in poverty. White public-health authorities interpreted the Black community’s susceptibility to tuberculosis as evidence of their biological inferiority. However, Black physicians, professors, club women, and nurses courageously resisted these racialized notions via academic journals, medical conferences, and periodicals. Black patients being treated in tuberculosis institutions contributed to sanatorium newspapers such as The Thermometer, establishing a voice to express their pain in ways similar to their white counterparts. Remarkably, physicians of color also found ways ...


The Delaney Murder Case, Helen Hornbeck Tanner May 2021

The Delaney Murder Case, Helen Hornbeck Tanner

Florida Historical Quarterly

The only violent crime to disrupt life in St. Augustine in the early years of the Second Spanish Period was a murderous attack the night of November 20, 1785, on Lieutenant Guillermo Delaney. Since the town’s annals provide almost no reference to such malevolence, this incident appears to be a distinct exception to the general behavior pattern. The crime remains unsolved; yet the evidence accumulated in an effort to identify Delaney’s assailants provides a rare view of Florida colonial society.


The Indian River Settlement: 1842-1849, Joseph D. Cushman, Jr. May 2021

The Indian River Settlement: 1842-1849, Joseph D. Cushman, Jr.

Florida Historical Quarterly

No section of the Territory of Florida suffered more than the east coast as a result of Indian deprecations during the Seminole War. The flourishing sugar plantations of the Halifax country were reduced to charred ruins, the tiny port of New Smyrna was entirely deserted, and the infant citrus industry suffered a staggering setback just as it was beginning to show signs of prosperity. After seven years of fighting, many Floridians gravely doubted the truth of General William Worth’s pontifical pronouncement that the Seminole conflict would be “officially” terminated on August 12, 1842. The settlers were alarmed at the ...


What It Was & What I Know: Attempts At Family History, Katherine Reardon May 2021

What It Was & What I Know: Attempts At Family History, Katherine Reardon

Honors College

Family stories and family histories are contingent on how they are remembered. As these stories are passed down, the ways that they are remembered can change, with the truthful aspects of these stories disappearing over time. As a result, many family stories are not necessarily truthful, but this does not discount their value. The aim of this project is to explore these ideas while also answering the following question: to what extent are family stories bound by the ‘truth’? In order to answer this question, I have explored my own family stories that I know may not be true and ...


Failoure On All Fronts: The United States Army In The First Year Of The War Of 1812, Gary H. Nobbs Jr. May 2021

Failoure On All Fronts: The United States Army In The First Year Of The War Of 1812, Gary H. Nobbs Jr.

History Theses

The United States declared war on the United Kingdom in the hopes of defending the nation's national honor. However, the United States Army was unprepared to go wage war. The army's supply system, militia system, and field commanders failed and led to a disastrous first year of conflict.


Memories From The Great War: An Analysis Of Jackson Purchase Veterans’ Changes In Perspective Since 1914, David Wallace May 2021

Memories From The Great War: An Analysis Of Jackson Purchase Veterans’ Changes In Perspective Since 1914, David Wallace

Honors College Theses

The First World War affected the lives of millions, creating collective memories of hardships, uncertainty, political tension, and animosity toward foreign enemies. In the United States, World War I was a turning point in the nation’s growth and development, but on a smaller scale it was a critical historical moment in the individual lives of the veterans who served. This research project showcases the experiences of the Jackson Purchase’s WWI veterans with an emphasis on their perceptions during the war, their reasons for enlisting, the countless once-in-a-lifetime experiences they had along the way, the hardships they faced, and ...


"At The Peril Of Our Lives": Race, Citizenship, And Philadelphia's 1793 Yellow Fever Epidemic., Abigail Posey May 2021

"At The Peril Of Our Lives": Race, Citizenship, And Philadelphia's 1793 Yellow Fever Epidemic., Abigail Posey

College of Arts & Sciences Senior Honors Theses

The late-eighteenth century was a crucial time for determining the social role of black people in Philadelphia, and Pennsylvania at large. In 1780, the state legislature began a gradual abolition process that contributed to a growing free Black population in the city, while many other Black Philadelphians remained in bondage. Their livelihoods remained restricted by anti-Black laws that contributed to the overall poor health of Black Philadelphians. As the yellow fever epidemic began in 1793, Philadelphia’s medical community supported racist scientific myths that Black people possessed a natural immunity to yellow fever. In an agreement with the city and ...


The Editor's Corner, Florida Historical Society Apr 2021

The Editor's Corner, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Father Jerome of St. Leo’s Abbey, St. Leo, Florida, sends us an interesting note relating the pro’s and con’s of the dispute centering about the identity of the first Catholic Bishop of Florida, and a document which he assures us provides “a definite silencing of the dispute.” The search for this documentary proof led Father Jerome to the Library of Congress, the Hispanic Society of America, and to the Franciscan archives in Washington - all without success.


The American Loyalists In The Bahama Islands: Who They Were, Thelma Peters Apr 2021

The American Loyalists In The Bahama Islands: Who They Were, Thelma Peters

Florida Historical Quarterly

The American loyalists who moved to the Bahama Islands at the close of the American Revolution were from many places and many walks of life so that classification of them is not easy. Still, some patterns do emerge and suggest a prototype with the following characteristics: a man, either first or second generation from Scotland or England, Presbyterian or Anglican, well-educated, and “bred to accounting.” He was living in the South at the time of the American Revolution, either as a merchant, the employee of a merchant, or as a slave-owning planter. When the war came he served in one ...


Documents Pertaining To The Georgia-Florida Frontier, 1791-1793, Richard K. Murdoch Apr 2021

Documents Pertaining To The Georgia-Florida Frontier, 1791-1793, Richard K. Murdoch

Florida Historical Quarterly

During the period from 1784 to 1821, one of the major causes of friction along the St. Marys River, the dividing line between the United States and East Florida, was the frequent disappearance of Negro slaves, usually fleeing from the American bank of the river into the sparsely populated Spanish colony where they hoped to find a refuge with the Indian population or among the freed Negroes and mulattoes in St. Augustine. Frequent arrangements were made by the authorities on both sides to return the runaways as soon as possible to their legitimate owners to avoid unnecessary diplomatic wrangling.


Governor Folch And The Burr Conspiracy, Adam Szaszdi Apr 2021

Governor Folch And The Burr Conspiracy, Adam Szaszdi

Florida Historical Quarterly

The strange episode of American history, the Burr conspiracy, can be considered nowadays a well-known story, and the more so since the publication of Professor Abernethy’s work, The Burr Conspiracy (1954). However, even though pertinent Spanish documents have been taken into consideration, the usual tendency is to view the subject from the perspective of those operating within the United States. Therefore, it should be an interesting experiment to cross the Florida boundary and place ourselves in the shoes of the Spanish authorities of that time.


The Shaker Community In Florida, Russell H. Anderson Apr 2021

The Shaker Community In Florida, Russell H. Anderson

Florida Historical Quarterly

Many residents of Osceola County, Florida, recall a kindly though strange religious group, the Shakers, who once lived near present day St. Cloud-but the memory of these good people is fading. It should be recorded that beginning in 1894, Osceola County was the scene of one of the later efforts of an outstanding utopian movement in America-that of the Shaker religious group.


Zespedes And The Southern Conspiracies, Helen Hornbeck Tanner Apr 2021

Zespedes And The Southern Conspiracies, Helen Hornbeck Tanner

Florida Historical Quarterly

The peace treaty by which the American colonists gained their independence in 1783 created a situation along their southern border almost designed, it seemed, to provoke hostility. By the treaty, the provinces of East and West Florida, which had belonged to Britain for the previous twenty years and had remained loyal to the Crown, were returned to Spain. Thus Europe’s oldest colonial power regained a foothold on the southeastern seaboard of North America, but now was threatened by an ambitious young republic - the first independent nation in the western hemisphere. Furthermore, a portion of the border remained in dispute ...


Gavino Gutierrez And His Contributions To Tampa, Jess L. Keene Apr 2021

Gavino Gutierrez And His Contributions To Tampa, Jess L. Keene

Florida Historical Quarterly

Seventy three years ago the inhabitants around Hillsborough Bay never dreamed of the vast possibilities hidden in the scrub and native forest about them. They never dreamed that a large city was to be built at their own doors and by their own hands.


Indian Presents: To Give Or Not To Give: Governor Whites's Quandary, Richard K. Murdoch Apr 2021

Indian Presents: To Give Or Not To Give: Governor Whites's Quandary, Richard K. Murdoch

Florida Historical Quarterly

At the close of the Eighteenth Century the use of presents to obtain loyalty, friendship, neutrality or allegiance was an old story to the nations of Western Europe, dating back to the days of the Greeks and Romans. Later presents were employed for the same purpose in the feudal period and in the campaigns of the Crusaders in the Holy Land. In the early years of the modern era the Portugese used presents to obtain peaceful entry into African ports as prelude to the slave trade. And finally presents were employed in the Americas by all the colonizing powers as ...


“Edna O’Brien: An Interview With Maureen O’Connor”, Maureen O'Connor, Martha Carpentier, Elizabeth Brewer Redwine Apr 2021

“Edna O’Brien: An Interview With Maureen O’Connor”, Maureen O'Connor, Martha Carpentier, Elizabeth Brewer Redwine

Critical Inquiries Into Irish Studies

No abstract provided.


Letters From Florida In 1851, Olin Norwood Apr 2021

Letters From Florida In 1851, Olin Norwood

Florida Historical Quarterly

Clement Claiborne Clay, 1816-1886, was a son of Governor Clement Comer Clay of Alabama. He was a lawyer by profession, and in 1851 was a county judge. Two years later he was elected to the U. S. Senate, where he served until the outbreak of the Civil War. He declined to be the first Confederate Secretary of War, but was a Confederate senator from 1861 until 1863. In 1864 he undertook a highly secret mission to Canada on behalf of the Confederacy, the results of which are still not completely known. He was accused of participating in the conspiracy to ...


Spymaster Of Setauket: The Impact Of Benjamin Tallmadge And The Culper Spy Ring On The American Revolution, Kyle Burgess Apr 2021

Spymaster Of Setauket: The Impact Of Benjamin Tallmadge And The Culper Spy Ring On The American Revolution, Kyle Burgess

History & Classics Undergraduate Theses

Despite the staunch support that British occupiers enjoyed in New York and Long Island amongst Anglicans, there still remained plenty of citizens whose disdain for their new overseers provided Tallmadge with a large pool to recruit agents. In Patriot super spy Benjamin Tallmadge’s home of Suffolk County, Presbyterians endured an oppressive occupation at the hands of the British Army as many became wartime refugees following the destruction of their farms. This made many of them eager participants in Tallmadge’s schemes and some would even accompany Tallmadge on his whaleboat raids. Although none of these skirmishes proved decisive in ...