Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Cattlemen's Day

2000

Articles 31 - 47 of 47

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Effects Of Late-Summer Protein Supplementation On Stocker Cattle Performance, Feedlot Gain, And Carcass Traits, T.T. Marston, D.O. Yauk, L.E. Wankel, J.F. Gleghorn Jan 2000

Effects Of Late-Summer Protein Supplementation On Stocker Cattle Performance, Feedlot Gain, And Carcass Traits, T.T. Marston, D.O. Yauk, L.E. Wankel, J.F. Gleghorn

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A 2-year trial was conducted to study the effects of feeding an Arsoy™-based, 32% crude protein supplement to stocker cattle grazing late-summer native pastures. During about 90 days of late-summer/fall grazing, the steers efficiently converted the Arsoy supplement (5.3:1, as fed basis) into significantly greater weight gains (55 lb) relative to nonsupplemented contemporaries. Both groups of steers then were finished and slaughtered in commercial facilities to determine if the supplementation program had any carryover effects. Late-summer supplementation did not influence steers' feedlot gain or carcass traits including ribeye area, fat thickness, and quality grade. However, average ...


Refractive Index: A Rapid Method For Determination Of Starch Availability In Grains, J.J. Sindt, Sean P. Montgomery, T.B. Farran, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Refractive Index: A Rapid Method For Determination Of Starch Availability In Grains, J.J. Sindt, Sean P. Montgomery, T.B. Farran, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Steam-flaked corn samples were used in a series of experiments to determine if refractive index could be used as a rapid, inexpensive method to predict starch availability. Results were best when samples were incubated for 15 min with 500 to 600 active units of enzyme/gm of grain prior to measuring on a hand-held refractometer. Correlations to starch availability determined from gas production by a commercial lab were R=.64 for whole flakes and R=.79 when samples were ground. Samples of corn flaked to different densities produced estimates of solubility similar to an in situ dry matter disappearance assay ...


Effects Of Florfenicol Metaphylaxis In Reducing Morbidity And Associated Performance Losses In Stressed Beef Calves, G.L. Huck, Gerald L. Stokka, T.T. Marston, Thomas R. Falkner Jan 2000

Effects Of Florfenicol Metaphylaxis In Reducing Morbidity And Associated Performance Losses In Stressed Beef Calves, G.L. Huck, Gerald L. Stokka, T.T. Marston, Thomas R. Falkner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In February, 1998, 191 crossbred steers (885 lb) were used in a 28-day feeding trial to evaluate the effects of florfenicol (Nuflor®) on morbidity of newly weaned, lightweight cattle. No clinical signs of illness were observed in either the medicated or control group. No statistically significant differences in daily gain, feed intake, or feed efficiency were observed between treated and nontreated cattle.


Effects Of Sickness On Weight Gain And Radiant Energy Loss In Recently Received Feeder Cattle, M.F. Spire, J.M. Sargeant, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Effects Of Sickness On Weight Gain And Radiant Energy Loss In Recently Received Feeder Cattle, M.F. Spire, J.M. Sargeant, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sickness from undifferentiated respiratory disease in recently received feeder cattle reduced weight gain and altered radiant energy loss. Over a 35-day receiving period, weight gains were reduced 26.3% if an animal was diagnosed as sick once and 48.1% if diagnosed sick more than once. Thermal profiles obtained 10 or more days following clinical illness were cooler than profiles of animals never diagnosed as being sick. Our data suggest that respiratory disease alters metabolic activity as evidenced by reduced weight gain and a detectable decrease in radiant energy loss from the body surface.


Differences In Serum Immunoglobulin G1 And Total Protein Concentrations In Neonatal Calves On Days 1, 5, And 10, L.E. Wankel, T.T. Marston, Gerald L. Stokka, Timothy G. Rozell Jan 2000

Differences In Serum Immunoglobulin G1 And Total Protein Concentrations In Neonatal Calves On Days 1, 5, And 10, L.E. Wankel, T.T. Marston, Gerald L. Stokka, Timothy G. Rozell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) serum concentrations are used to evaluate passive transfer of immunity in neonatal calves. Total serum proteins also can be measured to evaluate calf health. If IgG1 and total serum protein concentrations change with age, it becomes imperative to compare samples only from a narrow time period. Otherwise, differences might be due to age and not immune status. To help define this time period, blood was drawn from 10 beef calves when they were 1, 5, and 10 days of age. Serum samples were analyzed for IgG1 and total protein concentrations. Total protein concentrations decreased from days 1 ...


Effects Of Dystocia And Confined Calving On Calf-Morbidity Rate From Birth To Weaning, M.W. Sanderson, D.A. Dargatz Jan 2000

Effects Of Dystocia And Confined Calving On Calf-Morbidity Rate From Birth To Weaning, M.W. Sanderson, D.A. Dargatz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

An analysis was performed on data from a national survey of US beef cow-calf producers to quantify the effects of management factors on calf-morbidity risk from birth to weaning. The analysis included 2,490 herds from 23 states. A high calf-morbidity herd was defined as one with greater than 10% morbidity. The rate of dystocia in the herd was categorized into five levels. All dystocia levels were associated significantly with increased risk of being a high calf-morbidity herd. Having greater than 70% of cows and heifers calve in confinement also was associated with increased risk of being a high calf-morbidity ...


Measuring The Finishing Performance Of Steers And Heifers, Michael R. Langemeier, R. Jones, Gerry L. Kuhl Jan 2000

Measuring The Finishing Performance Of Steers And Heifers, Michael R. Langemeier, R. Jones, Gerry L. Kuhl

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This study examined improvements in the finishing performance of steers and heifers from 1990 to 1998 by measuring the rate of technological change. The rates of technological change were 0.58% per year for finishing steers and 1.01% per year for finishing heifers. The relatively higher rate for heifers indicates that technological change over the study period favored the performance of heifers.


Factors Influencing The Initiation Of Estrous Cycles And Expression Of Estrus In Beef Cows, Jeffrey S. Stevenson Jan 2000

Factors Influencing The Initiation Of Estrous Cycles And Expression Of Estrus In Beef Cows, Jeffrey S. Stevenson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Body condition, parity, and days postpartum at the onset of the breeding season determine the proportion of cows that initiated first postpartum ovarian activity and ovulated before the start of the breeding season. Hormonal treatments that included both GnRH and a source of progestin enhanced expression of estrus and led to greater pregnancy rates of suckled beef cows.


Impacts Of Corn And Fed-Cattle Prices On Price Slides For Feeder Cattle, Kevin C. Dhuyvetter, Ted C. Schroeder Jan 2000

Impacts Of Corn And Fed-Cattle Prices On Price Slides For Feeder Cattle, Kevin C. Dhuyvetter, Ted C. Schroeder

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Several important determinants need to be considered when analyzing price slides (priceweight relationships) for feeder cattle. The two most economically important determinants of price-weight slides are expected fed-cattle price and corn price. Price-weight slides increase notably when corn prices decline (i.e., the premium for light-weight calves increases as feed prices decrease). Likewise, when expected fed-cattle prices increase, price-weight slides increase. Knowing this information can help producers who forward contract feeder cattle, backgrounders making decisions regarding feeding calves to various weights, and producers making feeder cattle purchase decisions.


Thiamin And Riboflavin Retention In Ground Beef Patties Pasteurized By Electron Beam, K.A. Hachmeister, Donald H. Kropf, V.S. Gill, Melvin C. Hunt, R.J. Kaye, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2000

Thiamin And Riboflavin Retention In Ground Beef Patties Pasteurized By Electron Beam, K.A. Hachmeister, Donald H. Kropf, V.S. Gill, Melvin C. Hunt, R.J. Kaye, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This research focused on the effects of an electron beam irradiation treatment with the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (PHEPP) accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Test variables included irradiation/storage temperatures (30 or 0°F), packaging environments (aerobic or nitrogen-flushed), and irradiation dose (0, 1.5, or 3.0 kGy). Ground beef patties formulated to a target fat level of 20% were packaged in barrier film under nitrogen (ca = 400 ppm residual oxygen) or sealed in aerobic packages (no vacuum), stored, and irradiated chilled or frozen. Thiamin and riboflavin levels were not affected (P>.05) by irradiation dose. Thiamin content ...


Effects Of Ph, Myoglobin Form, And Endpoint Temperature On Cooked Ground Beef Color, M.K. Schoenbeck, Donald H. Kropf, Melvin C. Hunt, S. Hawthorne, Sally L. Stroda Jan 2000

Effects Of Ph, Myoglobin Form, And Endpoint Temperature On Cooked Ground Beef Color, M.K. Schoenbeck, Donald H. Kropf, Melvin C. Hunt, S. Hawthorne, Sally L. Stroda

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Beef quadriceps muscles from nine pH groups (5.5 - 6.4 in .1 increments) were ground; mixed with fat (20%); formed into patties whose myoglobin was in either the oxy or deoxy state; and cooked to four endpoint temperatures (150, 160, 170, or 180°F). Internal cooked patty color was evaluated visually and instrumentally. Patties containing deoxymyoglobin with pH 6.2 or higher and cooked to 150 and 160°F were redder visually and instrumentally than those with a lower pH. Similar trends, but not as pronounced, were observed with patties containing oxymyoglobin. Deoxymyoglobin was more resistant to denaturation and ...


Quality And Display Life Of Chilled Or Frozen All-Natural Beef And Beef-Buffalo Frankfurters, R. Limsupavanich, Donald H. Kropf, K.A. Hachmeister, T.M. Loughin, Elizabeth A.E. Boyle, Michael A. Boland Jan 2000

Quality And Display Life Of Chilled Or Frozen All-Natural Beef And Beef-Buffalo Frankfurters, R. Limsupavanich, Donald H. Kropf, K.A. Hachmeister, T.M. Loughin, Elizabeth A.E. Boyle, Michael A. Boland

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Chilled (35±3°F) or frozen (0±3°F) all-natural beef and beef-buffalo frankfurters made with or without sodium nitrite (NaNO2) were evaluated. Treatments included frankfurters made with: all-natural beef without NaNO2 and displayed frozen (B0F); all-natural beef and buffalo without NaNO2 and displayed frozen (BU0F); all-natural beef with NaNO2 and displayed frozen (BNF) or chilled (BNC). Batter pH, smokehouse yield, and proximate analysis were determined. No differences (P>.05) were noted in batter pH, smokehouse yield, proximate analysis, or cooking yield. Day of display had no influence (P>.05) on oxidation. However, BU0F had the highest (P<.05) oxidation value, a measure of potential rancidity. For all treatments, instrumentally measured lightness increased during display, while redness decreased. Both B0F and BU0F had lower (P<.05) redness and nitrosoheme pigments than BNC. Purge loss increased (P<.05) with longer display. Microbial counts and pH of frozen products were not different (P>.05) during ...


Escherichia Coli O157:H7 Risk Assessment For Blade-Tenderized Beef Steaks, H. Thippareddi, S. Sporing, Randall K. Phebus, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2000

Escherichia Coli O157:H7 Risk Assessment For Blade-Tenderized Beef Steaks, H. Thippareddi, S. Sporing, Randall K. Phebus, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The potential translocation of E. coli O157:H7 from the surface to the interior of whole muscle by blade tenderization was evaluated. Beef top sirloin subprimals were inoculated with 106 or 103 cfu/cm2 and passed once through a Ross blade tenderization unit. Core samples showed a translocation of 3 to 4% of surface inoculum to the geometric center of the subprimal. A second study evaluated thermal destruction of E. coli O157:H7 in blade tenderized (BT) steaks compared to nontenderized (NT) steaks of three thicknesses when ovenbroiled. Subprimal surfaces were inoculated to a level of 107 cfu/cm2 and ...


Effects Of Postmortem Aging Period And Blade Tenderization On Sensory Traits Of Beef Steaks, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2000

Effects Of Postmortem Aging Period And Blade Tenderization On Sensory Traits Of Beef Steaks, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used 54 strip loins, 54 top sirloin butts, and 54 inside rounds, all USDA Choice grade, to determine the influence of different postmortem aging periods and blade tenderization passes on sensory panel traits. Cuts were aged for 7, 14, or 21 days and not tenderized (0X) or blade tenderized one (1X) or two (2X) times. All steaks were cooked to 160°F internally, and samples were evaluated by a trained sensory panel for flavor intensity, juiciness, myofibrillar tenderness, connective tissue amount, and overall tenderness. Both longer aging periods and blade tenderization passes improved tenderness of strip loin and top ...


Effects Of Quality Grade, Aging Period, Blade Tenderization, And Degree Of Doneness On Tenderness Of Strip Loin, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2000

Effects Of Quality Grade, Aging Period, Blade Tenderization, And Degree Of Doneness On Tenderness Of Strip Loin, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used 162 strip loins to determine the influence of different quality grades, aging periods, blade tenderization passes, and degree of doneness on thawing and cooking loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS, tenderness). Select (SEL), Choice (CHO), and Certified Angus Beef™ (CAB) strip loins were aged for 7, 14, or 21 days and not tenderized (0X) or blade tenderized one (1X) or two (2X) times. Steaks from each strip loin were assigned randomly to final endpoint cooking temperatures of 150, 160, and 170°F. For steaks aged 7 days, all quality grade and blade tenderization treatments had similar (P>.05 ...


Effects Of Quality Grade, Aging Period, Blade Tenderization, And Degree Of Doneness On Tenderness Of Inside Round Steaks, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2000

Effects Of Quality Grade, Aging Period, Blade Tenderization, And Degree Of Doneness On Tenderness Of Inside Round Steaks, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used 162 inside rounds to determine the influence of different quality grades, postmortem aging periods, blade tenderization passes, and degree of doneness on thawing and cooking losses and Warner-Bratzler Shear force (WBS, tenderness). Select (SEL), Choice (CHO), and Certified Angus Beef™ (CAB) inside rounds were aged for 7, 14, or 21 days and not tenderized (0X) or blade tenderized one (1X) or two (2X) times. Steaks from each inside round were assigned randomly to final endpoint cooking temperatures of 150, 160, and 170°F. Percentage of thawing loss was higher (P<.05) for steaks aged 7 days than steaks aged 14 and 21 days. For CHO steaks only, cooking loss was higher (P<.05) for the 2X group compared to the 0X and 1X groups. Steaks aged 14 and 21 days had lower (P<.05) WBS than steaks aged 7 days. Cooking loss and WBS were higher (P<.05) with each increase in endpoint cooking temperature. Postmortem aging (14 or 21 days) and lower endpoint cooking temperatures were the most effective methods to improve WBS of inside round steaks.


Effects Of Quality Grade, Aging Period, Blade Tenderization, And Degree Of Doneness On Tenderness Of Top Sirloin Butt Steaks, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2000

Effects Of Quality Grade, Aging Period, Blade Tenderization, And Degree Of Doneness On Tenderness Of Top Sirloin Butt Steaks, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used 162 top sirloin butts to determine the influence of different quality grades, postmortem aging periods, blade tenderization passes, and degree of doneness on thawing and cooking losses and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS, tenderness). Select (SEL), Choice (CHO), and Certified Angus Beef™ (CAB) top sirloin butts (n=54 for each) were aged for 7, 14, or 21 days and not tenderized (OX) or blade tenderized one (1X) or two (2X) times. Steaks from each top sirloin butt were assigned randomly to final endpoint cooking temperatures of 150, 160, and 170°F. Each longer aging period resulted in lower (P<.05, more tender) WBS. In addition, steaks blade tenderized 2X had lower (P<.05) WBS than steaks not tenderized or blade tenderized 1X. Within each quality grade, WBS increased (P<.05) as endpoint cooking temperature increased. When cooked to 160 or 170°F, CHO and CAB steaks had lower (P<.05) WBS than SEL steaks. Increased aging periods and blade tenderization passes of top sirloin butt steaks improved tenderness. When cooking to higher endpoint temperatures, using higher quality grades will minimize toughness caused by cooking.