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Disability and Equity in Education Commons

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Student Voice: The Beacon In Our Journey To School Improvement, Yolanda Stanislaus, Helen J. Webster, Beth W. Hester 2017 Montgomery County Public Schools

Student Voice: The Beacon In Our Journey To School Improvement, Yolanda Stanislaus, Helen J. Webster, Beth W. Hester

National Youth-At-Risk Conference Savannah

Is it possible to reduce the achievement gap simply by implementing effective instructional practices? Francis Scott Key Middle School in Montgomery County Maryland learned that building the cultural proficiency of teachers had to move beyond strategies. Francis Scott Key’s Student Voice Project helped both teachers and students transform their thinking about instruction, communication, and school improvement.


Teaching Sweet (Students Who Have Experienced Extreme Trauma), Mavis J. Averill 2017 Boyle Street Education Centre

Teaching Sweet (Students Who Have Experienced Extreme Trauma), Mavis J. Averill

National Youth-At-Risk Conference Savannah

High school youth who live in the inner city, many of First Nations, Metis and Inuit (FNMI) descent, have traditionally had struggles within school systems. Many have had a great deal of personal trauma in their lives. This presentation subscribes to the idea that the trauma they have experienced has affected them in a way, which compromises learning and causes students to be continually distracted from their classroom lessons. The presentation will illustrate how to work with these youth using trauma-informed teaching practices to support their emotional, behavioural, mental and spiritual well being.


Disability In Higher Education: A Social Justice Approach, Nancy Evans, Ellen Melissa Broido, Kirsten R. Brown, Autumn Wilke 2017 Bowling Green State University - Main Campus

Disability In Higher Education: A Social Justice Approach, Nancy Evans, Ellen Melissa Broido, Kirsten R. Brown, Autumn Wilke

Kirsten R. Brown, Ph.D.

Disability in Higher Education: A Social Justice Approach examines how disability is conceptualized in higher education and ways in which students, faculty, and staff with disabilities are viewed and served on college campuses. Drawing on multiple theoretical frameworks, research, and experience creating inclusive campuses, this text offers a new framework for understanding disability using a social justice lens. Many institutions focus solely on legal access and accommodation, enabling a system of exclusion and oppression. However, using principles of universal design, social justice, and other inclusive practices, campus environments can be transformed into more inclusive and equitable settings for all constituents ...


From The Co-Editors..., Todd Pagano 2017 Rochester Institute of Technology

From The Co-Editors..., Todd Pagano

Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities

No abstract provided.


A Universal Design For Robotics Education, Mustafa Şahin Bülbül 2017 Kafkas University, Kars

A Universal Design For Robotics Education, Mustafa Şahin Bülbül

Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities

In this century technological and educational needs increase drastically. Out of local language, educators need to teach robotic language and use necessary technologies to design robots like Arduino set. This set let users to know less code/computer language and knowledge about electronics. Users may develop their own robots with this set. It also improves design and implementation skills. However, it is not a suitable design for blinds. Universal design approach suggests educators to design courses in a way to meet the needs of all participants. By this approach, learning environments are helpful and useful for participants with special needs ...


Beyond Laggards And Morons: The Complicated World Of Special Education, Robert L. Osgood 2017 St. Norbert College

Beyond Laggards And Morons: The Complicated World Of Special Education, Robert L. Osgood

Education's Histories

Robert L. Osgood responds to Benjamin Kelsey Kearl's biographical approach to special education in "Of Laggards and Morons."


A Circle With Edges: How Story Time Privileges The Abled Learner, Melissa Tsuei 2017 Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

A Circle With Edges: How Story Time Privileges The Abled Learner, Melissa Tsuei

Occasional Paper Series

Takes a critical look at one of the commonplace features of early childhood classrooms—story time. In her essay, Melissa considers the ways in which story time reinforces unequal power dynamics for diverse learners by privileging the able-bodied learner. In response, Melissa creates and presents the SPHERE model, which promotes active engagement and shared dialogue through collaborative storytelling and nurtures an inclusive literacy-learning environment.


Lunch Detention: Learning From Students In Our Little Barred Room, Lisa A. Johnson 2017 Nebraska Methodist College

Lunch Detention: Learning From Students In Our Little Barred Room, Lisa A. Johnson

Occasional Paper Series

Pulls back the “facades of inclusion” to reveal emotional violence and deep-seated discriminatory practices against special education students. Lisa, herself blind, describes how she was approached by an administrator to take over the role of lunch detention supervisor for the “little barred room.” In a short time, the “little barred room” becomes a place of refuge for Lisa and the other students, who share stories of friendship and create an inclusive space that empowers them to challenge a culture of oppression.


I [Don’T] Belong Here: Narrating Inclusion At The Exclusion Of Others, Emily Clark 2017 New York City Public Schools

I [Don’T] Belong Here: Narrating Inclusion At The Exclusion Of Others, Emily Clark

Occasional Paper Series

Borrowing from narrative research and Disability Studies in Education, Emily tells the story of her adoptive siblings Maria and Isaac, who were orphaned by AIDS. She explores the paradox of inclusion which is that it sometimes, if not oftentimes, fails and results in exclusion. A chief reason for the failure of inclusion, Emily argues, is that children with real and perceived differences challenge the “grammar” of schooling—that is, they stand out for their differences.


Hitting The Switch: ¡Sí Se Puede!, Stephanie Alberto, Andrea Fonseca, Sandra J. Stein 2017 Castle Bridge Elementary School

Hitting The Switch: ¡Sí Se Puede!, Stephanie Alberto, Andrea Fonseca, Sandra J. Stein

Occasional Paper Series

Takes us into the lifeworld of first-grader Jason at Castle Bridge Elementary School, a public, dual-language school in New York City. Written by Jason’s teachers Stephanie and Andrea in conjunction with his mother Sandra, this essay puts forward the ethos ¡Sí se puede! (Yes, you can!), which relies on children’s empathy and calls for a collective response to inclusion. “Hitting the Switch” concludes with practical suggestions for creating an inclusive space for children who use assistive communicative devices so that they can become meaningful participants in the classroom community.


Talking Tolerance Inside The “Inclusive” Early Childhood Classroom, Karen Watson 2017 University of Newcastle

Talking Tolerance Inside The “Inclusive” Early Childhood Classroom, Karen Watson

Occasional Paper Series

Provides an inside look into what the Australian government calls “inclusive learning communities.” This term emerges from a national early-years learning framework that highlights ability and disability as diversity. Following the course of a six-month period in three “inclusive” early childhood classrooms, Karen offers an account of the transformative potential of inclusion in contrast to the harmful effects of teaching tolerance. Tolerance, as Karen’s study reveals, preserves the dualism of normal versus abnormal (or Other) and hinders critical reflection about ableist assumptions.


The Unfolding Of Lucas’S Story In An Inclusive Classroom: Living, Playing, And Becoming In The Social World Of Kindergarten, Haeny S. Yoon, Carmen Llerena, Emma Brooks 2017 Teachers College, Columbia University

The Unfolding Of Lucas’S Story In An Inclusive Classroom: Living, Playing, And Becoming In The Social World Of Kindergarten, Haeny S. Yoon, Carmen Llerena, Emma Brooks

Occasional Paper Series

Tells stories about a vibrant kindergartner named Lucas through the viewpoints of his mother (Emma), teacher (Carmen), and teacher-educator (Haeny). In this multi-voiced story, the narrative centers on Lucas and shifts outward toward those orbiting Lucas’s wondrously playful universe. The magic of Lucas’s unfolding story is in the ways it disrupts conventional discourses about labels, interventions, and imposed meanings of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).


Rethinking "Those Kids" : Lessons Learned From A Novice Teacher's Induction Into In/Exclusion, Louis Olander 2017 Hunter College, City University of New York

Rethinking "Those Kids" : Lessons Learned From A Novice Teacher's Induction Into In/Exclusion, Louis Olander

Occasional Paper Series

Argues for reframing inclusionary practices as pedagogies for equity that attend to the intersectional dynamics of race, class, and disability. He also encourages more local control over the implementation of inclusionary classroom practices.


Teaching Stories: Inclusion/Exclusion And Disability Studies, Linda Ware, Natalie Hatz 2017 SUNY Geneseo

Teaching Stories: Inclusion/Exclusion And Disability Studies, Linda Ware, Natalie Hatz

Occasional Paper Series

This research considers the journey of a public school teacher (Natalie) in partnership with her former undergraduate professor (Linda) to teach disability studies to her colleagues and to her fifth grade students. Our research involved multiple components and contexts that we characterize as “Teaching Stories” to consider disability, diversity, and exclusion across settings.


Eclipsing Expectations: How A Third Grader Set His Own Goals (And Taught Us All How To Listen), Diane L. Berman, David J. Connor 2017 Hunter College

Eclipsing Expectations: How A Third Grader Set His Own Goals (And Taught Us All How To Listen), Diane L. Berman, David J. Connor

Occasional Paper Series

A description of an illuminating journey through the eyes of a parent, Diane, who wanted a more inclusive experience for her son Benny. For Diane and Benny, this meant becoming meaningful participants not only in Benny’s own classroom community but in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) meetings that determined his educational goals. David uses a DSE framework to analyze and highlight the importance of context, as opposed to focusing on the disability condition, in enacting inclusionary practices. The authors argue for an “adhocratic” model of education that views children, educators, and parents as allies.


Disability Studies In Education: Storying Our Way To Inclusion, Joseph M. Valente, Scot Danforth 2017 Penn State University

Disability Studies In Education: Storying Our Way To Inclusion, Joseph M. Valente, Scot Danforth

Occasional Paper Series

No abstract provided.


Engaging Student Disengagement, Emily E. Calvert 2017 Germanna Community College

Engaging Student Disengagement, Emily E. Calvert

Exigence

Student disengagement is pervasive in community colleges. The Virginia Community College System serves a varied demographic that includes single parents, the disabled, minorities, and the impoverished. These unique qualities present unique challenges to keeping these students involved. Students at community college may have low self-esteem, lack purpose and encouragement, or have negative peer influences. While many students may not acknowledge this problem, VCCS takes many steps to combat it. This papers delves into the core of disengagement and examines the personal aspects of student disengagement.


The Theory Of Special Education And The Necessity Of Historicizing: A Multilogue Response To Benjamin Kelsey Kearl And Donald Warren, Jason Ellis 2017 University of British Columbia

The Theory Of Special Education And The Necessity Of Historicizing: A Multilogue Response To Benjamin Kelsey Kearl And Donald Warren, Jason Ellis

Education's Histories

Jason Ellis responds to Benjamin Kelsey Kearl and Donald Warren's discussion of the use of philosophy in the history of special education.


A Social Constructionist Inquiry Study On The Lived Experiences Of Educators With Dyslexia Overcoming Workplace Barriers And Increasing Their Capacity For Success, Kathryn R. Taylor 2017 Brandman University

A Social Constructionist Inquiry Study On The Lived Experiences Of Educators With Dyslexia Overcoming Workplace Barriers And Increasing Their Capacity For Success, Kathryn R. Taylor

Dissertations

The purpose of this qualitative research is to journey the lives of educators with dyslexia growing up as K-12 students, working in the K-12 educational environment, and the means by which those educators overcome workplace barriers as analyzed by three guidelines under the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principle, multiple means of engagement. The qualitative study was designed from a constructive inquiry perspective. This method allowed the researcher to construct reality by interpreting a group of educators’ perceptions based on their experiences and social dynamics living with dyslexia. The primary data was collected from one-on-one interviews guided by scripted questions ...


“Science Is Not My Thing”: Exploring Deaf Non-Science Majors’ Science Identities, Cara L. Gormally, Amber Marchut 2017 Gallaudet University

“Science Is Not My Thing”: Exploring Deaf Non-Science Majors’ Science Identities, Cara L. Gormally, Amber Marchut

Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities

Students who are deaf and hard-of-hearing are underrepresented in science majors, yet we know little about why. Students from other underrepresented groups in science—women and people of color—tend to highly value altruistic or communal career goals, while perceiving science as uncommunal. Research suggests that holding stereotypical conceptions about scientists and perceptions of science as uncommunal may strongly hinder recruitment into science majors. This study sought to explore the science identities of students who are deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing signers. The study focused on non-science majors in bilingual (American Sign Language and written English) biology laboratory courses. This study ...


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