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Disability and Equity in Education Commons

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Poverty At St. Catherine University, Louise Edwards-Simpson 2016 St. Catherine University

Poverty At St. Catherine University, Louise Edwards-Simpson

Events and Presentations

No abstract provided.


On The Expression Of Higher Mathematics In American Sign Language, John Tabak 2016 University of North Florida

On The Expression Of Higher Mathematics In American Sign Language, John Tabak

Journal of Interpretation

Abstract

The grammar and vocabulary of higher mathematics are different from the grammar and vocabulary of conversational English and conversational American Sign Language (ASL). Consequently, mathematical language presents interpreters with a unique set of challenges. This article characterizes those aspects of mathematical grammar that are peculiar to the subject. (A discussion of mathematical vocabulary and its expression in ASL can be found elsewhere (Tabak, 2014).) An increased awareness of the grammar of mathematical language will prove useful to those interpreters for the deaf and deaf mathematics professionals seeking to express higher mathematics in ASL.

In this article one will, for ...


We’Re Open Access—But Are We Accessible?, Matt Ruen, Jackie Rander 2016 Grand Valley State University

We’Re Open Access—But Are We Accessible?, Matt Ruen, Jackie Rander

Jacklyn Rander

The open access movement, from the Budapest and Berlin declarations onward, has consistently focused on removing economic and legal barriers to scholarly information. While this has increased access to research for many, it implicitly assumes that content need only be online, free, and openly licensed for everyone to have access—an assumption which neglects the barriers that may lurk within content, preventing disabled or impaired users from enjoying the same access to scholarship.

This assumption is as prevalent in library open access services as elsewhere; like many other repository teams, we have focused on recruiting content, not evaluating it. This ...


The Amandla Project, Alexander Stone 2016 SIT Graduate Institute

The Amandla Project, Alexander Stone

Capstone Collection

The Amandla Project is designed to increase the number of disabled American college students pursuing educational opportunities abroad. Incorporated as a nonprofit organization, the Amandla Project will cover all costs for accepted participants through fundraising activities, removing the financial barrier for participants. Participants will complete internships with organizations serving South Africans with disabilities, in roles that match their professional and academic goals. With educational excursions and learning activities to supplement internship experiences, the Amandla Project meets its mission while benefiting the host country and fostering leadership and advocacy skills within participants.


An Introductory Online Interactive Training To Disability Etiquette And Protocol To Promote Inclusion, David Murcko 2016 SIT Graduate Institute

An Introductory Online Interactive Training To Disability Etiquette And Protocol To Promote Inclusion, David Murcko

Capstone Collection

Study abroad is a privilege and an opportunity of a lifetime that not many individuals take full advantage of. Many factors can contribute towards a student’s decision to not study abroad, including but not limited to: finances, academic coursework, family concerns, and not being able to graduate on time. A topic rarely discussed is disclosing medical information. While the amount of students studying abroad is increasing every year, a significant amount of underrepresented minorities desire to embark on that journey of study abroad as well. Unfortunately, advisers are not always well equipped with adequate knowledge of resources. Outdated terminology ...


The Impact Of Family Autism Camp On Families And Individuals With Asd, Luchara R. Wallace 2016 Western Michigan University

The Impact Of Family Autism Camp On Families And Individuals With Asd, Luchara R. Wallace

The Qualitative Report

Families of children with disabilities, such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), often search for opportunities to acquire information about and receive emotional support from others who may have or had similar experiences. An evaluation of the Dakota Black Goose Family Autism Camp sought to determine the impact of the family camp experience. Pre- and Post-Camp surveys were administered upon families’ arrival at Camp and prior to their departure (n=17) to evaluate the overall quality of the program as well as the level of informational and emotional support anticipated and received. Follow-up interviews were completed six months post Camp to ...


No Shortcuts On The Journey To Learning For Students Or Teachers, Alison Coviello, Susan Stires 2016 PS 154, Bronx, NY

No Shortcuts On The Journey To Learning For Students Or Teachers, Alison Coviello, Susan Stires

Occasional Paper Series

Despite the generally held view that children in low-performing, under-served schools have "deficits" teachers in such schools often have very different experiences. Students can succeed in all areas of schooling and beyond. But for this to happen, teacher education institutions need to provide teacher candidates with background information and knowledge about instruction, so they can see and support the strengths of students in high-needs schools.


The Right To Learn: Preparing Early Childhood Teachers To Work In High-Need Schools, Julie Diamond, Fretta Reitzes, Betsy Grob 2016 92nd Street Y

The Right To Learn: Preparing Early Childhood Teachers To Work In High-Need Schools, Julie Diamond, Fretta Reitzes, Betsy Grob

Occasional Paper Series

Three teacher educators trained in the 1960's reflect on how to ensure educational equity in high-needs schools of today. The article starts with a description of the education the writers want for all children, and outline the processes and practices needed to sustain it. This is followed by a discussion on how schools of education can equip teachers with the values, understandings, and strategies they will need to achieve these goals.


Special Education Teachers' Beliefs And Perceptions Of Evidence-Based Reading Instruction, Loretta Jackson 2016 Liberty University

Special Education Teachers' Beliefs And Perceptions Of Evidence-Based Reading Instruction, Loretta Jackson

Doctoral Dissertations and Projects

The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study was to identify and uncover themes that emerged from special education teachers’ experiences, beliefs, and perceptions of evidence-based reading instruction. The theoretical framework that guided this study consisted of the epistemological theory of knowledge and Bandura’s social cognitive theory. Data collection methods included semistructured in-depth interviews, documentation analysis, and classroom observations. Data analyses involved reflecting on 13 special education teachers’ collective comments, dialogues, written documentation, and interview transcripts. Three themes emerged regarding the phenomenon of teaching reading to children with disabilities (a) Knowledge sources, (b) Environmental diversity, and (c) Organizational constraints. These ...


Technology-Based Family Education In Asl/English Bilingual Schools For The Deaf, Myriah L. Dixon 2016 University of New England

Technology-Based Family Education In Asl/English Bilingual Schools For The Deaf, Myriah L. Dixon

All Theses And Dissertations

More research on how ASL/English bilingual schools for the deaf educate hearing families to apply bilingual education methodology at home is warranted. Given the rising use of technology in schools, its role within these family education programs was the primary focus. Thirty-two participants from 22 different schools completed an online, researcher-developed survey. Follow-up, online interviews were conducted with 7 participants, and artifacts were collected from 10 schools. Qualitative and quantitative descriptions express the study’s results based on technology used as an informational and influential tool, counseling and coping tool, diversity tool, and program evaluation tool. Schools are using ...


We’Re Open Access—But Are We Accessible?, Matt Ruen, Jackie Rander 2016 Grand Valley State University

We’Re Open Access—But Are We Accessible?, Matt Ruen, Jackie Rander

Digital Commons + Great Lakes User Group & NY IR Day

The open access movement, from the Budapest and Berlin declarations onward, has consistently focused on removing economic and legal barriers to scholarly information. While this has increased access to research for many, it implicitly assumes that content need only be online, free, and openly licensed for everyone to have access—an assumption which neglects the barriers that may lurk within content, preventing disabled or impaired users from enjoying the same access to scholarship.

This assumption is as prevalent in library open access services as elsewhere; like many other repository teams, we have focused on recruiting content, not evaluating it. This ...


Coda, Gail M. Boldt 2016 Penn State University

Coda, Gail M. Boldt

Occasional Paper Series

No abstract provided.


Flip The Script, Kevin K. Kumashiro, Erica Meiners 2016 University of San Francisco

Flip The Script, Kevin K. Kumashiro, Erica Meiners

Occasional Paper Series

"Each one of us must understand education reform as inseparable from our concurrent struggles in other sectors, including labor and healthcare, and the movements to secure full human and civil rights for all." --Authors.


A Glass Half Full, Jeffrey M. R. Duncan-Andrade 2016 San Francisco State University

A Glass Half Full, Jeffrey M. R. Duncan-Andrade

Occasional Paper Series

Presents a vision for remaking ourselves as a society by addressing the basic needs of all children and defining, assessing, and developing high quality teaching.


Creating The Schools We Need, Pedro Noguera 2016 New York University

Creating The Schools We Need, Pedro Noguera

Occasional Paper Series

The struggle for education remains vital to the struggle for democracy, equality and justice. The only question is who will align themselves with those who must be integral to making this possibility a reality.


Educational Revolution, Peter Taubman 2016 Brooklyn College

Educational Revolution, Peter Taubman

Occasional Paper Series

Invites the reader to reclaim the conversation and turn back the on-going privatization and corporatization of public schools.


From Access To Interaction, Daniel Atkins 2016 Bank Street College of Education

From Access To Interaction, Daniel Atkins

Occasional Paper Series

Atkins calls on educators to see beyond access to identify “core moments” for child-centered experiential learning in inclusion classrooms. He warns that “[t]he process of scaffolding the child’s inclusion in the activities or interactions of the day can too often become conflated or confused with the process of scaffolding the child’s physical ability to gain access to those activities or interactions.”


Overcoming Barriers To Coteaching, Seamus O'Connor 2016 Alexandria Public Schools

Overcoming Barriers To Coteaching, Seamus O'Connor

Occasional Paper Series

Seamus O’Connor, a high school special education teacher, shares a story of bridging a divide. He takes a clear and honest look at the evolution of his relationship with his coteaching partner, Carol. In doing so, he explores themes of equity, trust, and negotiated differences in building a collaborative classroom.


Doing The Civil Right Thing: Supporting Children With Disabilities In Inclusive Classrooms, David J. Connor, Kristen Goldmansour 2016 Hunter College, City University of New York

Doing The Civil Right Thing: Supporting Children With Disabilities In Inclusive Classrooms, David J. Connor, Kristen Goldmansour

Occasional Paper Series

David J. Connor and Kristen Goldmansour explore cotaught inclusion classrooms through the lens of the social justice narrative. They write about the parents who asserted “that it was their children’s civil right to be educated within a diverse classroom, one that truly mirrored the nation’s population.” They critique the alternative to inclusion as “segregation,” which results in “devaluation, a loss in cultural capital for individuals” and argue that cotaught classrooms can upend “artificial notions of ‘normalcy’ that have served to diminish and devalue ‘disabled’ children.”


Inclusion: What Came Before, Judith Lesch 2016 Bank Street College of Education

Inclusion: What Came Before, Judith Lesch

Occasional Paper Series

Judith Lesch’s firsthand account of her teaching experiences from the late 1970s through the mid-1990s takes us on a journey through the evolving approaches to inclusion.


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