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Textile Terminologies From The Orient To The Mediterranean And Europe, 1000 Bc To 1000 Ad, Salvatore Gaspa, Cécile Michel, Marie-Louise Nosch 2017 University of Copenhagen

Textile Terminologies From The Orient To The Mediterranean And Europe, 1000 Bc To 1000 Ad, Salvatore Gaspa, Cécile Michel, Marie-Louise Nosch

Zea E-Books

The papers in this volume derive from the conference on textile terminology held in June 2014 at the University of Copenhagen. Around 50 experts from the fields of Ancient History, Indo-European Studies, Semitic Philology, Assyriology, Classical Archaeology, and Terminology from twelve different countries came together at the Centre for Textile Research, to discuss textile terminology, semantic fields of clothing and technology, loan words, and developments of textile terms in Antiquity. They exchanged ideas, research results, and presented various views and methods.

This volume contains 35 chapters, divided into five sections: • Textile terminologies across the ancient Near East and the Southern ...


Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph McMullen, Kristen Carella 2017 Harvard University/Centenary University

Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph Mcmullen, Kristen Carella

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Genre Construction: The Creation Of The Dinnshenchas, Kevin Murray 2017 University College, Cork

Genre Construction: The Creation Of The Dinnshenchas, Kevin Murray

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Boring And Elusive? The Dindshenchas As A Medieval Irish Genre, Dagmar Schlüter 2017 The College at Brockport: State University of New York

Boring And Elusive? The Dindshenchas As A Medieval Irish Genre, Dagmar Schlüter

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Unique Onomastic Information In The Lebor Na Huidre Táin, Matthew Holmberg 2017 Harvard University

Unique Onomastic Information In The Lebor Na Huidre Táin, Matthew Holmberg

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Imag(In)Ing The Holy Places: A Comparison Between The Diagrams In Adomnán’S And Bede’S De Locis Sanctis, Patrick P. O'Neill 2017 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Imag(In)Ing The Holy Places: A Comparison Between The Diagrams In Adomnán’S And Bede’S De Locis Sanctis, Patrick P. O'Neill

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Preaching The Landscape In The Blickling Homilies, Danielle Cudmore 2017 Halmstad University

Preaching The Landscape In The Blickling Homilies, Danielle Cudmore

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


The Power Of Place: Colonization Of The Anglo-Saxon Landscape By Royal And Religious Ideologies, Samantha Leggett 2017 University of Cambridge

The Power Of Place: Colonization Of The Anglo-Saxon Landscape By Royal And Religious Ideologies, Samantha Leggett

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


The Origins And Identity Of Roman Mithraism, Charles R. Hill 2017 University of Nebraska Lincoln

The Origins And Identity Of Roman Mithraism, Charles R. Hill

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

This thesis is a reassessment of scholarship concerning the origins of the cult mysteries of Mithraism in its Roman form during the Imperial Period. While much has been published in the debate over the cult’s true origins, we are still left without a satisfactory answer. The present work is an attempt to reconcile some of the arguments posed in the 19th and early 20th centuries with those of the later 20th and 21st centuries, focusing mostly on the cult’s art and iconography in Mithraea, the central spaces of Mithraic worship. First will be a ...


Οὐδε Γέρων Ἀστραῖος Ἀναίνετο: The Dancing God And The Mind Of Zeus In Nonnos’ Dionysiaca, Doron Simcha Tauber 2017 Bard College

Οὐδε Γέρων Ἀστραῖος Ἀναίνετο: The Dancing God And The Mind Of Zeus In Nonnos’ Dionysiaca, Doron Simcha Tauber

Senior Projects Spring 2017

Nonnos’ Dionysiaca is designed as a revolutionary work in the epic genre, to evoke the eponymous god’s dancing energy. He has encoded a deep, pervasive structure in the poem that at once critiques the values implicit in Homeric epic and suggests that life is better lived in harmony with the rhythms of the apparently-chaotic forces in nature. Apparent chaos in Nonnos is bounded by patterns of anticipation, jarring macabre, and comically absurd resolution.


Irritating Byssus – Etymological Problems, Material Facts, And The Impact Of Mass Media, Felicitas Maeder 2017 Natural History Museum Basel, Switzerland

Irritating Byssus – Etymological Problems, Material Facts, And The Impact Of Mass Media, Felicitas Maeder

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

Byssus and sea-silk made of the fibre beard of the Pinna nobilis – zoologically called byssus – have both become subjects of scholarly interest in the last decade. The subject is discussed not only in scientific books and journals, but also in mass media around the world. Although scientific research has clarified some old misunderstandings, the double meaning of the term byssus has created new doubts and scepticism in the scholarly debate, bearing the danger of new, additional erroneous interpretations. This article recapitulates the present state of knowledge and calls attention to the consequences of assumed ‘old/new knowledge’ entering the scientific ...


Conceptualizing Greek Textile Terminologies: A Databased System, Kalliope Sarri 2017 University of Copenhagen

Conceptualizing Greek Textile Terminologies: A Databased System, Kalliope Sarri

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

One of the major challenges in costume and textile research is dealing with the vast number of terms related to textiles and garments, especially because similar terms are found in different languages and dialects, in various regions and over long periods of time, where they have survived in a complicated network of linguistic and cultural interrelations. There have been many attempts to collect textile terms in glossaries as parts of costume studies or as parts of museum archival projects. These glossaries however are usually limited to specific topics, geographical areas, languages, and time periods.

Creating a diachronic and global costume ...


The Oscillum Misunderstanding, Francesco Meo 2017 University of Salento

The Oscillum Misunderstanding, Francesco Meo

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

In this passage the Latin term oscillum refers to a particular class of objects: a small face or mask hung on trees during certain religious feasts celebrated by the Ausones in honour of Bacchus (Fig. 1). The Roman oscilla most probably derives from the Aἰῶραι, small images related to Dionysus hung on trees during the Aἰῶρα, an Athenian public feast. They were believed to purify the air as they swung in the wind. Both the Greek and the Latin words refer to objects used during particular sacred feasts, in the first case public and in the second case private, inside ...


Ordinary People’S Garments In Neo- And Late-Babylonian Sources, Luigi Malatacca 2017 University of Naples “L’Orientale”

Ordinary People’S Garments In Neo- And Late-Babylonian Sources, Luigi Malatacca

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

The investigation of textiles and clothes in ancient Mesopotamia has been anything but neglected in Assyriological studies. For the Neo- and Late Babylonian periods, in particular, two fundamental monographs have shed light on the clothes worn by the deities worshiped in lower Mesopotamia. 2 Scholars, however, have focused almost exclusively on clothing in the cultic context. This is due to a prevalence of textual sources – mostly economic or administrative documents – recording clothing items worn by divine images during festivals and rituals. Sources on the clothes worn by common people, instead, are close to non-existent. Still, we cannot overlook the fact ...


Tools And Crafts, The Terminology Of Textile Manufacturing In 1st-Millennium Bc Babylonia, Louise Quillien 2017 Université Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne

Tools And Crafts, The Terminology Of Textile Manufacturing In 1st-Millennium Bc Babylonia, Louise Quillien

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

What did sheep shears in the 1st millennium BC Babylonia look like? We are not sure. Many cuneiform texts were written about textile work in Babylonia, but it was largely about administration or accounting. There were hardly any descriptions of the actual tools and processes. In this article we go back over the words, the iconography, and the archaeology in an attempt to find these missing descriptions. This study is limited to Babylonia during the 1st millennium BC, and this period correspond to a state of the Akkadian language, called Neo-Babylonian. At these times, major evolution took place. Mesopotamia entered ...


Garments, Parts Of Garments, And Textile Techniques In The Assyrian Terminology: The Neo-Assyrian Textile Lexicon In The 1st-Millennium Bc Linguistic Context, Salvatore Gaspa 2017 University of Copenhagen

Garments, Parts Of Garments, And Textile Techniques In The Assyrian Terminology: The Neo-Assyrian Textile Lexicon In The 1st-Millennium Bc Linguistic Context, Salvatore Gaspa

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

At its political and territorial apex in the 8th and 7th centuries BC, Assyria developed into an imperial society characterised by the coexistence of languages and cultures of various origins. The policy of deporting and resettling conquered peoples across the Empire’s territory caused the spread of the Aramaic language and alphabetic script as well as the use of Aramaic as a co-official language alongside Akkadian. The linguistic change caused by these events in the Empire’s core territory emerges from the late stage of the Assyrian dialect, which shows the impact of Aramaic on various grammatical and lexical elements ...


A Diachronic View On Fulling Technology In The Mediterranean And The Ancient Near East: Tools, Raw Materials And Natural Resources For The Finishing Of Textiles, Elena Soriga 2017 University of Naples “L’Orientale”

A Diachronic View On Fulling Technology In The Mediterranean And The Ancient Near East: Tools, Raw Materials And Natural Resources For The Finishing Of Textiles, Elena Soriga

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

Among the operations required in the overall cycle of the ancient production of textiles, Greek and Roman sources refer to the fulling of woollen fabrics as the most complex and expensive technical process performed both in the 1st millennium BC and the 1st millennium AD. Indeed, the finishing of woollen clothes needed a large amount of time, energy and labour, as well as involving the use of specialized skills and costly raw materials. Fulling fulfilled two functions that were necessary for the proper finishing of cloth, namely the scouring and consolidation of the fibres in the fabric. Woven cloth straight ...


Textile Terminologies, State Of The Art And New Directions, Salvatore Gaspa, Cécile Michel, Marie-Louise Nosch 2017 University of Copenhagen

Textile Terminologies, State Of The Art And New Directions, Salvatore Gaspa, Cécile Michel, Marie-Louise Nosch

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

The first published volume dedicated to the diachronic study of ancient textile terminologies gathered contributions on Semitic and Indo- European studies based on texts dated mainly to the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC.1 It provided a rich body of data and the first steps in elaborating a methodology of how to analyse textile terminologies and technologies according to various categories. Yet, it also highlighted the problems that were encounter in such studies. For example, some areas such as Greece, Italy, Anatolia and Italy are rich in texts providing numerous textile terms but do not yield many ancient textiles, which ...


List Of Contributors, 2017 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

List Of Contributors

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

The 42 contributors include Salvatore Gaspa, Cécile Michel, Marie-Louise Nosch, Elena Soriga, Louise Quillien, Luigi Malatacca, Nahum Ben-Yehuda, Christina Katsikadeli, Orit Shamir, Agnes Korn, Georg Warning, Birgit Anette Olsen, Stella Spantidaki, Peder Flemestad, Peter Herz, Ines Bogensperger, Herbert Graßl, Mary Harlow, Berit Hildebrandt, Magdalena Öhrman, Roland Schuhmann, Kerstin Droß-Krüpe, John Peter Wild, Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert, Julia Galliker, Anne Regourd, Fiona J. L. Handley, Götz König, Miguel Ángel Andrés-Toledo, Stefan Niederreiter, Oswald Panagl, Giovanni Fanfani, Le Wang, Feng Zhao, Mari Omura, Naoko Kizawa, Maciej Szymaszek, Francesco Meo, Felicitas Maeder, Kalliope Sarri, Susanne Lervad, and Tove Engelhardt Mathiassen.


Textile Terminologies From The Orient To The Mediterranean And Europe, 1000 Bc To 1000 Ad -- Covers & Frontmatter, Salvatore Gaspa, Cécile Michel, Marie-Louise Nosch 2017 University of Copenhagen

Textile Terminologies From The Orient To The Mediterranean And Europe, 1000 Bc To 1000 Ad -- Covers & Frontmatter, Salvatore Gaspa, Cécile Michel, Marie-Louise Nosch

Textile Terminologies from the Orient to the Mediterranean and Europe, 1000 BC to 1000 AD

Front and "back" covers

Title page

Copyright page

Preface

Acknowledgements

Table of contents


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