Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Faculty Publications

Discipline
Institution
Keyword
Publication Year

Articles 1 - 30 of 135

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Fiction In The Code: Reading Legislation As Literature, Thomas J. Mcsweeney Apr 2018

Fiction In The Code: Reading Legislation As Literature, Thomas J. Mcsweeney

Faculty Publications

One of the major branches of the field of law and literature is often described as "law as literature." Scholars of law as literature examine the law using the tools of literary analysis. The scholarship in this subfield is dominated by the discussion of narrative texts: confessions, victim-impact statements, and, above all, the judicial opinion. This article will argue that we can use some of the same tools to help us understand non-narrative texts, such as law codes and statutes. Genres create expectations. We do not expect a law code to be literary. Indeed, we tend to dissociate the law ...


Léon Duguit And The Social Function Of Property In Argentina, M. C. Mirow Jan 2018

Léon Duguit And The Social Function Of Property In Argentina, M. C. Mirow

Faculty Publications

Despite its early introduction to Argentina in 1911, the doctrine of the social function of property was not quickly appropriated into the Argentine legal system. Only after a period of more than thirty-five years did this concept of property find expression in this country through the Constitution of 1949, the Peronist constitution drafted under the guidance of the Arturo Enrique Sampay. Duguit's writings formed part of a broader understanding of the social function of property that was informed by various scholars and sources, and particularly by works on Christian humanism and the social doctrine of the Roman Catholic church ...


The Canon Wars, Anita S. Krishnakumar, Victoria F. Nourse Jan 2018

The Canon Wars, Anita S. Krishnakumar, Victoria F. Nourse

Faculty Publications

Canons are taking their turn down the academic runway in ways that no one would have foretold just a decade ago. Affection for canons of construction has taken center stage in recent Supreme Court cases and in constitutional theory. Harvard Dean John Manning and originalists Will Baude and Stephen Sachs have all suggested that principles of “ordinary interpretation” including canons should inform constitutional interpretation. Given this newfound enthusiasm for canons, and their convergence in both constitutional and statutory law, it is not surprising that we now have two competing book-length treatments of the canons—one by Justice Scalia and Bryan ...


The Nuremberg Trials: A Summary Introduction, John Q. Barrett Jan 2017

The Nuremberg Trials: A Summary Introduction, John Q. Barrett

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Ahistoricism Of Legal Pluralism In International Criminal Law, James G. Stewart, Asad Kiyani Jan 2017

The Ahistoricism Of Legal Pluralism In International Criminal Law, James G. Stewart, Asad Kiyani

Faculty Publications

International criminal law (“ICL”) is legally plural, not a single unified body of norms. As a whole, trials for international crimes involve a complex dance between international and domestic criminal law, the specificities of which vary markedly from one forum to the next. To date, many excellent scholars have suggested that the resulting doctrinal diversity in ICL should be tolerated and managed under the banner of Legal Pluralism. To our minds, these scholars omit a piece of the puzzle that has major implications for their theory – the law’s history. Neglecting the historical context of the international and national criminal ...


The History Of The Florida Supreme Court, M C. Mirow Jan 2017

The History Of The Florida Supreme Court, M C. Mirow

Faculty Publications

This article describes the challenges to writing the history of Florida's colonial courts in the Spanish and British periods from 1513 to 1821. These courts are an important yet understudied aspect of Florida legal history.


Property And Sovereignty: An Indian Reserve And A Canadian City, Douglas C. Harris Jan 2017

Property And Sovereignty: An Indian Reserve And A Canadian City, Douglas C. Harris

Faculty Publications

Property rights, wrote Morris Cohen in 1927, are delegations of sovereign power. They are created by the state and operate to establish limits on its power. As such, the allocation of property rights is an exercise of sovereignty and a limited delegation of it. Sixty years later, Joseph Singer used Cohen’s conceptual framing in a critical review of developments in American Indian law. Where the US Supreme Court had the opportunity to label an American Indian interest as either a sovereign interest or a property interest, he argued, it invariably chose to the disadvantage of the Indians. Within Canada ...


Progressive Era Conceptions Of The Corporation And The Failure Of The Federal Chartering Movement, Camden Hutchison Jan 2017

Progressive Era Conceptions Of The Corporation And The Failure Of The Federal Chartering Movement, Camden Hutchison

Faculty Publications

Despite the economic integration of the several states and the broad regulatory authority of the federal government, the internal affairs of business corporations remain primarily governed by state law. The origins of this system are closely tied to the decentralized history of the United States, but the reasons for its continued persistence—in the face of significant federalization pressures—are not obvious. Indeed, federalization of corporate law was a major political goal during the Progressive Era, a period which witnessed significant expansion of federal involvement in the national economy. By examining the historical record of Progressive Era policy debates, this ...


Law And Economics Scholarship And Supreme Court Antitrust Jurisprudence, 1950–2010, Camden Hutchison Jan 2017

Law And Economics Scholarship And Supreme Court Antitrust Jurisprudence, 1950–2010, Camden Hutchison

Faculty Publications

Although law and economics has influenced nearly every area of American law, few have been as deeply and as thoroughly "economized" as antitrust. Beginning in the 1970s, antitrust law—traditionally informed by populist hostility to economic concentration—was dramatically transformed by a new and overriding focus on economic efficiency. This transformation was associated with a provocative new wave of antitrust scholarship, which claimed that economic efficiency (or "consumer welfare") was the sole legitimate aim of antitrust policy. The U.S. Supreme Court seemingly agreed, issuing decision after decision rejecting traditional antitrust values and adopting the efficiency norm of the law ...


Symposium Introduction: Beyond The Faa: Arbitration Procedure, Practice, And Policy In Historical Perspective, Carli N. Conklin Apr 2016

Symposium Introduction: Beyond The Faa: Arbitration Procedure, Practice, And Policy In Historical Perspective, Carli N. Conklin

Faculty Publications

The Federal Arbitration Act (FAA), enacted in 1925, provides a framework for how we think about arbitration procedure, practice, and policy in the United States today. Yet, the FAA, and the interpretive lens it provides, are relatively new on the horizon, historically speaking


Creating A Literature For The King’S Courts In The Later Thirteenth Century: Hengham Magna, Fet Asaver, And Bracton, Thomas J. Mcsweeney Mar 2016

Creating A Literature For The King’S Courts In The Later Thirteenth Century: Hengham Magna, Fet Asaver, And Bracton, Thomas J. Mcsweeney

Faculty Publications

The early common law produced a rich literature. This article examines two of the most popular legal treatises of the second half of the thirteenth century, Hengham Magna and Fet Asaver. It has long been recognized that these two treatises bear some relationship to each other. This article will attempt to establish that relationship, arguing that Hengham Magna and Fet Asaver were written by different people; that Fet Asaver borrows from Hengham Magna; and that the authors of both texts had independent access to the Bracton treatise. The article concludes by suggesting a new way to think about the legal ...


Book Review Of The Oxford History Of The Laws Of England, Volume Ii, Thomas J. Mcsweeney Feb 2016

Book Review Of The Oxford History Of The Laws Of England, Volume Ii, Thomas J. Mcsweeney

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Justice-As-Fairness As Judicial Guiding Principle: Remembering John Rawls And The Warren Court, Michael A. Lawrence Jan 2016

Justice-As-Fairness As Judicial Guiding Principle: Remembering John Rawls And The Warren Court, Michael A. Lawrence

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Lawyers' Empire And The Great Transformation, Douglas C. Harris Jan 2016

Lawyers' Empire And The Great Transformation, Douglas C. Harris

Faculty Publications

Writing through the years of World War II and attempting to understand its horrors, the carnage of World War I, the great depression, and the rise of communist and fascist regimes, Karl Polanyi posited that Western Europe had undergone The Great Transformation through the nineteenth century. Built around policies of economic liberalism and the gospel of the self-regulating market, this transformation had produced a century of unparalleled peace and material wealth in Europe, but the unmooring of the market from other social forces, and the remaking of land and labour as commodities, would unleash, when the buttressing pillars faltered, the ...


The Strangely Familiar History Of The Unitary Theory Of Perpetration, James G. Stewart Jan 2016

The Strangely Familiar History Of The Unitary Theory Of Perpetration, James G. Stewart

Faculty Publications

A unitary theory of perpetration is one that does not espouse different legal standards for different forms of participating in crime. In this Article, I pay homage to Professor Damaška’s influence on my work and career by reiterating my earlier arguments for a unitary theory of perpetration in international criminal law. Whereas my earlier work defended the unitary theory in abstract terms then for international criminal law in particular, this Article looks to the history of the unitary theory in five national systems that have abandoned differentiated systems like that currently in force internationally in favor of a unitary ...


The Significance Of The Corpus Juris Civilis: Matilda Of Canossa And The Revival Of Roman Law, Thomas J. Mcsweeney, Michéle K. Spike Feb 2015

The Significance Of The Corpus Juris Civilis: Matilda Of Canossa And The Revival Of Roman Law, Thomas J. Mcsweeney, Michéle K. Spike

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Law In East Florida 1783-1821, M C. Mirow Jan 2015

Law In East Florida 1783-1821, M C. Mirow

Faculty Publications

Using primary sources from the East Florida Papers, this article explores colonial legality in St. Augustine and the Province of East Florida during the second Spanish period from 1783 to 1821. In addition to discussing the promulgation of the Constitution of Cádiz and its effects, the article reaches into legal records dealing with civil and testamentary cases to explore and to describe aspects of private law in this North American Spanish colony. Economic and social relations are revealed in the sources that are rich in legal information concerning slavery, family, religion, trade, and landholding. The article concludes that the sources ...


The Historical Origins Of The Debt-Equity Distinction, Camden Hutchison Jan 2015

The Historical Origins Of The Debt-Equity Distinction, Camden Hutchison

Faculty Publications

The U.S. tax code favors corporate debt over corporate equity, a distinction long criticized by economists, legal scholars, and other tax commentators as both theoretically and practically unsound. For decades, academics and policymakers from a variety of disciplinary and political backgrounds have argued that this so-called “debt-equity distinction” distorts corporate financing decisions, encourages excess borrowing, and invites troublesome tax-avoidance behavior. Surprisingly, despite widespread critical attention, the origins of this policy remain a mystery. Primarily focused on its contemporary significance, scholars have disregarded the distinction’s past. This article uses historical evidence to trace the debt-equity distinction’s origins, development ...


Magna Carta And The Right To Trial By Jury, Thomas J. Mcsweeney Oct 2014

Magna Carta And The Right To Trial By Jury, Thomas J. Mcsweeney

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Reforming High School American History Curricula: What Publicized Student Intolerance Can Teach Policymakers, Douglas E. Abrams Oct 2014

Reforming High School American History Curricula: What Publicized Student Intolerance Can Teach Policymakers, Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

This article concerns the way public high schools teach American history under curricula and standards mandated by state law. “We’re raising young people who are, by and large, historically illiterate,” says David McCullough, the dean of American historians.

The article describes three recent nationally publicized incidents in which high school students belittled lynching and the Trail of Tears, evidently without appreciating the episodes’ legal and historical significance to African Americans and Native Americans respectively. Standards and textbooks typically recognize diversity and multiculturalism, but research and surveys indicate that classroom teachers frequently sanitize or avoid discomforting topics that might trigger ...


Magna Carta, Civil Law, And Canon Law, Thomas J. Mcsweeney Jan 2014

Magna Carta, Civil Law, And Canon Law, Thomas J. Mcsweeney

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


A Theory Of Civil Liability, Nathan B. Oman Jan 2014

A Theory Of Civil Liability, Nathan B. Oman

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Age Of Constitutions In The Americas, M C. Mirow Jan 2014

The Age Of Constitutions In The Americas, M C. Mirow

Faculty Publications

The late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries have been aptly called the “Age of Codifications.” The same period was also the Age of Constitutions. Although a great deal is known about the migration of prenational and transnational legal sources and ideas that led to national codes of civil and criminal law in Europe and the Americas, much less is known about similar processes on the constitutional level. Constitutional historians have been more parochial than their private law counterparts, most likely because of the relationship between constitutions and nations. In the light of independence, nations immediately needed constitutions to solidify gains and ...


The Surprising Role Of Racial Hierarchy In The Civil Rights Jurisprudence Of The First Justice John Marshall Harlan, Davison M. Douglas Apr 2013

The Surprising Role Of Racial Hierarchy In The Civil Rights Jurisprudence Of The First Justice John Marshall Harlan, Davison M. Douglas

Faculty Publications

The first Justice John Marshall Harlan’s status as one of the greatest Supreme Court Justices in American history rests largely upon his civil rights jurisprudence. The literature exploring the nuances of Harlan’s civil rights jurisprudence is vast. Far less attention has been paid to the reasons for Harlan’s strong civil rights views. Developing a rich sense of Harlan’s thinking has been difficult because Harlan did not leave behind a large trove of non-judicial writings. There is, however, a remarkable source of Harlan’s thought that has been largely overlooked by scholars: Harlan’s constitutional law lectures ...


Facts, Formalism, And The Brandeis Brief: The Origins Of A Myth, Noga Morag-Levine Jan 2013

Facts, Formalism, And The Brandeis Brief: The Origins Of A Myth, Noga Morag-Levine

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Between England And France: A Cross-Channel Legal Culture In The Late Thirteenth Century, Thomas J. Mcsweeney Jan 2013

Between England And France: A Cross-Channel Legal Culture In The Late Thirteenth Century, Thomas J. Mcsweeney

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Pre-Constitutional Law And Constitutions: Spanish Colonial Law And The Constitution Of Cádiz, M C. Mirow Jan 2013

Pre-Constitutional Law And Constitutions: Spanish Colonial Law And The Constitution Of Cádiz, M C. Mirow

Faculty Publications

This article contributes to the intellectual and legal history of this constitutional document. It also provides a close study of how pre-constitutional laws are employed in writing constitutions. It examines the way Spanish colonial law, known as "derecho indiano" in Spanish, was used in the process of drafting the Constitution and particularly the way these constitutional activities and provisions related to the Americas. The article asserts that this pre-constitutional law was used in three distinct ways: as general knowledge related to the Americas and their institutions; as a source for providing a particular answer to a specific legal question; and ...


Teaching Legal History In The Age Of Practical Legal Education, Douglas E. Abrams Jan 2013

Teaching Legal History In The Age Of Practical Legal Education, Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

Historian Henry Steele Commager said, “History is useful in the sense that art is useful--or music or poetry or flowers; perhaps even in the sense that religion and philosophy is useful .... For without these things life would be poorer and meaner.” For law students who anticipate a career representing private and public clients and participating in public discussion, however, study of legal history carries rewards beyond intellectual stimulation and personal satisfaction. Law students contemplating client representation should ponder Justice Holmes's advice that “[h]istory must be a part of the study [of law], because without it we cannot know ...


Lost Options For Mutual Gain? The Layperson, The Lawyer, And Dispute Resolution In Early America, Carli N. Conklin Jan 2013

Lost Options For Mutual Gain? The Layperson, The Lawyer, And Dispute Resolution In Early America, Carli N. Conklin

Faculty Publications

In 1786, legal reform activist Benjamin Austin undertook a campaign to promote the use of arbitration over litigation as the primary method of dispute resolution in Massachusetts. Although supported by a groundswell of anti-lawyer sentiment, Austin ultimately failed in securing the triumph of arbitration. Exploring Austin's pamphlet campaign in its historical context not only provides us with a snapshot of the arguments for and against dispute resolution in early America, but also serves as a corrective to the prevailing accounts of arbitration in American legal history. This article explores the context and content of Austin's pamphlet campaign and ...


The Supreme Court’S Regulation Of Civil Procedure: Lessons From Administrative Law, Lumen N. Mulligan, Glen Staszewski Jun 2012

The Supreme Court’S Regulation Of Civil Procedure: Lessons From Administrative Law, Lumen N. Mulligan, Glen Staszewski

Faculty Publications

In this Article, we argue that the U.S. Supreme Court should route most Federal Rules of Civil Procedure issues through the notice-and-comment rulemaking process of the Civil Rules Advisory Committee instead of issuing judgments in adjudications, unless the Court can resolve the case solely through the deployment of traditional tools of statutory interpretation. While we are not the first to express a preference for rulemaking on civil procedure issues, we advance the position in four significant ways. First, we argue that the Supreme Court in the civil procedure arena is vested with powers analogous to most administrative agencies. Second ...