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623 full-text articles. Page 1 of 19.

Tyndarus’ Bilingual Pun And The Ambiguities Of Plautus’ Captivi. (Accepted; Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

Tyndarus’ Bilingual Pun And The Ambiguities Of Plautus’ Captivi. (Accepted; Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

The article argues for a bilingual (Greek/Latin) pun at Plautus' Captivi 229-230, spoken by the principal character, Tyndarus, and places it within the context of his depiction and the generic ambiguity of the play itself.


The First Person Hortatory Subjunctive In New Comedy (Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

The First Person Hortatory Subjunctive In New Comedy (Pub. Year Tentative), Peter Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

ABSTRACT: Article considers patterns of usage in the type ποιῶμεν  in Menander.


Publication In Martial's Time And The Publication Of His Works, Jack Kaufmann 2016 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Publication In Martial's Time And The Publication Of His Works, Jack Kaufmann

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

I have attempted in this thesis to broadly discuss the nature of literary publication in classical times, characterized by (a) the lack of printing presses or any other means to make multiple copies of a work except by writing out each copy by hand, and (b) the lack of any copyright or other protection of a writer’s work. These factors led to a very different concept of publishing than our modern one. I have then focused on the epigrams of Martial (ca. 40 A.D. – 103 A.D.) in particular, because (a) his epigrams contain a wealth of information ...


Plato's Apology 17a To 35d (Uncorrected), Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

Plato's Apology 17a To 35d (Uncorrected), Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

Forensic philology for Plato's Apology 17a to 35d. Work in Progress, 211 pages. As is no warranty.


Notebook Vi Plato Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

Notebook Vi Plato Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

No abstract provided.


E. H. Campbell Bozeman Co-Op 3sept16.Png, Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

E. H. Campbell Bozeman Co-Op 3sept16.Png, Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

No abstract provided.


An Epic Hydrography: Riverine Geography In The Argonautika Of Apollonios Rhodios, Joseph R. Morgan II 2016 Washington University in St. Louis

An Epic Hydrography: Riverine Geography In The Argonautika Of Apollonios Rhodios, Joseph R. Morgan Ii

Arts & Sciences Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The literary record of the Ancient Mediterranean contains untapped potential for the study of the history of spatial representation, a new frontier in the history of geography. The articulation of spatial networks in written form is an integral element of several genres represented in the extant corpus of Greek literature. An analysis of the fabula space of an ancient narrative—the internal geography of the work itself—provides insights into the generic constraints, intertextuality, and contemporaneous geographical concepts that authors drew upon in constructing their particular literary geographies. The Argonautika of Apollonios Rhodios presents a particularly rich fabula space in ...


Poor, Pitiful Monsters From Homer To Borges, Robin McAllister 2016 Sacred Heart University

Poor, Pitiful Monsters From Homer To Borges, Robin Mcallister

English Faculty Publications

This article reviews famous monsters in Western literature that reveal a hidden humanity or affinity with the hero that elicits compassion or emphasizes their bestiality in surprising ways. Their monstrosity is often a distorted mirror image of the hero’s humanity. Shakespeare’s Caliban is a famous example of the affinity between monster and protagonist. Homer’s Polyphemus, the first monster in Western tradition establishes certain traits that persist through later literature: lawless, barbarian, cannibal, and giant. Polyphemus hates men, but loves his old ram. Grendel, Grendel’s mother, and the dragon in Beowulf are giants, lawless, cannibals. The dragon ...


"Historia Brittonum" And Britain’S Twenty-Eight Cities, Andrew Breeze 2016 Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona

"Historia Brittonum" And Britain’S Twenty-Eight Cities, Andrew Breeze

Journal of Literary Onomastics

Certain versions of the ninth-century _Historia Brittonum_ have an additional chapter (66a), nominally containing a list of "all the cities in the whole of Britain, twenty-eight in number". It has intrigued medieval and modern scholars alike. They have struggled to identify the names as those of Roman Britain's cities, for the most part without success. In the present paper a new approach is tried. While some of the places listed are genuine Roman cities (but also medieval ones), such as Winchester, Carlisle, York, London, Canterbury, or Chester, others are no such thing. They can be shown on the basis ...


“The City Was Named After An Herb Called Mesas In Ancient Spanish”: Rabbi Yosef Mesas’ Testimony Concerning His Surname, Abraham Ofir Shemesh 2016 Ariel University, Israel Heritage Department, ISRAEL

“The City Was Named After An Herb Called Mesas In Ancient Spanish”: Rabbi Yosef Mesas’ Testimony Concerning His Surname, Abraham Ofir Shemesh

Journal of Literary Onomastics

Yosef Mesas (1892–1974), a renowned Jewish Rabbi, claimed that the origin of his surname is the ancient city Mesas near Madrid, named for a medicinal herb common there. He assumes that "Mesas" became a common name in Morocco after the Jews were exiled from Spain in 1492. Mesas suggests that the herb is "Masasa" in Moroccan Arabic (Darija dialect). In the 12th century, Maimonides stated that Moroccans call the genus Plantago "Masasa". This fact refutes Mesas' assumption that the name was brought to Morocco after the Alhambra Decree.

"Mesas" apparently originates from the Spanish term "mesa", meaning "tableland" or ...


Western Classics In Modern Japan (German), Frank Jacob 2016 CUNY Queensborough Community College

Western Classics In Modern Japan (German), Frank Jacob

Publications and Research

A presentation paper (invited guest lecture) delivered at the Institute of Ancient History at Marburg University, Germany, July 12, 2016.


The Acrobatic Body In Ancient Greek Society, Jonathan R. Vickers 2016 The University of Western Ontario

The Acrobatic Body In Ancient Greek Society, Jonathan R. Vickers

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

In this thesis I collate the textual, artistic, and material evidence for acrobatics in sport and spectacle in Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic Greece, and analyze gymnastic performances with regard to their respective socio-cultural contexts. I develop the theoretical perspective that all body movement is socially qualified in order to demonstrate how the extreme manipulations of an acrobatic body carry particular social meaning: in sport, the male acrobatic body approaches superhumanism, and in spectacle the female acrobatic body approaches subhumanism. I argue, on the one hand, that men’s tumbling took place at the early Panathenaia festival in Athens, both in ...


Notebook Iv Plato Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

Notebook Iv Plato Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

No abstract provided.


Notebook Iii Plato's Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

Notebook Iii Plato's Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

No abstract provided.


Barrios-Lech_Linguistic_Interaction_Appendix_Four.Docx, Peter G. Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

Barrios-Lech_Linguistic_Interaction_Appendix_Four.Docx, Peter G. Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

Appendix 4, "Donatus on Pragmatics and Politeness," for Barrios-Lech, P. 2016. Linguistic Interaction in Roman Comedy (Cambridge).


Barrios-Lech_Linguistic_Interaction_Appendix_Five.Docx, Peter G. Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

Barrios-Lech_Linguistic_Interaction_Appendix_Five.Docx, Peter G. Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

Appendix 5, "Supplementary Material for Parts III-IV," Barrios-Lech, P. Linguistic Interaction in Roman Comedy (Cambridge).


Linguistic Interaction In Roman Comedy (Cambridge University Press, 2016), Peter G. Barrios-Lech 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

Linguistic Interaction In Roman Comedy (Cambridge University Press, 2016), Peter G. Barrios-Lech

Peter Barrios-Lech

No abstract provided.


Notebook Ii Plato's Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

Notebook Ii Plato's Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

No abstract provided.


Notebook I Plato's Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell 2016 Independent Scholar

Notebook I Plato's Apology (Work In Progress), Edward H. Campbell

Edward H Campbell

No abstract provided.


Propertius As Cantor Euphorionis In 2.1.12, Clifford Weber 2016 Selected Works

Propertius As Cantor Euphorionis In 2.1.12, Clifford Weber

Clifford Weber

No abstract provided.


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