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Disability and Equity in Education Commons

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2115 full-text articles. Page 1 of 66.

Coda, Gail M. Boldt 2016 Penn State University

Coda, Gail M. Boldt

Occasional Paper Series

No abstract provided.


Flip The Script, Kevin K. Kumashiro, Erica Meiners 2016 University of San Francisco

Flip The Script, Kevin K. Kumashiro, Erica Meiners

Occasional Paper Series

"Each one of us must understand education reform as inseparable from our concurrent struggles in other sectors, including labor and healthcare, and the movements to secure full human and civil rights for all." --Authors.


A Glass Half Full, Jeffrey M. R. Duncan-Andrade 2016 San Francisco State University

A Glass Half Full, Jeffrey M. R. Duncan-Andrade

Occasional Paper Series

Presents a vision for remaking ourselves as a society by addressing the basic needs of all children and defining, assessing, and developing high quality teaching.


Creating The Schools We Need, Pedro Noguera 2016 New York University

Creating The Schools We Need, Pedro Noguera

Occasional Paper Series

The struggle for education remains vital to the struggle for democracy, equality and justice. The only question is who will align themselves with those who must be integral to making this possibility a reality.


Educational Revolution, Peter Taubman 2016 Brooklyn College

Educational Revolution, Peter Taubman

Occasional Paper Series

Invites the reader to reclaim the conversation and turn back the on-going privatization and corporatization of public schools.


From Access To Interaction, Daniel Atkins 2016 Bank Street College of Education

From Access To Interaction, Daniel Atkins

Occasional Paper Series

Atkins calls on educators to see beyond access to identify “core moments” for child-centered experiential learning in inclusion classrooms. He warns that “[t]he process of scaffolding the child’s inclusion in the activities or interactions of the day can too often become conflated or confused with the process of scaffolding the child’s physical ability to gain access to those activities or interactions.”


Overcoming Barriers To Coteaching, Seamus O'Connor 2016 Alexandria Public Schools

Overcoming Barriers To Coteaching, Seamus O'Connor

Occasional Paper Series

Seamus O’Connor, a high school special education teacher, shares a story of bridging a divide. He takes a clear and honest look at the evolution of his relationship with his coteaching partner, Carol. In doing so, he explores themes of equity, trust, and negotiated differences in building a collaborative classroom.


Doing The Civil Right Thing: Supporting Children With Disabilities In Inclusive Classrooms, David J. Connor, Kristen Goldmansour 2016 Hunter College, City University of New York

Doing The Civil Right Thing: Supporting Children With Disabilities In Inclusive Classrooms, David J. Connor, Kristen Goldmansour

Occasional Paper Series

David J. Connor and Kristen Goldmansour explore cotaught inclusion classrooms through the lens of the social justice narrative. They write about the parents who asserted “that it was their children’s civil right to be educated within a diverse classroom, one that truly mirrored the nation’s population.” They critique the alternative to inclusion as “segregation,” which results in “devaluation, a loss in cultural capital for individuals” and argue that cotaught classrooms can upend “artificial notions of ‘normalcy’ that have served to diminish and devalue ‘disabled’ children.”


Inclusion: What Came Before, Judith Lesch 2016 Bank Street College of Education

Inclusion: What Came Before, Judith Lesch

Occasional Paper Series

Judith Lesch’s firsthand account of her teaching experiences from the late 1970s through the mid-1990s takes us on a journey through the evolving approaches to inclusion.


Front Matter And Introduction, Valentine Burr 2016 Bank Street College of Education

Front Matter And Introduction, Valentine Burr

Occasional Paper Series

The writers in this issue of Occasional Papers advocate for models of inclusion that support children’s capabilities and challenge systemic inequities based on ableism and cultural biases. They examine the complex and changing nature of collaboration between general and special educators in inclusion settings. Underlying these essays, though not always explicitly stated, is recognition that the fields of special education and disability studies can deepen and inform each other.


Attitudes Toward Statistics Studies Among Students With Learning Disabilities, Orly Lipka, Itay Hess 2016 Haifa University

Attitudes Toward Statistics Studies Among Students With Learning Disabilities, Orly Lipka, Itay Hess

Numeracy

This study aims to examine the effectiveness of a support course to change attitudes toward statistics studies of post-secondary students who were diagnosed with learning disabilities (LD) and/or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The participants were 22 students in a support course that was provided over a single academic term on a weekly basis. The design of the study was according to 'Pre-Post' comparison. The effects on attitudes toward statistics were examined quantitatively and qualitatively to provide a comprehensive methodology for the research purposes. Results suggest that the weekly support course model that was taught simultaneously to the on-line ...


Final Report 2015 National Summit: Early Childhood Special Education Inclusion, Diana J. LaRocco, Erin E. Barton 2016 Goodwin College

Final Report 2015 National Summit: Early Childhood Special Education Inclusion, Diana J. Larocco, Erin E. Barton

Faculty Publications

On October 7, 2015, 28 individuals representing 20 different U.S. states participated in a national, early childhood special education inclusion summit held in Atlanta, GA at DEC’s 31st Annual International Conference on Young Children with Disabilities and Their Families. Summit participants included researchers, faculty members, administrators, teachers, related services personnel, and families of children with special needs who have demonstrated leadership related to advancing preschool inclusion on the local, state, or national levels. The participants represented public and private programs and services. The summit format was a facilitated, focus group discussion in which participants shared their perceptions of ...


Delivering Disability Accommodations At A Community College: A Case Study, Caolfionn B. Yenney, Janie Sacco II 2016 University of Minnesota Twin Cities

Delivering Disability Accommodations At A Community College: A Case Study, Caolfionn B. Yenney, Janie Sacco Ii

College Student Affairs Leadership

This case study explores the Office of Disability Support Services (DSS) at Northern Midwestern Community College (NMCC). Like many state institutions of higher education, NMCC has undergone continued budgetary cuts, some of which have impacted their services. Additionally, NMCC faces limited support from administration and resistance from instructors to provide accommodations. Taking the position of the accommodations coordinator, this case study challenges readers to consider a student concern from an institutional, collaborative, student response, and strategic perspective.


Transition For Students With Disabilities: A Case Study, Brittania Schreurs, Elizabeth Chase 2016 Grand Valley State University

Transition For Students With Disabilities: A Case Study, Brittania Schreurs, Elizabeth Chase

College Student Affairs Leadership

This case study is intended to help student affairs professionals understand what their responsibilities are in assisting postsecondary students with disabilities who are facing transition issues. An overview of the K-12 and postsecondary laws are outlined to inform readers of these transition issues, particularly the responsibility of a postsecondary student to self-advocate. Information is also provided on Autism Spectrum Disorders, which are prevalent in college-aged students today. Overviews of a fictional institutional setting and disability office are provided to give context for analyzing the given case scenario. The responsibilities of key stakeholders, including the disability office, the student, the parents ...


Guggenheim For All: Museum Education For Students On The Spectrum, Chiara Di Lello 2016 Bank Street College of Education

Guggenheim For All: Museum Education For Students On The Spectrum, Chiara Di Lello

Occasional Paper Series

The aim of this paper is to articulate the strengths of Guggenheim For All (GFA) as a place-based learning experience and the ways it can benefit students on the autism spectrum. I review educator practices in light of both Universal Design for Learning principles and best practices for teaching students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and draw on anecdotal data from teachers that support a view of GFA as place-based learning.


Self-Efficacy Of Students With Visual Impairments Before And After Participation In An Inquiry-Based Camp, Kathleen Farrand, Tiffany Wild, Margilee P. Hilson 2016 Arizona State University at the Tempe Campus

Self-Efficacy Of Students With Visual Impairments Before And After Participation In An Inquiry-Based Camp, Kathleen Farrand, Tiffany Wild, Margilee P. Hilson

Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities

The purpose of this pilot study was to determine students’ self-efficacy level prior to participation and after participation in an inquiry-based science camp to determine if self-efficacy levels changed as a result of participation. A validated instrument, the 30 item Morgan-Jinks Student Self-Efficacy Scale (MJSES) (Jinks & Morgan, 1996) was used to identify the constructs of self-efficacy before and after the weeklong summer camp. The results suggest that the inquiry-based science camp had a positive impact on junior participants’ academic self-efficacy and did not increase senior participants’ academic self-efficacy.


One Child's Story Of School-Experienced Isolation And Rejection, Gloria J. Gresham Dr. 2016 Stephen F. Austin State University

One Child's Story Of School-Experienced Isolation And Rejection, Gloria J. Gresham Dr.

Journal of Multicultural Affairs

Abstract

For twelve years of school, a tiny girl endured isolation and rejection from her peers most likely due to a physical abnormality. As the girl remembers, the educators in a small, rural school district did little to support her as she was ostracized by her classmates and encourage other children to practice compassion. At times, the educators even participated in the rejection of the child. This is the story of a tiny, brown-eyed little girl who experienced isolation and rejection time and time again.

Keywords: isolation, rejection, bullying, abuse


Making Science Accessible To Students With Significant Cognitive Disabilities, Lori Andersen, Brooke Nash 2016 University of Kansas

Making Science Accessible To Students With Significant Cognitive Disabilities, Lori Andersen, Brooke Nash

Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities

The publication of A Framework for K-12 Science Education (National Research Council, 2012) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States, 2013) have created a need for new alternate content standards and alternate assessments in science that are linked to the new general education science standards. This article describes how a consortium of four states used Evidence-Centered Design (Mislevy, Steinberg, & Almond, 2003) and Universal Design for Learning (CAST, 2012) to develop alternate science content standards and assessments. A set of 43 alternate science content standards was created and an alternate assessment at each of three grade spans. Evidence that supports appropriateness of the alternate standards for students with SCD and fidelity of representation of the Framework is presented. One cycle of testlet/item development was conducted. Results of a pilot test (251 items; 1,606 students) are presented. Evidence for validity and accessibility of the alternate assessment is presented. Major findings include that the assessment items met accessibility, bias and sensitivity, and content requirements, and that students were able to understand and ...


Five Windows And A Locked Door: University Accommodation Responses To Students With Anxiety Disorders, Laura Sokal 2016 University of Winnipeg

Five Windows And A Locked Door: University Accommodation Responses To Students With Anxiety Disorders, Laura Sokal

The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Increasing enrolments of post-secondary students with disabilities are resulting in accessibility services offices reaching capacity levels. This trend has created the ‘perfect storm’ in terms of meeting these students’ needs. While collaboration between accessibility services staff and professors seems a logical solution to maximizing resource management and ameliorating this issue, additional tensions arise when issues of fairness, authority, and roles come into play. Using the constructionist model of disability as a lens, I analyzed the viewpoints of faculty members and accessibility services staff members in order to contribute to our understanding about these tensions as well as to make recommendations ...


Native American College Students: A Group Forgotten, Kristen E. Willmott, Tara Leigh Sands, Melissa Raucci, Stephanie J. Waterman 2016 University of Rochester

Native American College Students: A Group Forgotten, Kristen E. Willmott, Tara Leigh Sands, Melissa Raucci, Stephanie J. Waterman

Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs

Broadening McClellan’s (2003) study through 2011, the authors utilize qualitative content analysis of over two thousand journal articles, professional association conference programs, and reflective memos, to detail the extent to which Native American college students remain a forgotten group within the literature. The authors’ positionality and Indigenous feminist theory inform the study. The study concludes by exploring the benefits of expanded Native American college student research and the authors propose a research agenda that can guide higher education professionals to better serve the educational needs of this unique group.


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