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The Histories, Vol. 15, 2018 Mar 2019

The Histories, Vol. 15, 2018

The Histories

No abstract provided.


Morris High School: A Biography, Naomi Sharlin Feb 2019

Morris High School: A Biography, Naomi Sharlin

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Morris High School was conceived and built in the Bronx with a lofty mission: to provide a comprehensive, world-class secondary education to the children of immigrant and working-class families, and in so doing to elevate the American public education system and America itself. Such a weighty mission for an institution would result, one could expect, in painstaking record keeping, the lionization of great leaders, consistent investment in the building, and attention given to problems encountered or created over the years. And yet, the life of Morris High School remains elusive. Key figures in its story are lost to obscurity like ...


“Who Now Shall Believe That Liar, Merlin?”: The Prophecies Of Merlin In History, Megan L. Cairns Jan 2019

“Who Now Shall Believe That Liar, Merlin?”: The Prophecies Of Merlin In History, Megan L. Cairns

Dialogues: Undergraduate Research in Philosophy, History, and Politics

This research article examines Merlin's prophecies and how their political use has shifted from one of belief and of direct political significance, to general disbelief. It examines how the use of prophecy exploited the prestige of King Arthur and Merlin. Tactics used to take advantage of this prestige ranged from rulers claiming blood relation to King Arthur to learned men interpreting existing prophecies. Sources, such as Wace, Geoffrey of Monmouth, and modern day novelists, are used to illustrate the prophecies’ evolution from the twelfth to the twentieth century and what it means.


[Mis-]Managing Fisheries On The West Coast Of Ireland In The Nineteenth Century, John B. Roney Jan 2019

[Mis-]Managing Fisheries On The West Coast Of Ireland In The Nineteenth Century, John B. Roney

History Faculty Publications

This study focuses on the cultural heritage of artisan coastal fishing in the west of Ireland in the 19th century. The town and port of Dingle, County Kerry, offers an important case study on the progress of local development and changing British policies. While there was clearly an abundance of fish, the poverty and the lack of capital for improvements in ports, vessels, gear, education, and transportation, left the fishing industry underdeveloped until well after the 1890s. In addition, a growing rift developed between the traditional farmer-fishermen and the new middle-class capitalist companies. After several royal commissions examined the fishing ...


Deconstructing “Jack”: How Jack The Ripper Became More Fiction Than Fact, Erin Thompson Dec 2018

Deconstructing “Jack”: How Jack The Ripper Became More Fiction Than Fact, Erin Thompson

Augsburg Honors Review

Serial killers have become as much a part of popular culture as athletes and celebrities in the modern age. However, no killer in history remains as identifiable in today’s culture as Jack the Ripper. His name appears in over one hundred books, films, and television shows despite the fact that the murders he committed and the subsequent investigations remain relatively unclear. Regardless, for over a century scholars and historians alike have attempted to understand and unmask Jack the Ripper. While the identity of this elusive killer remains unknown, the stories that Jack the Ripper inspired have led to the ...


Kawamoto, Eric, Cosette Holmes, Tiana Cope-Ferland Nov 2018

Kawamoto, Eric, Cosette Holmes, Tiana Cope-Ferland

Querying the Past: LGBTQ Maine Oral History Project Collection

To completely understand of the history of an oppressed community, we must understand the personal stories of the members of that community. To dig deeper into their stories, the Querying the Past project at the University of Southern Maine collects interviews illuminating the struggle. Specifically, queer people have long struggled to balance their identities in society, overcome discrimination, gain legal rights, and survive disease. This interview with Eric Kawamoto reveals a journey of self-discovery in Chicago, L.A., Boston, and Portland; an intersection between being Asian American and being queer; and survival of AIDS as a result of reserve. Kawamoto ...


The Continuing Relevance Of C. Wright Mills: His Approach To Research And What We Can Learn From It, John E. Miller Nov 2018

The Continuing Relevance Of C. Wright Mills: His Approach To Research And What We Can Learn From It, John E. Miller

Studies in Midwestern History

C. Wright Mills (1916-1962), remembered primarily for his 1956 book, The Power Elite, and for his 1960 essay “Letter to the New Left,” which helped launch the rising New Left in the America of the 1960s, was a major American sociologist, but he also had much to teach historians. Although he focused his research on national and global subjects, students and scholars of regionalism can also learn much from his wide-ranging, critical approach. Like all good sociologists, Mills always assumed that historical context was an essential element of any adequate analysis of society, economics, and politics. Born in Texas, educated ...


The Shanachie, Volume 30, Number 4, Connecticut Irish-American Historical Society Nov 2018

The Shanachie, Volume 30, Number 4, Connecticut Irish-American Historical Society

The Shanachie (CIAHS)

This 16-page issue of our newsletter commemorates the 100th anniversary of the armistice which ended World War I just 100 years ago.

Contents: Connecticut's Irish in World War I --Hartford Red Cross nurse served amid bombardments --Sgt. Stubby and Cpl. Conroy went off to war --With roots in Canada, Lafferty got into the fight early --Picketing White House in wartime: patriotic or treason? --Ansonia native among nation’s first female sailors --Medals and monument honor Fair Haven Irish lads --Daring young men in their flying machines --Knights of Columbus offered soup and solace for friend and foe alike --Sailor ...


The Germans And Swiss At The Battle Of The Little Bighorn 1876, Albert Winkler Nov 2018

The Germans And Swiss At The Battle Of The Little Bighorn 1876, Albert Winkler

All Faculty Publications

The purpose of this study is to examine the Germans and the Swiss who participated in the Battle of the Little Bighorn to understand who they were, to assess their motives for joining the cavalry, and to appraise their experience in battle.


Liminality Of The Japanese Empire: Border Crossings From Okinawa To Colonial Taiwan, Hiroko Matsuda Oct 2018

Liminality Of The Japanese Empire: Border Crossings From Okinawa To Colonial Taiwan, Hiroko Matsuda

UH Press Book Previews

Okinawa, one of the smallest prefectures of Japan, has drawn much international attention because of the long-standing presence of US bases and the people’s resistance against them. In recent years, alternative discourses on Okinawa have emerged due to the territorial disputes over the Senkaku Islands, and the media often characterizes Okinawa as the borderland demarcating Japan, China (PRC), and Taiwan (ROC). While many politicians and opinion makers discuss Okinawa’s national and security interests, little attention is paid to the local perspective toward the national border and local residents’ historical experiences of border crossings.

Through archival research and first-hand ...


After Faith, Hope, And Love: The Unique Divergence Of Asceticism By Gregory The Great And Maximus The Confessor, Caleb N. Zuiderveen Oct 2018

After Faith, Hope, And Love: The Unique Divergence Of Asceticism By Gregory The Great And Maximus The Confessor, Caleb N. Zuiderveen

Theses and Dissertations

In the late sixth and early seventh centuries, asceticism continued as a frequent expression of Christian devotion. Despite communications between the Eastern and Western Churches and a common patristic foundation, theology in the East and West during this time diverged on the results of asceticism. This paper explores this divergence by examining two theologians, Gregory the Great and Maximus the Confessor. Current scholarship has examined Gregory the Great and Maximus the Confessor on their own, yet the dialogue between each tradition and its implications remains understudied. Thus, this study contextualizes Gregory the Great’s On the Song of Songs and ...


The Plight Of Wage-Earning Women In Peoria, 1905-1915, Cheryl Kay Fogler Oct 2018

The Plight Of Wage-Earning Women In Peoria, 1905-1915, Cheryl Kay Fogler

Theses and Dissertations

This thesis examines the conditions of wage-earning women in Peoria, Illinois, during the first two decades of the twentieth century. I present the plight of wage-earning women as well as the well-intended efforts of both local and national crusaders who helped the working women of Peoria survive and in some cases overcome hardships.


Anti-Sabbatarianism In Antebellum America: The Christian Quarrel Over The Sanctity Of Sunday, Kathryn Kaslow Oct 2018

Anti-Sabbatarianism In Antebellum America: The Christian Quarrel Over The Sanctity Of Sunday, Kathryn Kaslow

Theses and Dissertations

In the first half of the 1800s, American Christians posed fundamental questions about the role of faith in daily life by debating blue laws, which restricted Sunday travel, mail delivery, and recreational activities on the basis of the Fourth Commandment. Historians have largely focused on how pro-blue law Christians, or Sabbatarians, answered these questions. They also present anti-Sabbatarian concerns as socially, economically, or politically motivated, largely ignoring religion. However, an examination of religious periodicals, convention reports, correspondence, and petitions shows that many anti-Sabbatarians did indeed frame their arguments in theological terms. Case studies from various faith traditions over four decades ...


Téacsúil Fionnachtain, Alan B. Delozier Sep 2018

Téacsúil Fionnachtain, Alan B. Delozier

Critical Inquiries Into Irish Studies

“Textual Discovery,” by the Seton Hall University Library Archivist, Alan Delozier, is presented to pique interest in the obscure, yet unique works in Irish language, literature, and history that have been largely forgotten over time. Articles will cover different subject areas, authors, themes, and eras related to the depth and consequence of the Gaeilge experience in its varied forms.


O’Casey Vs. Sheehy-Skeffington: Tragicomedy In The Plough And The Stars And The Feminist Protest, Martha Carpentier Sep 2018

O’Casey Vs. Sheehy-Skeffington: Tragicomedy In The Plough And The Stars And The Feminist Protest, Martha Carpentier

Critical Inquiries Into Irish Studies

Martha C. Carpentier is Professor of English at Seton Hall University in New Jersey, where she teaches courses in 20th-century British and Irish literature. Most recently, she is the editor of Joycean Legacies (Palgrave MacMillan 2015) and author of articles on James Joyce, George Orwell, and Graham Greene that have appeared in Mosaic and Joyce Studies Annual. She is a co-editor of Critical Inquiries Into Irish Studies.


Jay Flippin Collection, Department Of Music, Theatre & Dance, Russell Jay Flippin Sep 2018

Jay Flippin Collection, Department Of Music, Theatre & Dance, Russell Jay Flippin

University Archives Finding Aids

No abstract provided.


An Economy Of Violence: Financial Crisis And Whig Constitutional Thought, 1720-1721, Adam Lebovitz Sep 2018

An Economy Of Violence: Financial Crisis And Whig Constitutional Thought, 1720-1721, Adam Lebovitz

Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities

The South Sea bubble burst suddenly in September 1720, the second in a chain of panics that struck Paris, London, and Amsterdam in quick succession. The crash in London was by far the most severe; within weeks two-thirds of England's nominal wealth had evaporated, public credit had collapsed, and London's most distinguished banking houses tottered on the brink of ruin. Commerce ground to a halt, leaving a forest of half-built ships rotting in city harbors and a thicket of unfinished mansions in London's fashionable districts.


Xavier University Newswire, Xavier University - Cincinnati Aug 2018

Xavier University Newswire, Xavier University - Cincinnati

All Xavier Student Newspapers

No abstract provided.


“‘Fountains Of Joy’: Alcohol Culture In Mid-Nineteenth Century Missouri”, Marlin C. Barber Aug 2018

“‘Fountains Of Joy’: Alcohol Culture In Mid-Nineteenth Century Missouri”, Marlin C. Barber

International Journal of Hospitality Beverage Management

This article seeks to articulate a cultural connection between nineteenth century Missourians and their production, distribution, and use of alcohol. Admitted as a state in 1821, Missouri was at geographic and cultural crossroads along the western border of the United States and many of the people who resided in the state found that alcohol was a significant social conduit in addition to supplementing their income. Sources such as sales records, personal letters, and newspapers reveal that over the century, the state witnessed an influx of migrants from across the United States and parts of Europe who each held their own ...


Literary Continuities/Imperative Education, Jane Snyder Jul 2018

Literary Continuities/Imperative Education, Jane Snyder

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Literary Continuities: British Books and the Britishness of Their Early American Readers People get their worldview from what they read. in a reading-saturated society such as 18th-century America, the most popular books determined the public consciousness. as such, the origin of these books must be carefully examined. Herein lies the question of whose books and ideas were popularized. According to quantitative analysis of primary evidence gathered from private and public library collections as well as booksellers' advertisements and inventories, the majority of books read in 18th-century America could be considered British more than American. Before, during, and after the American ...


"By The Dear, Immortal Memory Of Washington"/The Baptists, Culture, And The Law In Eighteenth-Century Virginia, Douglas Breton Jul 2018

"By The Dear, Immortal Memory Of Washington"/The Baptists, Culture, And The Law In Eighteenth-Century Virginia, Douglas Breton

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

"By the Dear, Immortal Memory of Washington" Americans have long used the Founding Fathers as symbols of patriotism, invoking their names and using their images whenever they wish to demonstrate that a particular way of thinking or acting is true to American ideals. The vague patriotic image of the founders tends to eclipse their actual character, allowing diverse and competing movements to all use them. This has been especially true of George Washington, who long enjoyed a preeminent and almost mythic status among the founders. During the 1860s, both secessionists and unionists claimed him as their own in order to ...


Re-Mapping Tacoma's Pre-War Japantown: Living On The Tideflats, Lisa Hoffman, Mary Hanneman, Sarah Pyle Jul 2018

Re-Mapping Tacoma's Pre-War Japantown: Living On The Tideflats, Lisa Hoffman, Mary Hanneman, Sarah Pyle

Conflux

This article, drawing on oral histories with Nisei, addresses the dearth of publications about pre-WWII Japanese life in the urban U.S. and provides evidence of Japanese immigrants’ active presence in the lumber industry and on Tacoma’s tideflats. This is important not only for Tacoma’s history and a fuller accounting of the major industries that shaped the south Puget Sound region, but also because Japanese contributions to early industrial development are often overlooked. The oral history narratives also stretch the boundaries of what has been depicted as a densely-connected and lively Japanese community in the downtown core. Also ...


Traces Volume 46, Number 2, Kentucky Library Research Collections Jul 2018

Traces Volume 46, Number 2, Kentucky Library Research Collections

Traces, the Southern Central Kentucky, Barren County Genealogical Newsletter

Traces, the South Central Kentucky Genealogical Society's quarterly newsletter, was first published in 1973. The Society changed its name in 2016 to the Barren County Historical Society. The publication features compiled genealogies, articles on local history, single-family studies and unpublished source materials related to this area.


Racial Constructions And Activism Within Graphic Literature. An Analysis Of Hank Mccoy, The Beast, Juan D. Alfonso Jun 2018

Racial Constructions And Activism Within Graphic Literature. An Analysis Of Hank Mccoy, The Beast, Juan D. Alfonso

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Through a post-modern lens, I will primarily focus on comics books published by Marvel Comics to demonstrate the myriad of ways in which graphic literature is used as a subversive tool of sociopolitical discourse. I will demonstrate this by deconstructing and redefining the role of myth as a means of transferring ethical practices through societies and the ways in which graphic literature serves this function within the space of a modern and increasingly atheistic society. The thesis first demonstrates how the American Civil Rights Movement was metaphorically translated and depicted to the pages of Marvel’s X-Men comics to expose ...


"For All Such, A Country Is Provided": Choctaw Removal, Slave Trading, And Law In Southwestern Mississippi, 1800-1841, Anthony Albey Soliman Jun 2018

"For All Such, A Country Is Provided": Choctaw Removal, Slave Trading, And Law In Southwestern Mississippi, 1800-1841, Anthony Albey Soliman

Master's Theses and Project Reports

At the beginning of the nineteenth century there were few white settlers in the Mississippi Territory. Over the course of two decades, the United States used treaties to force the indigenous inhabitants, the Choctaw, out of this area by the United States to lands west of the Mississippi River. The United States’ goal in the region was to create a plantation economy in the Mississippi Valley based on the production of short-staple cotton sustained by enslaved African American labor. Focusing on the removal of the Choctaw and the subsequent installation of a plantation regime in the Mississippi Valley, this thesis ...


'Just Call Me Bill': William Taft Brings Spectacle Politics To The Midwest, Jeffrey Bourdon May 2018

'Just Call Me Bill': William Taft Brings Spectacle Politics To The Midwest, Jeffrey Bourdon

Studies in Midwestern History

Historians long rated William Howard Taft’s campaigning ability during the 1908 presidential contest as below average and in need of Theodore Roosevelt’s resuscitation. Recently, they have given Taft more credit for his electioneering appearances. Taft’s ability to teach out to voters was vital to his candidacy because he ran at a time in American political history when the ability to deliver charismatic speeches and shake hands was put at a premium by larger-than-life candidates such as Roosevelt, William Jennings Bryan, and Eugene Debs.

Taft toured several regions during the campaign, including the Midwest, the South, the Mid-Atlantic ...


At Risk Youths: Schools, Juvenile Delinquency, And The Prison Industrial Complex, Ashantia M. Day May 2018

At Risk Youths: Schools, Juvenile Delinquency, And The Prison Industrial Complex, Ashantia M. Day

Cultural Studies Capstone Papers

Juvenile delinquency has been a social issue for many decades. While much research has studied the deviant behaviors of the adolescent, little focus has been placed on the degree to which the school environment plays on delinquent behavior. The purpose of this project is to use schools as the subject to contextualize the !ink bet\"Jeen racia!ized criminalization and the disproportionate rate at which black youths are in contact with the Juvenile Justice System. This work will apply labeling theory, theories of academic tracking/grouping, use of analytic autobiography, critical race theory and a Marxist critique of capitalism to ...


Feminist Oral History Practice In An Era Of Digital Self-Representation, Margo Shea May 2018

Feminist Oral History Practice In An Era Of Digital Self-Representation, Margo Shea

Margo Shea

Beyond Women’s Words unites feminist scholars, artists, and community activists working with the stories of women and other historically marginalized subjects to address the contributions and challenges of doing feminist oral history.

Feminists who work with oral history methods want to tell stories that matter. They know, too, that the telling of those stories—the processes by which they are generated and recorded, and the different contexts in which they are shared and interpreted—also matters—a lot. Using Sherna Berger Gluckand Daphne Patai’s classic text, Women’s Words, as a platform to reflect on how feminisms, broadly ...


When The World Seemed New: Ue Local 301 And The Decline Of The American Labor Movement, Jacob Houser May 2018

When The World Seemed New: Ue Local 301 And The Decline Of The American Labor Movement, Jacob Houser

History Honors Program

On February 19, 1954 Senator Joseph McCarthy made his return to Albany, New York to expunge any subversive elements within the defense industry, particularly at the Schenectady General Electric plant. McCarthy was willing to bring anyone down with him that he could. A man named Charles Rivers was called forth to testify on the first day of the hearings. Rivers did not know that he was being brought before Senator McCarthy as a suspected Communist, but McCarthy in turn did not know that Rivers did not even work for General Electric. Once he realized he had the wrong man, all ...


From Dago To White: The Story Of Sicilian Ethnic Evolution In New Orleans Amidst The Yellow Fever Epidemic Of 1905, H. Denise Lopresto Saucier May 2018

From Dago To White: The Story Of Sicilian Ethnic Evolution In New Orleans Amidst The Yellow Fever Epidemic Of 1905, H. Denise Lopresto Saucier

Master's Theses

The story of the Sicilian immigrants’ experiences in Louisiana is a tale of racial and ethnic evolution in the face of physical threats. With the end of the Civil War, many emancipated slaves migrated to other parts of the country, which left Louisiana planters in need of laborers. Planters turned to European labor to fill that need, bringing thousands of Sicilian peasants to work on their plantations. Extreme poverty and oppression made the opportunity to emigrate highly attractive, but Sicilians found problems in Louisiana as well. In addition to low wages, crowded living conditions, discrimination, and violence, the immigrants faced ...