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Tyndarus’ Bilingual Pun And The Ambiguities Of Plautus’ Captivi. (Accepted; Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

Tyndarus’ Bilingual Pun And The Ambiguities Of Plautus’ Captivi. (Accepted; Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

The article argues for a bilingual (Greek/Latin) pun at Plautus' Captivi 229-230, spoken by the principal character, Tyndarus, and places it within the context of his depiction and the generic ambiguity of the play itself.


The First Person Hortatory Subjunctive In New Comedy (Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

The First Person Hortatory Subjunctive In New Comedy (Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

ABSTRACT: Article considers patterns of usage in the type ποιῶμεν  in Menander.


Insight Into The Community: Bee Similes In The Iliad And The Aeneid, Sara Heist 2016 Liberty University

Insight Into The Community: Bee Similes In The Iliad And The Aeneid, Sara Heist

Montview Liberty University Journal of Undergraduate Research

This paper offers a comparative analysis of the bee similes in Homer’s Iliad and Virgil’s Aeneid to demonstrate that there are significant thematic connections between the similes in the two epics. In both works, bee similes illustrate the structure of the ideal society, as a close reading of each simile reveals. This paper demonstrates that both Homeric and Virgilian bee similes focus on the concept of community. In the Iliad, Homer’s first extended simile compares the Greek forces to a colony of bees. This prominent placement foreshadows the significance of bee similes in the Homeric epic. As ...


Catullan Obscenity And Modern English Translation, Tori Frances Lee 2016 Washington University in St. Louis

Catullan Obscenity And Modern English Translation, Tori Frances Lee

Arts & Sciences Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This thesis explores the ways Catullus uses obscenity in his poetry, and how modern translators captures those effects when translating obscenity into English. I first define obscenity by creating four categories of words that all have to do with taboo topics and exist only in certain contexts, outside of polite company: obscenities, technical terms, circumlocutions, and euphemisms. The first chapter analyzes Poems 16, 37, and 97, Catullus's most obscene, to show that the poet uses profanity as a literary device that gains its strength from its juxtaposition with non-obscene words. The second chapter looks at seven English translations written ...


Political Polupragmones: Busybody Athenians, Meddlesome Citizenship, And Epistemic Democracy In Classical Athens, Harry D. Rube 2016 Bowdoin College

Political Polupragmones: Busybody Athenians, Meddlesome Citizenship, And Epistemic Democracy In Classical Athens, Harry D. Rube

Honors Projects

The figure of the πολυπράγμων, the overactive, over-engaged, or meddlesome democratic citizen, is a literary trope that emerges in Classical Athenian literature in the 5th and 4th centuries B.C. This project seeks to use the πολυπράγμων as an entry point into understanding Athenian attitudes toward citizenship and socially acceptable political behaviors in Athens’ democratic era.

I explore the history and usage of the term πολυπράγμων, and the associated characteristic of πολυπραγμοσύνη (meddlesomeness), and its synonyms and antecedents. I demonstrate that to be labeled πολυπράγμων is a term of social restraint—one is named a πολυπράγμων if they ...


Dante’S Hidden Sin - Wrath: How Dante Vindictively Used The Inferno Against Contemporaries, Michael J. Rupers 2016 Dominican University of California

Dante’S Hidden Sin - Wrath: How Dante Vindictively Used The Inferno Against Contemporaries, Michael J. Rupers

Master's Theses and Capstone Projects

Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) takes his readers on a pilgrimage through what he calls the Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (ostensibly Hell, Purgatory and Heaven) in his epic poem The Divine Comedy, originally titled Commedia. This paper concentrates exclusively on Dante’s contemporaries, those people who lived during his lifetime, and examines his possible motivation for targeting enemy Ghibellines, Black Guelphs, treacherous White Guelphs, corrupt popes, and others who either crossed him or caused him trouble. He vindictively used his masterpiece to lash out at his contemporary enemies, exacting retribution against many who angered him in his lifetime or otherwise offended his ...


1st Place: "The Art Of Storytelling" Literature Collection, Lauren Cruz 2016 Chapman University

1st Place: "The Art Of Storytelling" Literature Collection, Lauren Cruz

John and Margaret Class Student Book Collection Contest

This is Lauren Cruz's submission essay, annotated bibliography, and annotated wishlist for the 2016 John and Margaret Class Student Book Collection Contest, which won first place.

Lauren is a graduate student at Chapman University in the War and Society program.


Finding The Truth: An Examination Into The Use Of Rhetoric In Thucydides, Eryn Pritchett 2016 Murray State University

Finding The Truth: An Examination Into The Use Of Rhetoric In Thucydides, Eryn Pritchett

Scholars Week

For centuries, scholars have looked to Thucydides as truth--a factual and accurate account of the Peloponnesian War--due to his thorough use of critical analysis and logical deduction. Unlike his predecessor, Herodotus, Thucydides dodged the critical and literary analysis that has plagued Herodotus for years. However, in the past few decades historians have began to realize that Thucydides is far more than facts on paper. This research project will show that Thucydides use of Athenian rhetoric transforms his work from that of historical accuracy into a "possession for all time," redefining the way other historians would construct their own narrative. (Thucydides ...


Feral And Isolated Children From Herodotus To Akbar To Hesse: Heroes, Thinkers, And Friends Of Wolves., Karl Steel 2016 Brooklyn College

Feral And Isolated Children From Herodotus To Akbar To Hesse: Heroes, Thinkers, And Friends Of Wolves., Karl Steel

Faculty Publications and Research

"In 1304, a small child of Hesse was taken by wolves, and lived with them for a while, eating well, learning to run on all fours, perhaps joining them in their raids on sheep and humans, until he was taken by hunters and forced to live, unhappily, in human society, compelled to learn to walk upright, and exhibited as a spectacle. This account, almost certainly legendary, belongs to a small set of similar stories of feral children from roughly the same time, which, unlike so many modern accounts of wild children, are not about isolation, deprivation, or a catastrophic separation ...


Taking On The Man: Female Rebellion Against Gender Roles In Classical Greek Drama, Gabrielle Killough 2016 Liberty University

Taking On The Man: Female Rebellion Against Gender Roles In Classical Greek Drama, Gabrielle Killough

Senior Honors Theses

The portrayal of women in Ancient Greek drama seems at times opposed to the societal gender roles within Classical Athens. In the plays, women are strong and dynamic figures who enact change and upheaval in their world. Ancient dramas, like Agamemnon, Medea, Antigone, and Lysistrata, portrayed women with strong autonomy and minds which matched their male counterparts; whereas the women in Classical Athens found themselves in more limited circumstances. In analyzing the nature of these disparities, it seems that the constant factor is that the plays concern the violation of the household. The female characters respond in one of two ...


Penelope’S Daughters, Barbara Dell`Abate-Çelebi 2016 Beykent University

Penelope’S Daughters, Barbara Dell`Abate-Çelebi

Zea E-Books

A feminist perspective of the myth of Penelope in Annie Leclerc’s Toi, Pénélope, Margaret Atwood’s The Penelopiad and Silvana La Spina’s Penelope.

At the origin of Western literature stands Queen Penelope—faithfully waiting for her husband to come home: keeping house, holding on to the throne, keeping the suitors at arm’s length, preserving Odysseus’ place and memory, deserted for the pursuit of war and adventures, and bringing up a son alone, but always keeping the marriage intact. Yet recently the character of Penelope, long the archetype of abandoned, faithful, submissive, passive wife, has been reinterpreted by ...


Did The Shrew Tame You: An Exploration Of Sexual Politics In Shakespeare's The Taming Of The Shrew, Marisa Stickel 2016 University of North Carolina - Wilmington

Did The Shrew Tame You: An Exploration Of Sexual Politics In Shakespeare's The Taming Of The Shrew, Marisa Stickel

SEWSA 2016 Intersectionality in the New Millennium: An Assessment of Culture, Power, and Society

This paper explores the sexual politics present in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, examining the gender roles that influence the relationship between Katherine and Petruccio. By analyzing Petruccio’s attempts at taming Katherine, in comparison to the ending of the play where she is supposedly tamed, I will emphasize Katherine's abilities to manipulate a patriarchal society’s rule over women. While she seems to demonstrate acquiescing full sovereignty to her husband, my argument will pose that Katherine assumes the role of a proper wife to trick Petruccio, allowing her access to marital dominance. By examining the patriarchal ...


America And Athens As Seen Through South Park And Aristophanes, James F. Neyer 2016 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

America And Athens As Seen Through South Park And Aristophanes, James F. Neyer

Honors Bachelor of Arts

When Dionysius the tyrant wished to be educated on the polity of Athens, Plato was said to have sent him the poetry of Aristophanes. It was through the works of Aristophanes that foreigners could learn how Athens functioned. The works of Aristophanes span 37 years, and won him multiple awards in this time. If Dionysius wished to learn about modern day America, then I think it would be best to give him the corpus of South Park. Over the course of two decades, this series has aired 267 episodes and has been consistently renewed. Though South Park does not capture ...


Challenging Kleos: An Fpda Analysis And Application Of Andromache In The Iliad, Ayana Marie Rowe 2016 Xavier University - Cincinnati

Challenging Kleos: An Fpda Analysis And Application Of Andromache In The Iliad, Ayana Marie Rowe

Honors Bachelor of Arts

I will argue that through carefully constructed language, Andromache manipulates her status as an ideal, aristocratic woman in order to critique the masculine pursuit of kleos, thereby giving a voice to women like herself who are limited as women in their ability to speak out against the societal norms. I begin my argument by establishing the parameters of an ideal, aristocratic woman in ancient Greece and demonstrating ways in which Andromache fits this characterization. The larger expanse of my thesis is then devoted to my FPDA reading of Andromache’s speeches, and the conclusions drawn from my analyses. My final ...


Girls, Girls, Girls The Prostitute In Roman New Comedy And The Pro Caelio, Nicholas R. Jannazo 2016 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

Girls, Girls, Girls The Prostitute In Roman New Comedy And The Pro Caelio, Nicholas R. Jannazo

Honors Bachelor of Arts

Prostitution is often said to be the oldest profession in the world, having occurred since the ancient times of Greece and Rome. Today’s American society views prostitution as immoral and repulsive, but this has not always been the case. In ancient Rome, Roman men were able to visit a brothel, pay for the company of a prostitute, and leave without being looked down upon or reproached, so long as they did so in moderation. If they frequently visited brothels, though, Roman men were admonished and scolded, as Cato does to a well-known gentleman after seeing him leave a brothel ...


Innovation & Hoplite Ideology: The Relation Of Martial Equipment To Ideology In Archaic And Classical Greece, William D. Henry 2016 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

Innovation & Hoplite Ideology: The Relation Of Martial Equipment To Ideology In Archaic And Classical Greece, William D. Henry

Honors Bachelor of Arts

The evidence which I present in this paper seems to suggest that there is an underlying ideology contributing to how hoplitic warfare is conducted. Further, I would argue that this ideology is more important to understanding and defining a hoplite than the definition given above. This ideology, I will argue even further, contributed to the slow adaption and evolution of the hoplitic panoply by which we now generally define hoplites. Lastly, I will discuss how this ideology changes during the period between the Archaic and Classical periods, and how this change affects the use of equipment. Therefore, there are two ...


Marriage, Honor And Religion: Three Social Constraints Challenging Women’S Lives In Miguel De Cervantes’ The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote Of La Mancha, Ovidiu Breahna 2016 John Carroll University

Marriage, Honor And Religion: Three Social Constraints Challenging Women’S Lives In Miguel De Cervantes’ The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote Of La Mancha, Ovidiu Breahna

Senior Honors Projects

No abstract provided.


The Seed Of Principate: Annona And Imperial Politics, Joseph B. Ruter III 2016 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

The Seed Of Principate: Annona And Imperial Politics, Joseph B. Ruter Iii

Honors Bachelor of Arts

From my study of the annona, I propose a new perspective on the transition between the Republic and the Principate. Each of the big three imperial historians account for the Principate in terms of personal politics and preferences of the “great man” Augustus (Div. Aug. 28; Rom. His. 52.1; Ann. 1.2). By contrast, I argue that the Principate represents the long-term political result of growing social inequality in Rome. From an equalitarian society of yodel-men farmers and shepherds in the 2nd BCE, Rome had evolved into an unequal society by the 2nd CE, where the top ...


"On Γίγνων", Faith D. McFadden 2016 Duquesne University

"On Γίγνων", Faith D. Mcfadden

Essays of Significance

Abstract for On Γίγνων

This paper will examine C.D.C Reeve’s use of ἀγάλματα as a birth metaphor in the dialogue the Symposium, and compare it to the other birth metaphors as found in the Theaetetus. This paper posits that there is a difference betwixt the ἀγάλματα found in Socrates and the διάνοια with which certain men are found to be pregnant[1]. The relationship of ἀγάλματα and διάνοια are commensurate to the relationship of διάνοια and νοήσις as found in the hierarchy of understanding in the soul in the line metaphor of the Republic.

The paper will ...


Acknowledgements/Image Credits, Molly Lynde-Recchia 2016 Western Michigan University

Acknowledgements/Image Credits, Molly Lynde-Recchia

Transference

No abstract provided.


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