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Disability and Equity in Education Commons

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Unwanted Sexual Contact: Students With Autism And Other Disabilities At Greater Risk, Kirsten R. Brown, Edlyn V. Pena, Susan R. Rankin 2016 California Lutheran University

Unwanted Sexual Contact: Students With Autism And Other Disabilities At Greater Risk, Kirsten R. Brown, Edlyn V. Pena, Susan R. Rankin

Kirsten R. Brown, Ph.D.

The limited literature on sexual assault and unwanted sexual contact indicates that students with disabilities, and specifically students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), are an at risk population. This study uses data from a multi-institution climate assessment to examine the prevalence of unwanted sexual contact. Findings indicate that students with non-ASD disabilities and students with ASD were twice as likely to report unwanted sexual contact, than their non-disabled peers were. Women students with ASD are particularly at risk. Implications for postsecondary institutions, recommendations for student affairs professionals, and areas for future research are discussed. 


Across Classrooms: School Quality Reviews As A Progressive Educational Policy, Doug Knecht, Nancy Gannon, Carolyn Yaffe 2016 Bank Street College of Education

Across Classrooms: School Quality Reviews As A Progressive Educational Policy, Doug Knecht, Nancy Gannon, Carolyn Yaffe

Occasional Paper Series

Knecht, Gannon, and Yaffe, former New York Department of Education administrators, describe their work adding a quality review process to the accountability system for city schools. Positing that the quality review is itself a progressive process, they argue that it can help schools to focus more on the lived experiences of their students and less on high stakes moments.


A Humanizing Approach To Improving School Disciplinary Culture, Darrick Smith 2016 University of San Francisco

A Humanizing Approach To Improving School Disciplinary Culture, Darrick Smith

Occasional Paper Series

Smith summarizes efforts to transform the negative and disrespectful culture at a small California high school with a racially diverse student population. Here a humanizing approach to discipline, rooted in an affirmation of students and their families, and entailing an alignment of school and family values with the school’s mission, has been successful.


Say That The River Turns: Social Justice Intentions In Progressive Public School Classrooms, Beatrice Fennimore 2016 Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Say That The River Turns: Social Justice Intentions In Progressive Public School Classrooms, Beatrice Fennimore

Occasional Paper Series

Fennimore confronts the deficit-based talk prevalent in many schools serving marginalized students in “Say that the River Turns.” She argues that teaching for social justice begins by replacing deficit-based talk with clearly articulated intentions that subsequently transform into actions.


Beyond Child-Centered Constructivism: A Call For Culturally Sustaining Progressive Pedagogy, Alisa Algava 2016 Bank Street College of Education

Beyond Child-Centered Constructivism: A Call For Culturally Sustaining Progressive Pedagogy, Alisa Algava

Occasional Paper Series

Algava argues that twentieth-century constructivist pedagogies are not sufficient to fulfill progressive education's inherently political, activist and democratic potential. She calls for a culturally sustaining progressive pedagogy that critically engages questions of power with both children and teachers.


Technology Invasion: Apps To Revolutionize The Diverse 21st Century Classroom. Time To Launch!, Jennifer Lesh Ph.D., Kelly Burlison Ed.D, Carmen Ronnie, Anika Smith, Nicola Gomez 2016 Lynn University

Technology Invasion: Apps To Revolutionize The Diverse 21st Century Classroom. Time To Launch!, Jennifer Lesh Ph.D., Kelly Burlison Ed.D, Carmen Ronnie, Anika Smith, Nicola Gomez

South Florida Education Research Conference

Professors of pre-service teachers are usually referred as digital immigrants, while their students are typically described as digital natives. The presentation delivered by professors and students will discuss the integration of cutting-edge technology in Higher Education classrooms. As digital immigrants, teachers and their students learn to become seasoned professionals in innovation, through the use of apps on iPads that assist with productivity, efficiency and convenience, allowing students to thrive as digital natives and meet the demands of a diverse 21st century classroom


Development Of Accessible Laboratory Experiments For Students With Visual Impairments, KC Kroes, Daniel Lefler, Aaron Schmitt, Cary A. Supalo 2016 Illinois State University

Development Of Accessible Laboratory Experiments For Students With Visual Impairments, Kc Kroes, Daniel Lefler, Aaron Schmitt, Cary A. Supalo

Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities

The hands-on laboratory experiments are frequently what spark students’ interest in science. Students who are blind or have low vision (BLV) typically do not get the same experience while participating in hands-on experiences due to accessibility. Over the course of approximately 9 months, common chemistry laboratory experiments were adapted and field tested for use in a residential school for the blind. These adaptations most commonly used a SciVoice Talking LabQuest and associated sensors, as well as other tactile methods.


On The Expression Of Higher Mathematics In American Sign Language, John Tabak 2016 University of North Florida

On The Expression Of Higher Mathematics In American Sign Language, John Tabak

Journal of Interpretation

Abstract

The grammar and vocabulary of higher mathematics are different from the grammar and vocabulary of conversational English and conversational American Sign Language (ASL). Consequently, mathematical language presents interpreters with a unique set of challenges. This article characterizes those aspects of mathematical grammar that are peculiar to the subject. (A discussion of mathematical vocabulary and its expression in ASL can be found elsewhere (Tabak, 2014).) An increased awareness of the grammar of mathematical language will prove useful to those interpreters for the deaf and deaf mathematics professionals seeking to express higher mathematics in ASL.

In this article one will, for ...


We’Re Open Access—But Are We Accessible?, Matt Ruen, Jackie Rander 2016 Grand Valley State University

We’Re Open Access—But Are We Accessible?, Matt Ruen, Jackie Rander

Jacklyn Rander

The open access movement, from the Budapest and Berlin declarations onward, has consistently focused on removing economic and legal barriers to scholarly information. While this has increased access to research for many, it implicitly assumes that content need only be online, free, and openly licensed for everyone to have access—an assumption which neglects the barriers that may lurk within content, preventing disabled or impaired users from enjoying the same access to scholarship.

This assumption is as prevalent in library open access services as elsewhere; like many other repository teams, we have focused on recruiting content, not evaluating it. This ...


The Amandla Project, Alexander Stone 2016 SIT Graduate Institute

The Amandla Project, Alexander Stone

Capstone Collection

The Amandla Project is designed to increase the number of disabled American college students pursuing educational opportunities abroad. Incorporated as a nonprofit organization, the Amandla Project will cover all costs for accepted participants through fundraising activities, removing the financial barrier for participants. Participants will complete internships with organizations serving South Africans with disabilities, in roles that match their professional and academic goals. With educational excursions and learning activities to supplement internship experiences, the Amandla Project meets its mission while benefiting the host country and fostering leadership and advocacy skills within participants.


An Introductory Online Interactive Training To Disability Etiquette And Protocol To Promote Inclusion, David Murcko 2016 SIT Graduate Institute

An Introductory Online Interactive Training To Disability Etiquette And Protocol To Promote Inclusion, David Murcko

Capstone Collection

Study abroad is a privilege and an opportunity of a lifetime that not many individuals take full advantage of. Many factors can contribute towards a student’s decision to not study abroad, including but not limited to: finances, academic coursework, family concerns, and not being able to graduate on time. A topic rarely discussed is disclosing medical information. While the amount of students studying abroad is increasing every year, a significant amount of underrepresented minorities desire to embark on that journey of study abroad as well. Unfortunately, advisers are not always well equipped with adequate knowledge of resources. Outdated terminology ...


The Impact Of Family Autism Camp On Families And Individuals With Asd, Luchara R. Wallace 2016 Western Michigan University

The Impact Of Family Autism Camp On Families And Individuals With Asd, Luchara R. Wallace

The Qualitative Report

Families of children with disabilities, such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), often search for opportunities to acquire information about and receive emotional support from others who may have or had similar experiences. An evaluation of the Dakota Black Goose Family Autism Camp sought to determine the impact of the family camp experience. Pre- and Post-Camp surveys were administered upon families’ arrival at Camp and prior to their departure (n=17) to evaluate the overall quality of the program as well as the level of informational and emotional support anticipated and received. Follow-up interviews were completed six months post Camp to ...


No Shortcuts On The Journey To Learning For Students Or Teachers, Alison Coviello, Susan Stires 2016 PS 154, Bronx, NY

No Shortcuts On The Journey To Learning For Students Or Teachers, Alison Coviello, Susan Stires

Occasional Paper Series

Despite the generally held view that children in low-performing, under-served schools have "deficits" teachers in such schools often have very different experiences. Students can succeed in all areas of schooling and beyond. But for this to happen, teacher education institutions need to provide teacher candidates with background information and knowledge about instruction, so they can see and support the strengths of students in high-needs schools.


The Right To Learn: Preparing Early Childhood Teachers To Work In High-Need Schools, Julie Diamond, Fretta Reitzes, Betsy Grob 2016 92nd Street Y

The Right To Learn: Preparing Early Childhood Teachers To Work In High-Need Schools, Julie Diamond, Fretta Reitzes, Betsy Grob

Occasional Paper Series

Three teacher educators trained in the 1960's reflect on how to ensure educational equity in high-needs schools of today. The article starts with a description of the education the writers want for all children, and outline the processes and practices needed to sustain it. This is followed by a discussion on how schools of education can equip teachers with the values, understandings, and strategies they will need to achieve these goals.


Technology-Based Family Education In Asl/English Bilingual Schools For The Deaf, Myriah L. Dixon 2016 University of New England

Technology-Based Family Education In Asl/English Bilingual Schools For The Deaf, Myriah L. Dixon

All Theses And Dissertations

More research on how ASL/English bilingual schools for the deaf educate hearing families to apply bilingual education methodology at home is warranted. Given the rising use of technology in schools, its role within these family education programs was the primary focus. Thirty-two participants from 22 different schools completed an online, researcher-developed survey. Follow-up, online interviews were conducted with 7 participants, and artifacts were collected from 10 schools. Qualitative and quantitative descriptions express the study’s results based on technology used as an informational and influential tool, counseling and coping tool, diversity tool, and program evaluation tool. Schools are using ...


Special Education Teachers' Beliefs And Perceptions Of Evidence-Based Reading Instruction, Loretta Jackson 2016 Liberty University

Special Education Teachers' Beliefs And Perceptions Of Evidence-Based Reading Instruction, Loretta Jackson

Doctoral Dissertations and Projects

The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study was to identify and uncover themes that emerged from special education teachers’ experiences, beliefs, and perceptions of evidence-based reading instruction. The theoretical framework that guided this study consisted of the epistemological theory of knowledge and Bandura’s social cognitive theory. Data collection methods included semistructured in-depth interviews, documentation analysis, and classroom observations. Data analyses involved reflecting on 13 special education teachers’ collective comments, dialogues, written documentation, and interview transcripts. Three themes emerged regarding the phenomenon of teaching reading to children with disabilities (a) Knowledge sources, (b) Environmental diversity, and (c) Organizational constraints. These ...


Let's Keep In Touch : Conversations About Access And Tactility., Whitney E. B. Mashburn 2016 University of Louisville

Let's Keep In Touch : Conversations About Access And Tactility., Whitney E. B. Mashburn

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Let’s Keep in Touch: Conversations about Tactility, a project collaboratively organized by social practice artist Carmen Papalia and curator Whitney Mashburn, presents conversations between Papalia and artists selected by Mashburn, in regard to tactile access of the chosen artists’ works. The project aims to challenge visual biases in museum engagement, through dialogue with living artists.

Carmen Papalia takes social practice in a new direction as he applies it to the topic of accessibility. Using the tool of conversation, he creates strategic infrastructural activism and prompts exploration of non-visual perception.

In this thesis, Papalia’s work will be examined and ...


We’Re Open Access—But Are We Accessible?, Matt Ruen, Jackie Rander 2016 Grand Valley State University

We’Re Open Access—But Are We Accessible?, Matt Ruen, Jackie Rander

Digital Commons + Great Lakes User Group & NY IR Day

The open access movement, from the Budapest and Berlin declarations onward, has consistently focused on removing economic and legal barriers to scholarly information. While this has increased access to research for many, it implicitly assumes that content need only be online, free, and openly licensed for everyone to have access—an assumption which neglects the barriers that may lurk within content, preventing disabled or impaired users from enjoying the same access to scholarship.

This assumption is as prevalent in library open access services as elsewhere; like many other repository teams, we have focused on recruiting content, not evaluating it. This ...


Coda, Gail M. Boldt 2016 Penn State University

Coda, Gail M. Boldt

Occasional Paper Series

No abstract provided.


Flip The Script, Kevin K. Kumashiro, Erica Meiners 2016 University of San Francisco

Flip The Script, Kevin K. Kumashiro, Erica Meiners

Occasional Paper Series

"Each one of us must understand education reform as inseparable from our concurrent struggles in other sectors, including labor and healthcare, and the movements to secure full human and civil rights for all." --Authors.


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