Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Architectural History and Criticism Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

981 Full-Text Articles 1,068 Authors 642,243 Downloads 116 Institutions

All Articles in Architectural History and Criticism

Faceted Search

981 full-text articles. Page 3 of 34.

9/11: News Media As Prism, Luka L. Murro 2022 Bard College

9/11: News Media As Prism, Luka L. Murro

Senior Projects Spring 2022

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Arts of Bard College.


“A Certain Brauch:” German-Georgian Palatine And Rhenish Immigrant Houses In Columbia County, New York And Their Vernacular Architectural Roots, Andrew J. Roberge 2022 Bard College

“A Certain Brauch:” German-Georgian Palatine And Rhenish Immigrant Houses In Columbia County, New York And Their Vernacular Architectural Roots, Andrew J. Roberge

Senior Projects Spring 2022

In this archaeological and architectural survey of 18th Century Palatine and Rhenish immigrant houses in New York's Hudson Valley, specifically in Columbia County, I track the development of three houses from their earliest vernacular forms to those touched by the Georgian influence. The Georgian worldview, stemming from European Enlightenment ideals, began permeating colonial American society in the 18th Century. It's influence first began to touch the wealthy and elite most connected with mother Europe, and then trickled into more common society. I chronicle and analyze Germantown, NY's Reformed Sanctity Church Parsonage, Germantown, NY's Simeon Rockefeller House, and Clermont, NY's "Stone …


Towards A Revised Approach To Designing From The Outside In: Contextualizing The Preliminary Proposal For The Fourth Addition To Bard College Library, Aidan Galloway 2022 Bard

Towards A Revised Approach To Designing From The Outside In: Contextualizing The Preliminary Proposal For The Fourth Addition To Bard College Library, Aidan Galloway

Senior Projects Fall 2022

Before creating the new, architects are faced with the existing. An enormous oak tree might be within the bounds of the site you’ve been hired to build a house on. Do you cut it down, or leave it? A tall brick building might be next door. Do you imitate its scale, its materiality, its style, or do you create something that looks entirely different?

These kinds of questions, while perhaps always fundamental to architecture, were especially pertinent in mid-to-late-twentieth century debates surrounding “context” as architects like Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown challenged the conventions of “orthodox” Modern architecture. “Frank …


Mosque Architecture And Identity: A Study Of The Autochthonous Mosque In China, Yutong Ma 2021 Washington University in St. Louis

Mosque Architecture And Identity: A Study Of The Autochthonous Mosque In China, Yutong Ma

Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design Theses & Dissertations

This thesis argues that an autochthonous mosque architecture exists in China, and this historical type adequately serves as a reference for contemporary mosque building in southeastern China in light of how it responded to the Chinese cultural and urban contexts. Many Hui Muslims and architects in this region refuse to consider historical mosque architecture built in traditional Chinese architectural style as their cultural references in constructing new mosques, as they believe that the traditional Chinese architectural language is insufficient to express their identity as Muslims. Instead, they prefer a collection of symbolic architectural elements to be used in mosque architecture …


Timber Constructed: Towards An Alternative Material History, Laila Seewang, Irina Davidovici 2021 Portland State University

Timber Constructed: Towards An Alternative Material History, Laila Seewang, Irina Davidovici

School of Architecture Faculty Publication and Presentations

Editorial:

This issue of Architectural Theory Review proposes an alternative intellectual history of timber architecture. It foregrounds the relationships that tie the natural resource to the cultural artefact, its processing into construction material and, with it, the production of associated disciplinary expertise. The essays explore the spatial and symbolic possibilities of timber in historical and contemporary discourse by highlighting its simultaneity as cultural artefact, material commodity, environmental resource, and structural element. Thus, the material’s appearance and representation are positioned within perennial oscillations between globalism and locality, natural and man-made, industry and craft, innovation and tradition, material and ideology, modernity and …


Les Jardins « Du Climat De L’Oranger » : Jean Claude Nicolas Forestier (1861-1930), Traditions Méditerranéennes Et Jardin À La Française, Camille Lesouef 2021 Universite Pantheon-Sorbonne (Paris I)

Les Jardins « Du Climat De L’Oranger » : Jean Claude Nicolas Forestier (1861-1930), Traditions Méditerranéennes Et Jardin À La Française, Camille Lesouef

Artl@s Bulletin

Dans l’ouvrage Jardins : carnet de plans et de dessins (1920), le paysagiste J. C. N. Forestier forge la typologie des jardins « du climat de l’oranger » qui réunit des traditions hortésiennes de différents horizons historiques et géographiques (gréco-romaine, arabo-andalouse, maghrébine, italienne). Cet article se propose d’étudier la vision de la méditerranéité qui émane de cette typologie, puis de la mettre en perspective avec le modèle du jardin moderne élaboré par le paysagiste dès le début du siècle. Il s’agit de mettre en lumière la façon dont l’imaginaire de la Méditerranée inspire le renouvellement de l’art des jardins au …


Mud Architecture In Hadhramout Valley And Its Suitability To The Environment, Mishael Ahmed Sheban, Mohammed Abdellah Al-Saggaf 2021 College of Engineering & Petroleum, Hadhramout University

Mud Architecture In Hadhramout Valley And Its Suitability To The Environment, Mishael Ahmed Sheban, Mohammed Abdellah Al-Saggaf

Hadhramout University Journal of Natural & Applied Sciences

Mud architecture in Hadhramout Valley is the dominant local architecture, which has been illustrated in the construction of magnificent residential buildings and palaces at intervals of time since the settlement began in the valley. The environment in Hadhramout Valley is characterized by the availability of mud material deposited in the streams of the valley and its sub-valleys. The prevailing climate is the dry hot climate. Mud buildings confirm the suitability of clay material for construction, which has been favored by ancestors since ancient times. The physo-thermal properties of clay are different from other natural materials. Mud buildings provide adequate thermal …


Dcamm And Capital Stewardship, Sarah Felton 2021 Massachusetts Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance

Dcamm And Capital Stewardship, Sarah Felton

UMassBRUT Community

Created in 1980, the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (DCAMM) manages some 68 million square feet of building space for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. This talk focuses on some of the challenges DCAMM faces in managing these facilities at the state's higher education institutions where 74% of the building portfolio were built prior to 1981. After discussing the Commonwealth's priorities in Capital Investment, the talk concludes with a look at DCAMM-funded renovations to the Claire T. Carney Library and Science and Engineering Building at UMass Dartmouth.


Towards Civic Brutalism, Daniel Abramson 2021 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Towards Civic Brutalism, Daniel Abramson

UMassBRUT Community

1960s Massachusetts was a Brutalist mecca, much of it with civic dimensions, mediating through architecture citizens' rights and identities. The expanded welfare state's administration in Massachusetts was consolidated in new buildings for federal, state, and municipal workers in Boston's Government Center, a top-down urban renewal process. Government Center's buildings, including Boston City Hall and the Massachusetts State Service Center, embodied Brutalist values of material integrity, monumentality, and abstraction. Little thought was given to the architecture's civic dimensions, how people would engage politically with each other and the state. Subsequently, City Hall Plaza functioned for decades as eastern Massachusetts' civic fairground, …


Brutal Realities, Mark Pasnik 2021 Wentworth Institute of Technology

Brutal Realities, Mark Pasnik

UMassBRUT Community

This presentation examines the changing tide around the reception of Brutalism in the United States during the last decade, while questioning how that change will impact our treatment of concrete buildings in the future. As concrete modernism comes into more positive focus today, will attitudes toward the future of these buildings in the architecture and preservation communities readjust? Should such structures be preserved or conserved, adapted or transformed? And how important is it to be responsive to original intentions and elements of significance? A conservation management plan for Boston City Hall is presented as a case study in which careful …


Umass Dartmouth Science And Engineering (Seng) Building Systems Upgrades Project, Jillian Cornelius 2021 Ellenzweig

Umass Dartmouth Science And Engineering (Seng) Building Systems Upgrades Project, Jillian Cornelius

UMassBRUT Community

Although UMass Dartmouth's Science and Engineering Building has long been viewed as an architectural treasure, its aging interior and structure have presented some challenges to users nearly 50 years after it opened. This talk examines Ellenzweig's extensive retrofitting of the UMass Dartmouth SENG building for accessibility, a new envelope, updated MEP, and fire-safety measures. After looking at the design phase and interactions with the Mass Historic Commission, the talk ends with an examination of the replacement of windows in the building.


Concrete Deterioration And Diagnosis, Matthew B. Bronski 2021 Simpson Gumpertz & Heger

Concrete Deterioration And Diagnosis, Matthew B. Bronski

UMassBRUT Community

Built primarily in the 1960’s, mid-century modernist concrete buildings are now at the age when we regard many as historic or architecturally significant (and thus as deserving of careful restoration and stewardship), but also at an age where many now exhibit significant deterioration. In this presentation, Matthew Bronski describes the most common maladies and deterioration mechanisms that can befall exposed concrete facades, outlines investigative and diagnostic approaches, and discuss the pros and cons of different rehabilitation treatment options, and the importance of tailoring the treatment to the malady.


Concrete Conservation Strategies And Repair, Paul Gaudette 2021 Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates

Concrete Conservation Strategies And Repair, Paul Gaudette

UMassBRUT Community

Drawing on the speaker's many years in the field, this talk gives a comprehensive overview of concrete conservation. Beginning with the goals and approaches to conserving concrete, the talk then covers common protection systems, petrographic and chemical studies, and the design of mixes used in repairs. In order to demonstrate these techniques, two case studies are examined, including a Brutalist building and building with architectural precast. The talk ends with some recommendations on how to best approach cleaning and conservation of historic concrete buildings.


Approaches To Renewing Brutalist-Era Lab Buildings, Jean Caroon 2021 Goody Clancy

Approaches To Renewing Brutalist-Era Lab Buildings, Jean Caroon

UMassBRUT Community

Given the immense amount of embodied carbon that mid-century Brutalist structures represent, we must redirect our focus from demolishing these concrete structures to renovating them to fit our needs in the 21st century. Higher education laboratory buildings from the 1960s and 1970s are a particularly challenging type of facility. This talk describes the work that Boston architecture firm Goody Clancy has recently undertaken in renovating over 1 million square feet of lab building space. The talk not only covers specific retrofits and envelope improvements to science buildings, such as the Gant Science Complex at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, …


Humanizing The Brutalist Interior: The Renovation Of Paul Rudolph's Claire T. Carney Library At Umass Dartmouth, Kelly Haigh, Ben Youtz 2021 designLAB Architects

Humanizing The Brutalist Interior: The Renovation Of Paul Rudolph's Claire T. Carney Library At Umass Dartmouth, Kelly Haigh, Ben Youtz

UMassBRUT Community

Members of the team that worked on the renovation of the Claire T. Carney Library, designed by Paul Rudolph and completed in 1972, share their design solutions for maintaining the integrity of the architecture and fostering an interior that is welcoming of its occupants. Discussions focus on interior attributes, human occupants, color, light and texture as approaches to humanize the massive concrete attributes that are notorious of Brutalist structures.


Humanizing The Brutalist Interior: Inspiration. Collaboration. Transformation, Leslie Saul 2021 Leslie Saul & Associates

Humanizing The Brutalist Interior: Inspiration. Collaboration. Transformation, Leslie Saul

UMassBRUT Community

This talk covers the process behind the design of the fabric and textiles that were added to UMass Dartmouth's iconic Claire T. Carney Library during a $48 million dollar renovation of the Paul Rudolph building, completed in 2012. Interior Designer, Leslie Saul, describes how she drew inspiration from both UMass Dartmouth's genesis as a textile college and Rudolph’s original color palette to create eye-catching interior furniture and carpets in order to humanize this particular Brutalist interior.


Beholding Brutalism: A Cultural Landscape View, Elaine Stiles 2021 Roger Williams University

Beholding Brutalism: A Cultural Landscape View, Elaine Stiles

UMassBRUT Community

This talk looks at the complexities of how we encounter monumental concrete not as art objects, but as elements of the cultural landscape with social meanings, relationships, and stories encoded into their spaces. This socially-driven approach rooted in historic and cultural context, renders fuller biographies of these places than aesthetics alone, and also enriches thinking about the futures of these monumental places.


Notes Towards A History Of The Brutalist Landscape, Marisa Angell Brown 2021 Rhode Island School of Design

Notes Towards A History Of The Brutalist Landscape, Marisa Angell Brown

UMassBRUT Community

When we talk about Brutalism, we are generally talking about architecture. Is there such a thing as the Brutalist landscape? If so, what defines it, and who are its practitioners? How does the Brutalist landscape navigate the relationship between plantings, hardscape and public art? What is it designed to do, and for whom? If the Brutalist landscape exists as a category, was it successful? Is the history of its public reception different from the reception of Brutalist architecture? This presentation lays out notes towards a history of the Brutalist landscape, considering the work of Bertrand Goldberg, M. Paul Friedberg, Lawrence …


Umass Brut: Re-Imagining The Plinth, John Amodeo 2021 IBI Group

Umass Brut: Re-Imagining The Plinth, John Amodeo

UMassBRUT Community

Modeled on UVA’s Lawn, Paul Rudolph’s mid-century Brutalist UMass Dartmouth buildings march down both sides of a gently sloped great lawn following the grade with one exception, the Auditorium, which is raised above the quad’s lawn on a 6’ high plinth, accessed by monumental stairs underscoring the entire building. With its entries elusively tucked into the ends of the building, the Auditorium steps were ceremonial at best and vacant, functionless and windswept at worst.

Evolving tastes, priorities and social behavior over subsequent decades, and even more recently, the pandemic, have made indoor/outdoor relationships, outdoor space, and universal access a top …


Teaching Brutalist Architecture On Campus, Lydia Brandt 2021 University of South Carolina

Teaching Brutalist Architecture On Campus, Lydia Brandt

UMassBRUT Community

Modern architecture on campus--especially of the Brutalist variety--provides ample opportunities to introduce and analyze the history of twentieth-century architecture with college students. This talk presents strategies for documenting, teaching, and advocating with modern architecture on American college campuses using the speaker's work at the University of South Carolina as a case study.


Digital Commons powered by bepress