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A Glorious Assemblage: The Rise Of The Know-Nothing Party In Louisiana, Ryan M. Hall Jan 2015

A Glorious Assemblage: The Rise Of The Know-Nothing Party In Louisiana, Ryan M. Hall

LSU Master's Theses

Between 1853 and 1856, the nativist and anti-Catholic Know-Nothing party became a powerful political force in Louisiana despite the state’s unique religious and political makeup. This thesis studies the rise of the party in three regions of the state: New Orleans, the Sugar Parishes, and North Louisiana and the Florida Parishes to show that the party gained popularity in the state differently in different regions. In New Orleans, the party rejected anti-Catholicism and adopted a stance against political corruption. In the Sugar Parishes, the Know-Nothings were merely a continuation of the Whig Party under a new name. In North ...


Nationalization And Regionalism In 1920s College Football, Bennett Jeffery Koerber Jan 2015

Nationalization And Regionalism In 1920s College Football, Bennett Jeffery Koerber

LSU Master's Theses

By illuminating the complexities of 1920s American society, college football serves as a remarkably insightful cultural device. At the commencement of the decade, a national business community – one that had been developing since the late nineteenth century – appeared to have come to fruition. The more connected nature of the country served to homogenize the United States economically, politically, and even socially. Citizens who had once lived autonomously found themselves more interconnected with neighboring regions of the country, and thus increasingly defined by national characteristics. This served as an internal crisis of sorts because regional identity operated as a unique and ...


Queenship, Intrigue And Blood-Feud: Deciphering The Causes Of The Merovingian Civil Wars, 561-613, Brandon Taylor Craft Jan 2013

Queenship, Intrigue And Blood-Feud: Deciphering The Causes Of The Merovingian Civil Wars, 561-613, Brandon Taylor Craft

LSU Master's Theses

The Frankish civil wars of AD 561-613 were a series of devastating encounters involving the four sons of Chlothar I and their descendants. While no party was guiltless during this period, modern scholars have tended to focus on two prominent Queens, Brunhild of Austrasia and Fredegund of Neustria, and the possibility of a blood-feud between their two families. King Sigibert of Austrasia married Brunhild because he believed she was worthy of a king, unlike many of the wives his brothers were taking. One of these women was Fredegund, who was married to King Chilperic of Neustria. Fredegund is often blamed ...


British Identity And The German Other, William F. Bertolette Jan 2012

British Identity And The German Other, William F. Bertolette

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

British identity evolved through conscious comparisons with foreigners as well as through the cultivation of indigenous social, economic and political institutions. The German other in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Britain, like the French other in previous centuries, provided a psychological path toward unity against a perceived common enemy. Because German stereotypes brought into sharp focus what the British believed themselves not to be, they provided a framework for defining Britishness beyond Britain’s own internal divisions of race, ethnicity, class, religion, gender and politics. Post-World War II devolution and European integration have since revived British internal national divisions. The image of ...


Rebels, Settlers And Violence: Rebellion In Western Munster 1641-2, Christopher Sailus Jan 2012

Rebels, Settlers And Violence: Rebellion In Western Munster 1641-2, Christopher Sailus

LSU Master's Theses

This study challenges current historical assumptions about the nature, scope, and timeframe of the 1641 Irish Rebellion in Kerry, Clare, and Limerick counties in western Munster. Placing the start of the popular rebellion in these counties around 1 January 1642, the beginning of unrest is set several months further back. In the process of analyzing the actions of popular and organized rebels alike, the motivations for rebellion are characterized as political and social rather than religious. In turn, seventeenth-century Irish society was transformed from the traditional narrative of a rigid, religiously-divided society into something far more complex and amorphous, with ...


Imperial Consensus: The English Press And India, 1919-1935, David Lilly Jan 2012

Imperial Consensus: The English Press And India, 1919-1935, David Lilly

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

Between 1919 and 1935, the lion’s share of the interwar era, the British government’s most important overriding task was constitutional reform of India. The subcontinent’s importance to Britain was undoubted: economically as an important trading partner and militarily a source of fighting men and material, as demonstrated in the Great War. However, scholars have relegated India to a relatively minor topic and instead have portrayed Britain’s interwar period as the era of appeasement. Appeasement only became an issue in 1935 and a major topic with the Munich crisis of September 1938. Voluminous press coverage of the ...


Canning Foods And Selling Modernity: The Canned Food Industry And Consumer Culture, 1898-1945, Kristi Renee Whitfield Jan 2012

Canning Foods And Selling Modernity: The Canned Food Industry And Consumer Culture, 1898-1945, Kristi Renee Whitfield

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

At the turn of the twentieth century, Americans feared commercially canned foods. From the Spanish American War until well into the 1920’s, canned foods received a barrage of media attacks and accusations of unhealthiness, lack of cleanliness, and a lack of transparency and regulation in processing. Moreover, as gastrointestinal distress was quite prevalent among American society, many Americans feared that it was commercial foods that were making them sick. By the time Americans were coming home from World War II, the climate of opinion concerning commercially canned foods had changed, and this was in large part due to the ...


Providing For The Common Defense: Internal Security And The Cold War, 1945-1975, Marc A. Patenaude Jan 2011

Providing For The Common Defense: Internal Security And The Cold War, 1945-1975, Marc A. Patenaude

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

While the historiography of the Red Scare has often discussed the major internal security legislation passed during the period, the legislation in question is often given short shrift and characterized as a misguided response by Congress. It is important to examine this legislation not only for what it did for the internal security of the nation, but also for what it meant symbolically. Implementation of governmental policy, including internal security policy, through legislation often also serves as a window to the beliefs and values of those crafting the legislation. By examining the internal security legislation passed during the Red Scare ...


The Influence Of Humanism On English Social Structures Through The Actions Of Thomas Linacre And John Colet, Erin Michelle Halloran Jan 2011

The Influence Of Humanism On English Social Structures Through The Actions Of Thomas Linacre And John Colet, Erin Michelle Halloran

LSU Master's Theses

When the Renaissance was in its full bloom in Italy, England was just beginning to show awareness of this ‘new learning’- humanism. In the mid- 1400s English scholars traveled abroad to Italy and collected books, knowledge, and learned the Greek language. Thomas Linacre and John Colet were part of a younger generation that benefited from this previous experience and both men travelled to Italy to continue their scholarly pursuits. Linacre arrived in Florence during the height of humanist scholarship. While there he came under the influence of medical humanists, devoted to the translation of ancient medical texts from Greek into ...


"The Bald Knobbers Of Southwest Missouri, 1885-1889: A Study Of Vigilante Justice In The Ozarks.", Matthew James Hernando Jan 2011

"The Bald Knobbers Of Southwest Missouri, 1885-1889: A Study Of Vigilante Justice In The Ozarks.", Matthew James Hernando

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

The Bald Knobbers of Southwest Missouri were a vigilante organization that originated in Taney County, Missouri, in 1885, before spreading to adjacent Christian and Douglas counties in ensuing years. They began as a group dedicated to protecting life and property, aiding law enforcement officials in the apprehension of criminals, opposing corruption in local government, and punishing those who violated the social and religious mores of their community. In some places, the vigilantes gained much political influence, occupied key offices, and became effectively the ruling faction in local politics. They made many enemies, however, with whom they had several violent, sometimes ...


German Enemy Aliens And The Decine Of British Liberalism In World War I, Ansley L. Macenczak Jan 2010

German Enemy Aliens And The Decine Of British Liberalism In World War I, Ansley L. Macenczak

LSU Master's Theses

After the start of World War I in 1914, the British government began internment of enemy alien men, disrupting the large German population settled in the country. This move seemed to be in complete contrast in comparison to the lax immigration laws during the long nineteenth century, when Great Britain had one of the most liberal immigration laws of any country in Europe. The British public was proud of this tradition and Britain’s image as an open haven for refugees and individuals seeking a better life. Foreigners were attracted to Britain by its liberal traditions, most clearly exemplified by ...


Mr. Kerry Goes To Washington: Lord Lothian And The Genesis Of The Anglo-American Alliance, 1939-1940, Craig Edward Saucier Jan 2008

Mr. Kerry Goes To Washington: Lord Lothian And The Genesis Of The Anglo-American Alliance, 1939-1940, Craig Edward Saucier

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

The purpose of this dissertation is to examine and assess the role of Philip Henry Kerr, eleventh Marquis of Lothian, the British ambassador to the United States from August 1939 to December 1940. While much of the historiography of Anglo-American relations during the Second World War focuses on the Roosevelt-Churchill axis, this dissertation contends that Lord Lothian played a vital, if not the principal, role in creating that axis and in forging closer relations during the vital months before Pearl Harbor. More generally, this dissertation contends that Lothian is a vital, if not the principal, architect of the “Special Relationship ...


The Second Coming Of Paisley: Militant Fundamentalism And Ulster Politics In A Transatlantic Context, Richard Lawrence Jordan Jan 2008

The Second Coming Of Paisley: Militant Fundamentalism And Ulster Politics In A Transatlantic Context, Richard Lawrence Jordan

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

Jordan, Richard L. B. A. University of Southern Mississippi, 2000. M. A. University of Southern Mississippi, 2002. Doctor of Philosophy, Fall Commencement, 2008. Major: History. The Second Coming of Paisley: Militant Fundamentalism and Ulster Politics in a Transatlantic Context. Dissertation directed by Associate Professor Meredith Veldman. Pages in dissertation, 345. Words in Abstract, 277. ABSTRACT On August 1, 1946, the Reverend Ian Paisley was ordained as the minister of the Ravenhill Evangelical Mission Church in Belfast, Northern Ireland. From his new pulpit, the young evangelist embarked on a six-decade crusade attacking Irish theological and political issues and espousing militant fundamentalism ...


Religion Beyond The Empire: British Religious Politics In China, 1842-1866, Joshua Thomas Marr Jan 2007

Religion Beyond The Empire: British Religious Politics In China, 1842-1866, Joshua Thomas Marr

LSU Master's Theses

Nineteenth-Century Britain was known for its political and military power – the British Empire – but also for its religious fervor. This religious spirit was prominent in England and throughout the British Empire, through the creation of Protestant mission organizations that sent missionaries throughout the world. China presented a unique mission field for early British missionaries, as it was not a formal part of the British Empire and it had such a large population of people who had never been exposed to Protestant Christianity. The years 1842 to 1866 were the formative period of the British Protestant mission in China ...


"A Kind Providence" And "The Right To Self Preservation": How Andrew Jackson, Emersonian Whiggery, And Frontier Calvinism Shaped The Course Of American Political Culture, Ryan Ruckel Jan 2006

"A Kind Providence" And "The Right To Self Preservation": How Andrew Jackson, Emersonian Whiggery, And Frontier Calvinism Shaped The Course Of American Political Culture, Ryan Ruckel

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

Andrew Jackson has inspired numerous biographies and works of historical scholarship, but his religious views have attracted very little attention. Jackson may have been a giant on the political landscape, but he was also a human being, an ordinary American who experienced the same difficulties and challenges as other Americans of the early nineteenth century. Another common experience for many Americans of Jackson’s day included church life, revivals, and efforts to conceptualize every day events within the context of religious experience. Finding out where Jackson stood on religion and what role religion played in his thinking helps situate him ...


Politics Of The Personal In The Old North State: Griffith Rutherford In Revolutionary North Carolina, James Matthew Mac Donald Jan 2006

Politics Of The Personal In The Old North State: Griffith Rutherford In Revolutionary North Carolina, James Matthew Mac Donald

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

In the annals of North Carolina history, few figures stand out more than Griffith Rutherford. An orphan when he arrived in the new world, Rutherford settled in the North Carolina backcountry two decades before the American Revolution. Almost immediately he ascended a social and economic ladder in Rowan County in his service as a soldier and elected assemblyman. A consummate “fixer” during his military career, Rutherford continually rushed to scenes when a Loyalist insurrections or party of marauding Indians threatened the state. As a militia general during the Revolution he was responsible for the defense of the entire western quadrant ...


The Free World Confronted: The Problem Of Slavery And Progress In American Foreign Relations, 1833-1844, Steven Heath Mitton Jan 2005

The Free World Confronted: The Problem Of Slavery And Progress In American Foreign Relations, 1833-1844, Steven Heath Mitton

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

Enacted in 1833, Great Britain’s abolition of West Indian slavery confronted the United States with the complex interrelationship between slavery and progress. Dubbed the Great Experiment, British abolition held the possibility of demonstrating free labor more profitable than slavery. Besides elating the world’s abolitionists, always hopeful of equating material with moral progress, the experiment’s success would benefit Britain economically. Presented evidence of the greater profits of free labor, slaveholders worldwide would find themselves with compelling reason to abandon slavery. Likewise, London policymakers would proceed with little need—and no economic incentive—to promote abolition in British foreign ...


Sufficient To Make Heaven Weep: The American Army In The Mexican War, Brian M. Mcgowan Jan 2005

Sufficient To Make Heaven Weep: The American Army In The Mexican War, Brian M. Mcgowan

LSU Master's Theses

The Mexican War, 1846-1848, has often been overlooked in American history. Scholars have been more interested in assigning blame for the conflict, or assessing the role played by the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo in the coming of the Civil War. Only recently have scholars made any attempt to understand the motivations and attitudes brought to Mexico by American soldiers. This thesis focuses on how the racial and religious attitudes of American soldiers during the war were an implementation of the nationalism inherent in Manifest Destiny. Americans used their perceived racial and religious superiority to further the goals of Manifest Destiny. Mexico ...


German Stereotypes In British Magazines Prior To World War I, William F. Bertolette Jan 2004

German Stereotypes In British Magazines Prior To World War I, William F. Bertolette

LSU Master's Theses

The British image of Germany as England's "poor relation," a backward cluster of feudal states, gave way during the nineteenth century to the stereotype of England's archenemy and imperial rival. This shift from innocuous Old Germany to menacing New Germany accelerated after German unification in 1871 as German economic growth and imperial ambitions became topics for commentary in British journals. But the stereotypical "German Michael," or rustic simpleton, and other images of self-effacing servile, loyal, honest and passive Old Germany lingered on into the late nineteenth century as a "straw man" for alarmist Germanophobes to dispel with new ...


Seasons In Hell: Charles S. Johnson And The 1930 Liberian Labor Crisis, Phillip James Johnson Jan 2004

Seasons In Hell: Charles S. Johnson And The 1930 Liberian Labor Crisis, Phillip James Johnson

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

In 1930, African American sociologist Charles S. Johnson of Fisk University traveled to the Republic of Liberia as the American member of a League of Nations commission to investigate allegations of slavery and forced labor in that West African nation. In the previous five years, the face of Liberia had changed after the large-scale development of rubber plantations on land leased by the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, with headquarters in Akron, Ohio. Political turmoil greeted Johnson in Liberia, an underdeveloped nation teetering on the brink of economic collapse. This dissertation focuses on Johnson’s role as the key member ...


Beyond The Solid South: Southern Members Of Congress And The Vietnam War, Mark David Carson Jan 2003

Beyond The Solid South: Southern Members Of Congress And The Vietnam War, Mark David Carson

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

From the beginning of America's involvement in Vietnam in 1943 to its disastrous end in 1975, southern members of Congress exerted a significant influence on and expressed divergent opinions about Cold War foreign policy. In part because of an enormous increase in military spending in the South fueled by prominent membership on military committees, congressional hawks were more inclined to support military aid for countries fighting communism and accept military over civilian advice in prosecuting the Cold War. Hawkish southerners embraced containment wholeheartedly, exhibited an intense patriotism, and concerned themselves with upholding personal and national honor. Therefore, with some ...


Louisiana During Reconstruction., William Edward Highsmith Jan 1954

Louisiana During Reconstruction., William Edward Highsmith

LSU Historical Dissertations and Theses

No abstract provided.