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Cattlemen's Day

2000

Articles 1 - 30 of 47

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Effects Of Nonprotein Nitrogen Source In Blocks On Rumen Parameters Of Steers Fed Prairie Hay, C.A. Löest, B.D. Lambert, A.M. Trater, Evan C. Titgemeyer, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Effects Of Nonprotein Nitrogen Source In Blocks On Rumen Parameters Of Steers Fed Prairie Hay, C.A. Löest, B.D. Lambert, A.M. Trater, Evan C. Titgemeyer, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Six ruminally cannulated steers (1012 lb) were fed prairie hay ad libitum supplemented with cooked molasses blocks that contained either 60% crude protein 83% of which came from urea (UREA block) or 60% crude protein with 42% from urea and 42% from biuret (UREA/BIURET block). Blocks were broken into small pieces to facilitate consumption and were fed once daily at .125% of body weight. Rumen samples were collected on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 16 hours after feeding blocks. Averaged over time, ruminal ammonia and total volatile fatty acid ...


Quality And Display Life Of Chilled Or Frozen All-Natural Beef And Beef-Buffalo Frankfurters, R. Limsupavanich, Donald H. Kropf, K.A. Hachmeister, T.M. Loughin, Elizabeth A.E. Boyle, Michael A. Boland Jan 2000

Quality And Display Life Of Chilled Or Frozen All-Natural Beef And Beef-Buffalo Frankfurters, R. Limsupavanich, Donald H. Kropf, K.A. Hachmeister, T.M. Loughin, Elizabeth A.E. Boyle, Michael A. Boland

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Chilled (35±3°F) or frozen (0±3°F) all-natural beef and beef-buffalo frankfurters made with or without sodium nitrite (NaNO2) were evaluated. Treatments included frankfurters made with: all-natural beef without NaNO2 and displayed frozen (B0F); all-natural beef and buffalo without NaNO2 and displayed frozen (BU0F); all-natural beef with NaNO2 and displayed frozen (BNF) or chilled (BNC). Batter pH, smokehouse yield, and proximate analysis were determined. No differences (P>.05) were noted in batter pH, smokehouse yield, proximate analysis, or cooking yield. Day of display had no influence (P>.05) on oxidation. However, BU0F had the highest (P<.05) oxidation value, a measure of potential rancidity. For all treatments, instrumentally measured lightness increased during display, while redness decreased. Both B0F and BU0F had lower (P<.05) redness and nitrosoheme pigments than BNC. Purge loss increased (P<.05) with longer display. Microbial counts and pH of frozen products were not different (P>.05) during ...


Translocation Of Natural Microflora From Muscle Surface To Interior By Blade Tenderization, M.N. Hajmeer, E. Ceylan, James L. Marsden, Randall K. Phebus Jan 2000

Translocation Of Natural Microflora From Muscle Surface To Interior By Blade Tenderization, M.N. Hajmeer, E. Ceylan, James L. Marsden, Randall K. Phebus

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The effect of blade tenderization on translocation of natural microflora from the surface to the interior of longissimus dorsi steaks aged for 7, 14, and 21 days was evaluated. Samples from the exterior and interior of steaks from blade-tenderized (BT) and non-blade-tenderized (N-BT) strip loins were analyzed for aerobic plate, coliform, and Escherichia coli counts. Results showed that BT translocated microorganisms (aerobic plate counts) from the exterior to the interior of muscle. Microorganism numbers increased with extended storage (P<.05). Counts of coliforms and Escherichia coli recovered from BT steaks were comparable to those from N-BT steaks because of very low exterior counts, showing the importance of good hygiene.


Factors Influencing The Initiation Of Estrous Cycles And Expression Of Estrus In Beef Cows, Jeffrey S. Stevenson Jan 2000

Factors Influencing The Initiation Of Estrous Cycles And Expression Of Estrus In Beef Cows, Jeffrey S. Stevenson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Body condition, parity, and days postpartum at the onset of the breeding season determine the proportion of cows that initiated first postpartum ovarian activity and ovulated before the start of the breeding season. Hormonal treatments that included both GnRH and a source of progestin enhanced expression of estrus and led to greater pregnancy rates of suckled beef cows.


A Survey On The Use Of Blade Tenderizers By Beef Fabrication Plants, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2000

A Survey On The Use Of Blade Tenderizers By Beef Fabrication Plants, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A questionnaire to determine the use of blade tenderizers in beef fabrication facilities was sent to 241 members of the North American Meat Processors Association (NAMP). Eighty-four percent of the 90 respondents used blade tenderizers. These subprimals were at least sometimes tenderized by the following percentages of respondents: tenderloins, 7.9; chuck cuts, 18; round cuts, 36; ribeyes, 38; strip loins, 56; and top sirloin butts, 62. If a processor blade-tenderized a particular cut, they tenderized a majority of their production for that cut, generally with multiple passes through the tenderizer. For example, the 62% of respondents who tenderized top ...


Effects Of Frequency Of Supplementation On Performance Of Beef Cows Grazing Winter Pasture, C.G. Farmer, R.C. Cochran, D.D. Simms, E.A. Klevesahl, T.A. Wickersham Jan 2000

Effects Of Frequency Of Supplementation On Performance Of Beef Cows Grazing Winter Pasture, C.G. Farmer, R.C. Cochran, D.D. Simms, E.A. Klevesahl, T.A. Wickersham

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred twenty spring-calving Hereford x Angus cows grazing low-quality tallgrass-prairie forage during the winter of 1998 were fed a 43% crude protein supplement 2, 3, 5, or 7 days a week. Supplement was fed at 4 lb/head daily to cows supplemented daily. The other cows still received 28 lb per week but divided equally among feedings. Cumulative performance (measured by changes in body condition score and body weight) was slightly better with increased supplementation frequency. However, the magnitude of differences in body condition and body weight changes, even for the most extreme treatment comparisons, were relatively small.


The Effect Of Long-Term Management Of Native Grass Pastures On Steer Gains, F.K. Brazle, Dale L. Lanham, Jeffrey L. Davidson Jan 2000

The Effect Of Long-Term Management Of Native Grass Pastures On Steer Gains, F.K. Brazle, Dale L. Lanham, Jeffrey L. Davidson

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three hundred thirteen mixed breed steers (558 lb) were used to determine the effect of long-term management of native grass pastures on gain. Steers were allotted randomly to eight pastures previously grazed for 1/2 season (1 steer/2 acres from April to July 15, 81 days) or 3/4 season (1 steer/3 acres from April to August 15, 112 days) from 1990 to 1998. In 1999, all pastures were stocked at 1 steer/2 acres and grazed 83 days until July 15 or 16. The steers received free-choice mineral and were supplemented six times with 2 lb of ...


Effects Of Nonprotein Nitrogen Source In Blocks On Intake And Digestion Of Prairie Hay By Steers, C.A. Löest, James S. Drouillard, B.D. Lambert, A.M. Trater, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2000

Effects Of Nonprotein Nitrogen Source In Blocks On Intake And Digestion Of Prairie Hay By Steers, C.A. Löest, James S. Drouillard, B.D. Lambert, A.M. Trater, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This intake and digestion study evaluated source of nonprotein nitrogen in cooked molasses blocks supplemented to 18 steers (590 lb) with ad libitum access to prairie hay, Treatments were 1) control (no block), 2) a block containing 60% crude protein with 83% from urea (UREA block), and 3) a block containing 60% crude protein with 42% from urea and 42% from biuret (UREA/BIURET block). Blocks were broken into small pieces to facilitate rapid consumption and fed once daily at .125% of body weight. Forage intake increased by 22%, total intakes (forage plus block) increased by 28%, and digestible organic ...


Integrated Control Of Sericea Lespedeza In Kansas, Walter H. Fick Jan 2000

Integrated Control Of Sericea Lespedeza In Kansas, Walter H. Fick

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two experiments were conducted near Maple Hill, KS in 1998 to compare the effectiveness of herbicides and mowing used alone and in combination for control of sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata). Remedy® at 0.5 lb/acre was more effective when applied during the vegetative growth stage (>87%) than during flowering or seed production. Ally® at 0.4 oz/acre provided control equivalent to Remedy and was equally effective at both the vegetative and bloom stages. Both herbicides provided less than 60% control when applied during seed production. A single mowing on July 8 was not effective. Mowing followed in 6 ...


Supplementation Strategies For Forage-Fed Beef Steers, R.D. Hunter, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard, Dale A. Blasi Jan 2000

Supplementation Strategies For Forage-Fed Beef Steers, R.D. Hunter, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard, Dale A. Blasi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A comparison was made of different supplementation strategies for steer calves wintered on brome hay for 109 days. Treatments consisted of no supplement, 1.33 lb/head daily of a 30% protein range cube, a commercially available free-choice block supplement containing 40% crude protein (19% as non-protein nitrogen), and a soy-based block supplement containing soy solubles and full-fat soybeans with 40% crude protein (25% as nonprotein nitrogen). Following the backgrounding phase, steers were placed onto finishing rations and fed for an additional 152 days before being slaughtered. Gain during the growing phase was greater for all supplemented cattle than for ...


Alfalfa Hay Levels In Limit-Fed, High-Energy, Growing Diets For Beef Steers, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, R.A. Stock, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Alfalfa Hay Levels In Limit-Fed, High-Energy, Growing Diets For Beef Steers, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, R.A. Stock, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred sixty-four crossbred beef steers were used in a 102-day growing study to determine optimum levels of alfalfa hay in limit-fed, high-energy, growing diets. Diets contained steam-flaked corn and 40% Sweet Bran® brand wet corn gluten feed (dry matter basis) with 0, 10, or 20% ground alfalfa hay. A fourth diet containing steam-flaked corn (no Sweet Bran) and 20% ground alfalfa hay was used as a control. Average daily gains and feed efficiencies in the growing phase were greater (P<.05) for cattle fed no alfalfa than for cattle fed the control, 10% alfalfa, or 20% alfalfa diets. Steers fed the control and 20% alfalfa diets had increased rates of dry matter intake (P<.05) compared to those fed no alfalfa. At the end of the growing phase, all cattle were placed on a common finishing diet and fed for 101 days. Dry matter intakes during the finishing phase for cattle previously fed no alfalfa were numerically less than intakes for cattle fed other diets and significantly less than intakes for cattle previously fed the control diet. Feed efficiencies were greater for cattle previously fed 20% alfalfa diets than those fed the control diet (P<.05). Average daily gains did not differ (P>.40) among diets during the finishing phase.


Effects Of Carnitine On Performance Of Finishing Steers, R.H. Greenwood, C.A. Löest, Evan C. Titgemeyer, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Effects Of Carnitine On Performance Of Finishing Steers, R.H. Greenwood, C.A. Löest, Evan C. Titgemeyer, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Ninety-five crossbred steers (787 lb initial body weight) were fed finishing diets (14.5% crude protein) for 129 days. Diets were based on steam-flaked corn and contained 6% alfalfa and 4% tallow. Steers were supplemented with 2 g per day of L-carnitine, or not supplemented (control). Feed intakes, gains, and feed efficiencies were not impacted by carnitine supplementation. However, steers receiving L-carnitine had fatter carcasses as indicated by tendencies (P<.2) for more subcutaneous fat, higher marbling scores, and higher yield grades. Carnitine supplementation may increase fat deposition and alter carcass quality of finishing cattle.


Betaine Supplementation For Finishing Cattle, C.A. Löest, C.M. Coetzer, R.D. Hunter, B.D. Lambert, Evan C. Titgemeyer, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Betaine Supplementation For Finishing Cattle, C.A. Löest, C.M. Coetzer, R.D. Hunter, B.D. Lambert, Evan C. Titgemeyer, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Crossbred heifers (756 lb) were used to evaluate the effects of feed-grade betaine on animal performance and carcass characteristics. Heifers had ad libitum access to a finishing diet without betaine or with 4, 8, or 12 g/day of feed-grade betaine top-dressed at feeding. Feed intakes, gains, and feed efficiencies were not significantly altered by feed-grade betaine. Hot carcass weights tended to increase with the betaine supplementation, but dressing percent; percentage of kidney, pelvic and heart fat; fat thickness; or ribeye area were not altered. Yield grades were numerically greater, and marbling scores significantly greater for heifers supplemented with 4 ...


Combinations Of Wet Corn Gluten Feed And Steam Flaked Corn In Finishing Cattle Diets, J.J. Sindt, Sean P. Montgomery, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, R.T. Ethington, R.U. Lindquist, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Combinations Of Wet Corn Gluten Feed And Steam Flaked Corn In Finishing Cattle Diets, J.J. Sindt, Sean P. Montgomery, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, R.T. Ethington, R.U. Lindquist, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A 152-day experiment was conducted using 615 crossbred steers to evaluate cattle performance when steam-flaked corn in finishing diets was replaced partially with wet corn gluten feed (CGF). Finishing diets contained no wet CGF (0CGF) or 30 and 60% CGF on a dry matter basis (30CGF and 60CGF). Ruminal and fecal pH increased linearly (P<.01) as the proportion of wet corn gluten feed increased. Cattle fed 60CGF gained less than those fed 30CGF (P<.01) and were less efficient than cattle fed 0CGF or 30CGF (P<.05). Dressing percentage was lower (P<.03) for cattle fed 60CGF compared to cattle fed 30CGF. Incidence of liver abscesses increased linearly (P<.01) as the level of CGF increased. Replacing steamflaked corn with wet CGF at 30% of the diet did not alter performance.


Increasing Levels Of Rumensin® In Limit-Fed, High Energy, Growing Diets For Beef Steers And Effects On Subsequent Finishing Performance, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Increasing Levels Of Rumensin® In Limit-Fed, High Energy, Growing Diets For Beef Steers And Effects On Subsequent Finishing Performance, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred sixty-four crossbred beef steers were used to determine optimal Rumensin ® concentrations in limit-fed, high-energy, growing diets. Diets contained 30, 40, or 50 grams of Rumensin per ton of dry matter (R30, R40, and R50). Average daily gain and feed efficiency during the growing phase were not different (P>.80) among treatments. Steers that received R50 in the growing phase had the highest average daily gains during the finishing phase (P<.05). This resulted in heavier carcass weights for R50 than R30 (P<.05) and R40 (P<.12). Feed efficiencies during the finishing phase were not different among treatments (P>.40).


Effects Of High-Grain Or High-Roughage Transition Diets On Finishing Performance Of Cattle Previously Fed High-Concentrate Growing Diets, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Effects Of High-Grain Or High-Roughage Transition Diets On Finishing Performance Of Cattle Previously Fed High-Concentrate Growing Diets, Sean P. Montgomery, J.J. Sindt, T.B. Farran, H.J. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, T.A. Nutsch, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Three hundred twenty-eight crossbred beef steers previously fed high-concentrate growing diets had ad libitum access to one of two transition diets prior to initiation of the finishing phase. Transition diets consisted of 58% steam-flaked corn and 30% alfalfa hay or of 23% steamflaked corn and 65% alfalfa hay (DM basis). Average daily gains, dry matter intakes, and feed efficiencies during the transition phase were greater for steers fed the high-grain diet than for steers fed the high-roughage diet (P<.01). This resulted in heavier carcass weights at the end of the subsequent finishing phase for steers fed the high-grain transition diet (P<.05). Average daily gains and feed efficiencies in the finishing phase were not affected by the type of diet fed during the transition phase (P>.20).


Relationship Of Plasma Glucose To Performance And Carcass Traits In Finishing Cattle, H.J. Labrune, D.J. Bindel, C.C. Coetzer, C.A. Löest, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Relationship Of Plasma Glucose To Performance And Carcass Traits In Finishing Cattle, H.J. Labrune, D.J. Bindel, C.C. Coetzer, C.A. Löest, R.D. Hunter, James J. Higgins, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Blood glucose levels of finishing cattle were measured between 3 and 30 days prior to slaughter and compared to performance and carcass traits. In trial 1, blood samples were obtained from 318 heifers at 2 hours postfeeding at 30 days before slaughter. Plasma glucose levels were correlated positively with fat thickness (P<.01) and kidney, pelvic, and heart fat (P<.02). Trial 2 utilized 72 steers from which blood was collected at 15 hours postfeeding at 3 days before slaughter. Blood glucose was correlated positively with average daily gain (P<.01); dry matter intake (P<.01); hot carcass weight (P<.01); ribeye area (P<.01); fat thickness (P<.06); and kidney, pelvic, and heart fat (P<.01). A third trial was conducted with 77 individually fed steers to determine if blood glucose levels could be used to predict finishing performance and carcass traits. Contrary to trials 1 and 2, plasma glucose did not reflect performance or carcass traits except marbling score (P<.03).


Differences In Serum Immunoglobulin G1 And Total Protein Concentrations In Neonatal Calves On Days 1, 5, And 10, L.E. Wankel, T.T. Marston, Gerald L. Stokka, Timothy G. Rozell Jan 2000

Differences In Serum Immunoglobulin G1 And Total Protein Concentrations In Neonatal Calves On Days 1, 5, And 10, L.E. Wankel, T.T. Marston, Gerald L. Stokka, Timothy G. Rozell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) serum concentrations are used to evaluate passive transfer of immunity in neonatal calves. Total serum proteins also can be measured to evaluate calf health. If IgG1 and total serum protein concentrations change with age, it becomes imperative to compare samples only from a narrow time period. Otherwise, differences might be due to age and not immune status. To help define this time period, blood was drawn from 10 beef calves when they were 1, 5, and 10 days of age. Serum samples were analyzed for IgG1 and total protein concentrations. Total protein concentrations decreased from days 1 ...


Alternatives To Cash Prices In Fed-Cattle Price Discovery, J. Mintert, Ted C. Schroeder Jan 2000

Alternatives To Cash Prices In Fed-Cattle Price Discovery, J. Mintert, Ted C. Schroeder

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Price discovery in fed cattle markets is a significant concern as cash market volume declines and trade becomes more sporadic. Producers need to consider other sources of pricing information when negotiating cash trade and long-term marketing agreements. This study evaluated several alternative price sources for producers to consider. Live cattle futures and wholesale boxed-beef prices offer the most promise; however, both also have limitations associated with their use.


Supplemental Progestin Increases Pregnancy Rates In Suckled Beef Cows, G.C. Lamb, J.A. Cartmill, B.A. Hensley, S.E. El-Zarkouny, T.J. Marple, Jeffrey S. Stevenson, David M. Grieger Jan 2000

Supplemental Progestin Increases Pregnancy Rates In Suckled Beef Cows, G.C. Lamb, J.A. Cartmill, B.A. Hensley, S.E. El-Zarkouny, T.J. Marple, Jeffrey S. Stevenson, David M. Grieger

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In two experiments, combining a source of progestin with the ovulation synchronization protocol using gonadotropin-releasing hormone plus prostaglandin F2α (GnRH + PGF2α) tended to increase or statistically increase pregnancy rates in suckled cows compared to GnRH + PGF2α alone. These improvements were accomplished without any detected estrus when cows were inseminated and received a second injection of GnRH at 48 hr after PGF2α.


Effects Of Ph, Myoglobin Form, And Endpoint Temperature On Cooked Ground Beef Color, M.K. Schoenbeck, Donald H. Kropf, Melvin C. Hunt, S. Hawthorne, Sally L. Stroda Jan 2000

Effects Of Ph, Myoglobin Form, And Endpoint Temperature On Cooked Ground Beef Color, M.K. Schoenbeck, Donald H. Kropf, Melvin C. Hunt, S. Hawthorne, Sally L. Stroda

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Beef quadriceps muscles from nine pH groups (5.5 - 6.4 in .1 increments) were ground; mixed with fat (20%); formed into patties whose myoglobin was in either the oxy or deoxy state; and cooked to four endpoint temperatures (150, 160, 170, or 180°F). Internal cooked patty color was evaluated visually and instrumentally. Patties containing deoxymyoglobin with pH 6.2 or higher and cooked to 150 and 160°F were redder visually and instrumentally than those with a lower pH. Similar trends, but not as pronounced, were observed with patties containing oxymyoglobin. Deoxymyoglobin was more resistant to denaturation and ...


Effects Of Postmortem Aging Period And Blade Tenderization On Sensory Traits Of Beef Steaks, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2000

Effects Of Postmortem Aging Period And Blade Tenderization On Sensory Traits Of Beef Steaks, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used 54 strip loins, 54 top sirloin butts, and 54 inside rounds, all USDA Choice grade, to determine the influence of different postmortem aging periods and blade tenderization passes on sensory panel traits. Cuts were aged for 7, 14, or 21 days and not tenderized (0X) or blade tenderized one (1X) or two (2X) times. All steaks were cooked to 160°F internally, and samples were evaluated by a trained sensory panel for flavor intensity, juiciness, myofibrillar tenderness, connective tissue amount, and overall tenderness. Both longer aging periods and blade tenderization passes improved tenderness of strip loin and top ...


Effects Of Quality Grade, Aging Period, Blade Tenderization, And Degree Of Doneness On Tenderness Of Strip Loin, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner Jan 2000

Effects Of Quality Grade, Aging Period, Blade Tenderization, And Degree Of Doneness On Tenderness Of Strip Loin, C.D. George-Evins, John A. Unruh, James L. Marsden, Curtis L. Kastner

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

We used 162 strip loins to determine the influence of different quality grades, aging periods, blade tenderization passes, and degree of doneness on thawing and cooking loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS, tenderness). Select (SEL), Choice (CHO), and Certified Angus Beef™ (CAB) strip loins were aged for 7, 14, or 21 days and not tenderized (0X) or blade tenderized one (1X) or two (2X) times. Steaks from each strip loin were assigned randomly to final endpoint cooking temperatures of 150, 160, and 170°F. For steaks aged 7 days, all quality grade and blade tenderization treatments had similar (P>.05 ...


Effects Of Cattle Grazing Crop Residues On Soil Bulk Density, R.K. Taylor, John W. Slocombe Jan 2000

Effects Of Cattle Grazing Crop Residues On Soil Bulk Density, R.K. Taylor, John W. Slocombe

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Effects of cattle grazing on soil bulk density were measured at two sites in central Kansas. Samples were taken at depths of 0 to 3 in. and 3 to 6 in. from grazed and ungrazed areas at five locations in each field. No statistical difference (P>0.01) between bulk densities of the two areas occurred at the 3 to 6 in. depth for either site. However, soil in the grazed areas had significantly higher (P<0.01) bulk density than that in the ungrazed areas at the 0 to 3 in. depth at both sites.


Effects Of Stage Of Maturity At Harvest And Kernel Processing On The Nutrient Digestibility Of Corn Silage, T.J. Wistuba, L.A. Whitlock, M.K. Siefers, K.K. Bolsen, Ronald V. Pope Jan 2000

Effects Of Stage Of Maturity At Harvest And Kernel Processing On The Nutrient Digestibility Of Corn Silage, T.J. Wistuba, L.A. Whitlock, M.K. Siefers, K.K. Bolsen, Ronald V. Pope

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Twelve ruminally cannulated crossbred steers were used to evaluate the effects of stage of maturity and kernel processing (rolling) of whole-plant corn silage on nutrient digestibilities. The six silage rations were: 50% milkline, 80% milkline, and 7 days after-black layer (7BL) each ensiled processed (rolled) or unprocessed. Steers consuming the 80% milkline and 7BL processed rations had numerically higher DM and OM digestibilities, and all processed rations had numerically higher starch digestibilities. However, the three processed rations had numerically lower fiber digestibilities (NDF and/or ADF). Steers consuming the 80% milkline rations had numerically higher nutrient digestibilities than those fed ...


Effect Of Level Of Surface-Spoiled Silage On The Nutritive Value Of Corn Silage-Based Rations, L.A. Whitlock, T. Wistuba, M.K. Siefers, B.E. Brent, K.K. Bolsen, Ronald V. Pope Jan 2000

Effect Of Level Of Surface-Spoiled Silage On The Nutritive Value Of Corn Silage-Based Rations, L.A. Whitlock, T. Wistuba, M.K. Siefers, B.E. Brent, K.K. Bolsen, Ronald V. Pope

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Twelve ruminally cannulated crossbred steers were used to determine the effects of level of surface-spoiled silages on dry matter (DM) intake and nutrient digestibilities of corn silage-based rations. Irrigated corn was harvested at the 80% milkline stage of maturity and ensiled in 3-ft-deep, pilot-scale, bunker silos and a 9-ft-diameter AgBag®. After 90 days, the bunkers were sealed with a single sheet of polyethylene, and this silage was designated "spoiled". The silage in the AgBag was designated "normal". The four rations contained 90% silage and 10% supplement (DM basis). The silages in the rations were: A) 100% normal; B) 75% normal ...


Effects Of Feeding Two Microbial Additives In Sequence On Growth Performance And Carcass Characteristics Of Finishing Heifers, G.L. Huck, K.K. Kreikemeier, G.A. Ducharme Jan 2000

Effects Of Feeding Two Microbial Additives In Sequence On Growth Performance And Carcass Characteristics Of Finishing Heifers, G.L. Huck, K.K. Kreikemeier, G.A. Ducharme

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Four hundred fifty heifers (846 lb) were used in a 126-day experiment to investigate the effects of feeding two microbial additives, Lactobacillus acidophilus BG2FO4 (MicroCell) and Propionibacterium freudenreichii P-63 (MicroCell PB), alone or in sequence, on feedlot growth performance and carcass characteristics. A 21-day step-up period preceded heifers being placed on a final finishing diet containing 10% corn silage, 42% steam-flaked corn, 42% high-moisture corn, 3% soybean meal, and 3% mineral supplement. Premeasured amounts of microbial additive were mixed with water before being mixed directly with the total ration. Treatments consisted of 1) no microbial additive; 2) MicroCell for the ...


Limiting Amino Acids For Holstein Steers Fed Soybean Hull-Based Diets, R.H. Greenwood, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2000

Limiting Amino Acids For Holstein Steers Fed Soybean Hull-Based Diets, R.H. Greenwood, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A study was conducted to determine the limiting amino acids for cattle fed soybean hullbased diets. Ruminally cannulated Holstein steers (335 lb) were maintained in metabolism crates, fed the same basal diet (73% soyhulls, 19% alfalfa), and given the same intraruminal infusions (400 g/day acetate to increase energy supply without increasing microbial protein supply). Steers were infused into the abomasum with a complete mixture of the 10 essential amino acids or the mixture with histidine; tryptophan; arginine; phenylalanine; or the three branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine) removed. Nitrogen retention was reduced by removal of either histidine or ...


In Vitro Degradation Of Betaine By Ruminal Microbes, C.A. Löest, C.K. Armendariz, Evan C. Titgemeyer Jan 2000

In Vitro Degradation Of Betaine By Ruminal Microbes, C.A. Löest, C.K. Armendariz, Evan C. Titgemeyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

An in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the degradation of betaine sources by rumen microbes. Five sources of betaine (anhydrous betaine, betaine-HCl, feed-grade betaine, lipidcoated betaine, and concentrated separator byproduct) were incubated in rumen fluid collected from steers fed grain- or forage-based diets. In vitro degradation of betaine was slower with the high roughage diet than the grain diet. Betaine from concentrated separator by-product was degraded most rapidly, but no large differences occurred among the other four sources. The disappearance of betaine from lipid-coated product indicates that it did not resist ruminal degradation. Although betaine from all sources was ...


Effects Of Supplementation Of Limit-Fed Growing Diets With Either Soybean Meal Or Nonenzymatically Browned Soybean Meal On Steer Performance, C.M. Coetzer, C.A. Löest, D.J. Bindel, H. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, T.A. Nutsch, James J. Higgins, James S. Drouillard Jan 2000

Effects Of Supplementation Of Limit-Fed Growing Diets With Either Soybean Meal Or Nonenzymatically Browned Soybean Meal On Steer Performance, C.M. Coetzer, C.A. Löest, D.J. Bindel, H. Labrune, R.D. Hunter, T.A. Nutsch, James J. Higgins, James S. Drouillard

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Seventy two individually fed Angus x Hereford steers (642 lb) were used to evaluate the effects of supplementing limit-fed, growing diets with either soybean meal (SBM) or nonenzymatically browned soybean meal (NSBM). Eight steers were allotted to a control diet composed of 39.1% high-moisture corn, 42% cottonseed hulls, 10.4% ground corn, 5% cane molasses 2.25% urea, and 1.5% vitamins and minerals (dry basis). The remaining steers were allotted to diets that derived 100, 80, 60, or 40% of their supplemental protein from SBM or 60, 45, 30, or 15% of their supplemental protein from NSBN. The ...