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2009

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Interview With David Emery By Mike Hastings, David F. Emery Dec 2009

Interview With David Emery By Mike Hastings, David F. Emery

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
David Farnham Emery was born on September 1, 1948, in Rockland, Maine. His father was a bookkeeper, accountant, and golfer (he also played baseball for the University of Pennsylvania), and his mother was a nurse. Both parents served in the military during World War II, his father as a staff sergeant and his mother as an officer. He grew up in a Republican family and attended Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts from 1967-1970. He was elected to the Maine legislature immediately after graduation, during the Vietnam War. In 1974, he was elected as a U.S. congressman ...


Unity, Charity, And Fraternity: Father Michael Mcgivney And The Knights Of Columbus, Kathleen A. Bruno Dec 2009

Unity, Charity, And Fraternity: Father Michael Mcgivney And The Knights Of Columbus, Kathleen A. Bruno

Pell Scholars and Senior Theses

My thesis discusses the reasons for the creation of the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal organization, in 1881. I discuss why Father Michael McGivney, a Catholic priest in New Haven, Connecticut, believed that the organization was necessary to prevent Catholic men from joining the "secret societies" of the nineteenth century. I also explain the present-day Knights of Columbus and how McGivney's vision is carried out today through the Order.


Rhode Island's Greatest Natural Tragedy, Stephanie N. Blaine Dec 2009

Rhode Island's Greatest Natural Tragedy, Stephanie N. Blaine

Pell Scholars and Senior Theses

The infamous hurricane of 1938 accelerated the ongoing transformation of Rhode Island’s way of life.


“The Youngest Of The Great American Family”: The Creation Of A Franco-American Culture In Early Louisiana, Cinnamon Brown Dec 2009

“The Youngest Of The Great American Family”: The Creation Of A Franco-American Culture In Early Louisiana, Cinnamon Brown

Doctoral Dissertations

On April 30, 1803, the Jefferson administration purchased French Louisiana. Initially American lawmakers rejoiced at the prospect of American domination of the Mississippi River. Yet within a few short months this optimism was replaced with uncertainty and alarm as lawmakers faced the task of incorporating Lower Louisiana into the Union. As Americans tackled the many unintended consequences of the Louisiana Purchase, Louisianans also had to confront the ramifications of the landmark acquisition and the encroachment of a new American government in their lives. From 1803 to 1815, American lawmakers and Louisianans embarked on a parallel journey to incorporate Lower Louisiana ...


Interview With Martha Pope And David Pozorski By Brien Williams, Martha Pope, David R. Pozorski Nov 2009

Interview With Martha Pope And David Pozorski By Brien Williams, Martha Pope, David R. Pozorski

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Martha Pope was born in Newcastle, Pennsylvania, and grew up in Connecticut. She attended the University of Connecticut, majoring in sociology with minors in psychology and statistics and in art. She earned a master’s degree in art education at Southern Connecticut University. She taught art for five years in elementary and junior high school, and then she moved to Washington, D.C. and started work on Capitol Hill. She worked for Senator John Culver, and when Culver lost his bid for reelection, Senator Mitchell kept her on as Environment and Public Works Committee staff focusing on fish ...


Interview With Alan Simpson By Brien Williams, Alan K. Simpson Nov 2009

Interview With Alan Simpson By Brien Williams, Alan K. Simpson

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Alan K. Simpson was born September 2, 1931. He attended Cody, Wyoming, public schools and the University of Wyoming, taking a B.S. degree in 1954 and a law degree in 1958. In 1954, he married Susan Ann Schroll, who was a fellow student at the University of Wyoming. He practiced law in Cody, held positions as assistant attorney general and city attorney, and was a United States Commissioner from 1959-1969. He was elected to the Wyoming House of Representatives from 1964-1977. Subsequently, he served in the U.S. Senate as a Republican representing Wyoming from 1979-1997, first ...


Interview With Pat Sarcone By Brien Williams, Patricia 'Pat' A. Sarcone Sep 2009

Interview With Pat Sarcone By Brien Williams, Patricia 'Pat' A. Sarcone

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Patricia Ann Sarcone was born in Newport, Rhode Island. She grew up in Des Moines, Iowa, and was graduated from St. Mary College in Leavenworth, Kansas, with a degree in business administration. In 1969 she joined Iowa Senator Harold Hughes’s staff in Washington, DC, where she remained until 1975. She then worked on Iowa Senator John Culver’s staff until 1980, when she joined Walter Mondale’s presidential campaign. She worked for Occidental International before joining Senator George Mitchell’s staff in 1988, working as Mitchell’s executive assistant until he retired in 1994, when she transitioned ...


The Double Life Of St. Louis: Narratives Of Origins And Maturity In Wade’S Urban Frontier, Adam Arenson Aug 2009

The Double Life Of St. Louis: Narratives Of Origins And Maturity In Wade’S Urban Frontier, Adam Arenson

Adam Arenson

A half-century after Richard C. Wade's landmark history The Urban Frontier: The Rise of Western Cities, 1790-1830, this retrospective essay considers the development of St. Louis in relation to evolving notions of the frontier as a space of intercultural encounter, and the maturation of a city economically in relation to its cultural and political conflicts. It reviews the scholarship on the city of St. Louis since Wade wrote, and suggests new avenues in the city's history.


Interview With Barbara Keefe By Andrea L’Hommedieu, Barbara Keefe Aug 2009

Interview With Barbara Keefe By Andrea L’Hommedieu, Barbara Keefe

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Barbara Keefe was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, in 1940, and grew up in Trenton, New Jersey. She was graduated from Seton Hall University. She received a fellowship to study deaf education and worked at the Governor Baxter School for the Deaf, Mackworth Island, Maine. She joined the League of Women Voters and became involved in the National Women’s Political Caucus. She was treasurer for Senator Mitchell’s reelection campaigns in 1982 and 1988, and she has served on the Mitchell Institute Board since 1994.

Summary
Interview includes discussion of: Keefe’s introduction to politics through ...


The Temperance Worker As Social Reformer And Ethnographer As Exemplified In The Life And Work Of Jessie A. Ackermann., Margaret Shipley Carr Aug 2009

The Temperance Worker As Social Reformer And Ethnographer As Exemplified In The Life And Work Of Jessie A. Ackermann., Margaret Shipley Carr

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This project used primary historical documents from the Jessie A. Ackermann collection at ETSU's Archives of Appalachia, other books and documents from the temperance period, and recent scholarship on the subjects of temperance, suffrage, and women travelers and civilizers. As the second world missionary for the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Ackermann traveled in order to establish WCT Unions and worked as a civilizer, feminist, and reporter of the conditions of women and the disadvantaged throughout the world.


Roosevelt, Churchill, And The Words Of War: Their Speeches And Correspondence, November 1940-March 1941., Leslie A. Mattingly Bean Aug 2009

Roosevelt, Churchill, And The Words Of War: Their Speeches And Correspondence, November 1940-March 1941., Leslie A. Mattingly Bean

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Prime Minister Winston Churchill and President Franklin Roosevelt inspired the Allies with memorable speeches in their fight against the Axis Powers during World War II.

These speeches resulted from their personalities, preparation, and correspondence; and the speeches directed Allied conduct and challenged Axis aggression. The speeches examined here pertain to Lend-Lease in November, 1940-March, 1941.

The author consulted the collections of Churchill's and Roosevelt's speeches and correspondence and drew from memoirs and newspapers. The first two chapters examine Churchill and Roosevelt's rhetorical abilities; the third chapter looks at how their correspondence shaped their speeches; and the fourth ...


Interview With Gordon Weil By Andrea L’Hommedieu, Gordon L. Weil Aug 2009

Interview With Gordon Weil By Andrea L’Hommedieu, Gordon L. Weil

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Gordon Lee Weil was born March 12, 1937, in Mineola, New York, and grew up on Long Island. Sadye, his mother, worked for the Red Cross and was chairman of nursing services in Nassau County and of the USO during World War II, and she served as state president of the National Council of Jewish Women. Gordon attended Hempstead High School and Bowdoin College, where he majored in history with a concentration in government. He was on the Agriculture Committee of the 1956 Democratic Party pre-convention platform committee in Maine and served as a page at the 1956 ...


Captive To The American Woods: Sarah Wakefield And Cultural Mediation, Sophia Betsworth Hunt Aug 2009

Captive To The American Woods: Sarah Wakefield And Cultural Mediation, Sophia Betsworth Hunt

Masters Theses

The life and narrative of Sarah Wakefield, an Anglo migrant who spent six weeks as a captive of the Santee Dakotas during the US-Dakota Conflict, show one woman's experience navigating the changing racial dynamics of the nineteenth-century Minnesota frontier. Using recent conceptualizations of “the frontier” as either a middle ground or woods, this thesis reconsiders Wakefield as a prisoner, not of Indians or her own conscience but of her region‟s ossifying racial divisions. Wakefield's initial attempts at intercultural communication, which included feeding starving Dakotas who knocked on her door, were consistent with Anglo notions about womanhood and ...


Interview With Tim O’Neil By Mike Hastings, H. 'Tim' Timothy O'Neil Jun 2009

Interview With Tim O’Neil By Mike Hastings, H. 'Tim' Timothy O'Neil

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Hugh Timothy “Tim” O’Neil was born in Geneva, New York, on June 13, 1935, to Mary Ann (Perrella) and Hugh Joseph O’Neil. He grew up in Binghamton, New York, and attended Colgate University. He married while he was a student there and graduated with a major in sociology. He spent nine years working in sales for Goodyear, then moved to Maine where he worked for Noyes Tire for nineteen years. He later worked for Portland Glass, becoming the company’s president. He first met George Mitchell as a litigator on the other side of a case ...


Interview Of John J. Seydow, Ph.D., John J. Seydow, Frank Hopper Jun 2009

Interview Of John J. Seydow, Ph.D., John J. Seydow, Frank Hopper

All Oral Histories

John J. Seydow was born and raised in Olney section of Philadelphia. He was educated in Philadelphia’s Parochial School System from kindergarten through high school. He graduated from Cardinal Dougherty High School in June of 1959. He attended La Salle College on a full time basis from September 1961 through May 1965. He majored in English at La Salle and received his Bachelors degree in May of 1965. The following September he began a graduate fellowship at Ohio University where he earned his Masters and Doctorial degrees in English by May of 1968. In August 1968, he returned to ...


Interview With Harris Wofford By Brien Williams, Harris L. Wofford Jun 2009

Interview With Harris Wofford By Brien Williams, Harris L. Wofford

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Harris Llewellyn Wofford was born April 9, 1926, in New York City. He attended the University of Chicago and both Yale and Howard University Law Schools. During World War II he served in the Air Force. From 1954 to 1958 he served as an attorney for the Commission on Civil Rights, then in 1959 began teaching law at Notre Dame. He was an unofficial advisor to Martin Luther King, Jr. and an advisor to John F. Kennedy’s 1960 presidential campaign. He became Kennedy’s special assistant on civil rights and helped form the Peace Corps, serving as ...


"Real, Live Mormon Women": Understanding The Role Of Early Twentieth-Century Lds Lady Missionaries, Kelly Lelegren May 2009

"Real, Live Mormon Women": Understanding The Role Of Early Twentieth-Century Lds Lady Missionaries, Kelly Lelegren

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Missionary work has long been an important aspect of Christianity. At least as early as the 1870's, Protestant women began journeys to foreign lands to work as missionaries and teach people about Christianity, both the spiritual dimension and the lifestyle. These were primarily independent women who sought to enlarge the women's sphere from the confined, domestic life to which they were accustomed and because of its decline by the 1930's, historians have often labeled these missions as a "feminist movement."

Meanwhile, in 1898, their counterparts from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints also began filling ...


Interview With Tom Daschle By Brien Williams, Thomas 'Tom' A. Daschle Apr 2009

Interview With Tom Daschle By Brien Williams, Thomas 'Tom' A. Daschle

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Thomas Andrew Daschle was born on December 9, 1947, in Aberdeen, South Dakota, to Elizabeth B. Meier and Sebastian C. Daschle. He attended South Dakota State University, being graduated with a degree in political science in 1969. After college he served as an intelligence officer in the U.S. Air Force. He started in politics as a staff member to South Dakota Senator James Abourezk. In 1978, Daschle was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives and served for four terms there. In 1986, he ran for the U.S. Senate and won, serving until he lost ...


Growing Gardens And Nurturing Community In The Urban Environment, Katie Shaw Apr 2009

Growing Gardens And Nurturing Community In The Urban Environment, Katie Shaw

Global Studies Student Papers

The following literature will analyze how urban agriculture (UA), and more specifically community gardens, address the rising global pressures on urban areas by rebuilding local networks. First, it will present community gardening as a solution to the global food crisis. Second, five case studies will compare cities’ community garden projects throughout the world: Accra, Shanghai, St. Petersburg, Havana, and Philadelphia. The next section will study the demographics of community gardeners, especially its impacts on marginalized members of society: children, women, elderly, immigrants and ethnic minorities, and physical and mentally challenged. And finally, the issues of city planning and green design ...


Interview With Hoddy Hildreth By Mike Hastings, Horace 'Hoddy' A. Hildreth, Jr. Apr 2009

Interview With Hoddy Hildreth By Mike Hastings, Horace 'Hoddy' A. Hildreth, Jr.

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Horace “Hoddy” Hildreth was born on December 17, 1931, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to Katherine Cable Wing and Horace A. Hildreth, Sr. His father attended Bowdoin College and Harvard Law School, was Maine state senator, and later served as Maine’s governor from 1942 to 1946. His mother, Katherine Hildreth, was from the Midwest and attended Vassar College. Hoddy was graduated from Bowdoin College with a major in English and was a classmate of George Mitchell. He earned his law degree at Columbia and then returned to Maine to practice law at Pierce Atwood, where he did lobbying for ...


Interview With Carol Thompson, Marcia Monaco Apr 2009

Interview With Carol Thompson, Marcia Monaco

Chicago Anti-Apartheid Movement

Length: 91 minutes

Interview of Carol Thompson by Marcia Monaco


Historia Vol. 18, Eastern Illinois University Department Of History Apr 2009

Historia Vol. 18, Eastern Illinois University Department Of History

Historia

Historia is a joint publication of Eastern Illinois University's History Department and the Epsilon Mu Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta. Edited entirely by EIU students, Historia is designed to offer undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to publish their work. Students who wish to work as Historia editors must enroll in HIS 4900 (Historical Publishing), which is offered each spring. Students who wish to submit articles or reviews for consideration are welcome to do so at any time.

Historia earned third place in Phi Alpha Theta's Gerald D. Nash History Journal Prize competition in Division I in ...


To Die A Noble Death: Blood Sacrifice And The Legacy Of The Easter Rising And The Battle Of The Somme In Northern Ireland History, Anne L. Reeder Apr 2009

To Die A Noble Death: Blood Sacrifice And The Legacy Of The Easter Rising And The Battle Of The Somme In Northern Ireland History, Anne L. Reeder

History Honors Projects

In 1916, under the pressurized conditions of the Great War, two violent events transpired that altered the state of Anglo-Irish relations: the Easter Rising and the Battle of the Somme. These events were immediately transformed into examples of blood sacrifice for the two fundamentally opposed communities in Northern Ireland: Nationalists and Unionists. In 1969, Northern Ireland became embroiled in a civil war that lasted thirty years. The events of 1916 have been used to legitimize modern instances of violence. This paper argues, through the use of cultural texts, that such legitimization is the result of the creation of mythic histories.


Catholic Nationalism And Feminism In Twentieth-Century Ireland, Jennifer M. Donohue Apr 2009

Catholic Nationalism And Feminism In Twentieth-Century Ireland, Jennifer M. Donohue

Honors Theses

In the early 1900s, Ireland experienced a surge in nationalism as its political leanings shifted away from allegiance to the British Parliament and towards a pro-Ireland and pro-independence stance. The landscape of Ireland during this period was changed dramatically by the subversive popularity of the Irish political party, Sinn Fein, which campaigned for an Ireland for the Irish. Much of the political rhetoric surrounding this campaign alludes to the fact that Ireland was not inherently “British” because it defined itself by two unique, un-British characteristics – the Gaelic language and the Catholic faith.

As Sinn Fein’s hold on Ireland increased ...


Persephone In The River Phlegethon; Or, The Women At Gettysburg, Brenda A. Ayres Mar 2009

Persephone In The River Phlegethon; Or, The Women At Gettysburg, Brenda A. Ayres

Faculty Publications and Presentations

This paper identifies the heroic women who participated in the Battle of Gettysburg, both on the homefront and on the battlefield.


Interview With Chris Mann By Mike Hastings, Christopher 'Chris' Mann Mar 2009

Interview With Chris Mann By Mike Hastings, Christopher 'Chris' Mann

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Christopher Mann was born December 19, 1962, in Augusta, Maine. His parents were Alden and Deana Mann. His father was a Maine native who worked for the State Bureau of Banks and Banking as the director of Securities. Chris grew up in Augusta, attended Cony High School and was graduated with a degree in political science from the University of Southern Maine. He worked on Joe Brennan’s 1988 congressional campaign. After that, Mary McAleney offered him a position doing research for the state legislature. He later moved to Washington, D.C., to work in the mailroom for ...


Interview With Berl Bernhard By Brien Williams, Berl Bernhard Feb 2009

Interview With Berl Bernhard By Brien Williams, Berl Bernhard

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Berl Bernhard was born in New York City on September 7, 1929, to Morris and Celia (Nadele) Bernhard. He grew up in New Jersey, then attended Dartmouth College, graduating in 1951, and took his law degree at Yale Law School in 1954. His law career began in Washington as a law clerk to Luther Youngdahl. In the late 1950s he took a position on the Civil Rights Commission, and he was appointed staff director by John Kennedy in 1961. In 1963 he returned to private practice and in 1965 became counsel to the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee. He ...


"Good Politics Is Good Government": The Troubling History Of Mayoral Control Of The Public Schools In Twentieth-Century Chicago, James (Jim) C. Carl Feb 2009

"Good Politics Is Good Government": The Troubling History Of Mayoral Control Of The Public Schools In Twentieth-Century Chicago, James (Jim) C. Carl

Curriculum & Foundations Faculty Publications

This article looks at urban education through the vantage point of Chicago's mayors. It begins with Carter H. Harrison II (who served from 1897 to 1905 and again from 1911 to 1915) and ends with Richard M. Daley (1989 to the present), with most of the focus on four long-serving mayors: William Hale Thompson (1915--23 and 1927--31), Edward Kelly (1933--47), Richard J. Daley (1955--76), and Harold Washington (1983--87). Mayors exercised significant leverage in the Chicago Public Schools throughout the twentieth century, making the history of Chicago mayors' educational politics relevant to the contemporary trend in urban education to give ...


Interview With Sharon Sudbay By Mike Hastings, Sharon A. Sudbay Jan 2009

Interview With Sharon Sudbay By Mike Hastings, Sharon A. Sudbay

George J. Mitchell Oral History Project

Biographical Note
Sharon Sudbay was born on October 10, 1958, in Portland, Maine, to Rita Madonna Joyce and Charles Clifford Sudbay, Jr. She grew up on Munjoy Hill in Portland and graduated from Portland High School. She attended the University of New Hampshire and worked as a telephone operator throughout her college years; she was graduated with a degree in political science in 1980. She volunteered on Harold Pachios’s 1980 congressional campaign and learned FEC reporting. She worked on Joe Brennan’s 1982 gubernatorial campaign and organized fund raisers. She was hired to work for Mitchell’s 1982 campaign ...


Turn-Coats And Double-Agents In Restoration & Revolution England: The Case Of Robert Ferguson, The Plotter, Melinda S. Zook Jan 2009

Turn-Coats And Double-Agents In Restoration & Revolution England: The Case Of Robert Ferguson, The Plotter, Melinda S. Zook

Department of History Faculty Publications

The propagandist and conspirator, Robert Ferguson, so-called, The Plotter, has always been something of a puzzle to historians; his conversion from Whig to Jacobite following the Glorious Revolution has always been particularly troubling. This essay argues that Ferguson's winding career was far from unusual in the late Stuart era. Many politicians, prelates, playwrights and publicists altered their principles or even their religion within the fast changing political environment of Restoration and Revolution England. Secondly, this essay takes Ferguson seriously as a sophisticated political theorist, arguing that his political principles, from Whig to Jacobite, remained fairly consistent and revolve around ...