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Interpreting The Republic As A Protreptic Dialogue, Peter Nielson Moore 2018 University of Kentucky

Interpreting The Republic As A Protreptic Dialogue, Peter Nielson Moore

Theses and Dissertations--Philosophy

Protreptic is a form of rhetoric, textual and oral in form, which exhorts its recipients to reorient their lives both morally and intellectually. Plato frequently portrays Socrates' use of this rhetoric with interlocutors who are enticed by the moral and political views of figures from Athens' intellectual culture. During these conversations Socrates attempts to persuade his interlocutors to reorient their lives in a way that conforms more closely to his own moral and intellectual practice of philosophy. Plato's depiction of protreptic, however, also exerts a protreptic effect on readers of his dialogues. Plato's writing thus performs a dual ...


Laminated Paint, Travis R. Austin 2018 Virginia Commonwealth University

Laminated Paint, Travis R. Austin

Theses and Dissertations

Though we may not perceive it, we are surrounded by material-in-flux. Inert materials degrade and the events that comprise our natural and social environments causally thread into a duration that unifies us in our incomprehension. Sounds reveal ever-present vibrations of the landscape: expressions of the flexuous ground on which we stand.


An Archaeology Of Disbelief: The Origin Of Secular Philosophy, Edward Jayne, Elaine Anderson Jayne 2018 Western Michigan University

An Archaeology Of Disbelief: The Origin Of Secular Philosophy, Edward Jayne, Elaine Anderson Jayne

All Books and Monographs by WMU Authors

An Archaeology of Disbelief traces the origin of secular philosophy to pre-Socratic Greek philosophers who proposed a physical universe without supernatural intervention. Some mentioned the Homeric gods, but others did not. Atomists and Sophists identified themselves as agnostics if not outright atheists, and in reaction Plato featured transcendent spiritual authority. However, Aristotle offered a physical cosmology justified by evidence from a variety of scientific fields. He also revisited many pre-Socratic assumptions by proposing that existence consists of mass in motion without temporal or spatial boundaries. In many ways his analysis anticipated Newton's concept of gravity, Darwin's concept of ...


Theoria As Practice And As Activity, Julie Ward 2018 Loyola University Chicago

Theoria As Practice And As Activity, Julie Ward

Philosophy: Faculty Publications and Other Works

In Book X chapter 7 of Nicomachean Ethics (henceforth, EN), Aristotle reaches two decisive conclusions: frst, the activity of our intellect which he terms θεωρία is the highest kind and comprises “complete happiness” (ἡ τελεῖα εὐδαίμονια, EN 1177a19); second, a theoretical life, being divine, counts as the highest, and is the one to aim at (EN 1178a5-7). These are compelling claims, rightly generating much scholarly comment, particularly about the balance of excellent theoretical and moral activity in the best human life.2 Yet the present paper proposes to follow a diferent standard, one with a broader, thematic approach to θεωρία ...


Sagp Fordham Program 2017 As Of 0ctober 9, Anthony Preus 2017 Binghamton University

Sagp Fordham Program 2017 As Of 0ctober 9, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Sagp Fordham Program 2017, Anthony Preus 2017 Binghamton University

Sagp Fordham Program 2017, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Draft (91117) Program of the 2017 SAGP Annual Meeting at Fordham University Lincoln Center, October 21-22, 2017.


Sense And Sensibility: A Sermon On Living The Examined Life, Sarah J. Mejias 2017 University of New Orleans

Sense And Sensibility: A Sermon On Living The Examined Life, Sarah J. Mejias

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

Jane Austen’s novels remain an essential component of the literary canon, but her first published novel, Sense and Sensibility, is frequently neglected. However, in Sense and Sensibility is the genesis of Austen’s technique through which her major characters cultivate and reveal a strong inner life, demonstrated through the character of Elinor Dashwood. This technique is a characteristic she incorporates in each of her succeeding novels. Her approach to literature centers on the interiority of her characters and their ability to change, but it her first novel Austen takes a unique approach. Following the structure of an eighteenth-century sermon ...


Returning To Reality: Christian Platonism For Our Times, Paul Tyson, Derek A. Michaud 2017 University of Maine

Returning To Reality: Christian Platonism For Our Times, Paul Tyson, Derek A. Michaud

Philosophy Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Differentiating Averroes’ Accounts Of The Metaphysics Of Human Epistemology In His Middle And Long Commentaries On Aristotle’S De Anima, Caleb H A Brown 2017 Liberty University

Differentiating Averroes’ Accounts Of The Metaphysics Of Human Epistemology In His Middle And Long Commentaries On Aristotle’S De Anima, Caleb H A Brown

Montview Liberty University Journal of Undergraduate Research

Averroes (an Islamic Andalusian philosopher in the 12th century) discusses the metaphysics of human epistemology extensively, and his socio-religious context sheds light on this discussion. Several of his works, most prominently his three commentaries on Aristotle’s De Anima, attempt to explain how finite, particular minds interact with universal, eternal intelligibles. Current scholarship focuses on the two longer commentaries, the Middle Commentary and the Long Commentary, but there is no consensus regarding which of these presents Averroes’ final articulation of the metaphysics of human epistemology. Those who maintain that Averroes wrote the Middle Commentary last tend to minimize the ...


Epicurus, Sententia Vaticana Xxiii, Eric A. Brown 2017 Washington University St Louis

Epicurus, Sententia Vaticana Xxiii, Eric A. Brown

Eric A. Brown

Sententia Vaticana 23, as usually emended, says that every friendship is choiceworthy for its own sake. I argue that this sentence should not be attributed to Epicurus. No other evidence supports the attribution of this view to Epicurus, and much other evidence counts strongly against it. It would be better to reject the emendation, so that the sentence says, in somewhat awkward but not entirely unprecedented Greek, that every friendship is by itself a virtue, or to attribute the emended sentence not to Epicurus but to the later, more timid Epicureans who, according to Cicero, conceded more value to friendship ...


Advising The Cosmopolis, Eric A. Brown 2017 Washington University St Louis

Advising The Cosmopolis, Eric A. Brown

Eric A. Brown

Plutarch charges that Stoic theory is inconsistent with Stoic political engagement no matter what they decide to do, because the Stoics' endorsement of the political life is inconsistent with their cosmopolitan rejection of ordinary politics (Stoic.rep., ab init.). Drawing on evidence from Chrysippus and Seneca, I develop an argument that answers this charge, and I draw out two interesting implications of the argument. The first implication is for scholars of ancient Stoicism who like to say that Stoicism is apolitical. The argument I reconstruct turns on the political importance of the practice of giving and taking advice, and in ...


Philosophical Self-Presentation In Late Antique Cappadocia, Stefan Vernon Hodges-Kluck 2017 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Philosophical Self-Presentation In Late Antique Cappadocia, Stefan Vernon Hodges-Kluck

Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation offers a new perspective to the development of religious orthodoxy in the second half of the fourth century CE by examining the role of the body in the inter- and intra-religious battles between Christians and “pagans” over the claim to the cultural capital of philosophy. Focusing on Cappadocia (modern-day central Turkey), a particularly vital region of the fourth-century Roman empire, I argue that during this time, Greek-speaking intellectuals created and disputed boundaries between Christianity and “paganism,” as well as between “orthodoxy” and “heresy,” based on longstanding elite notions of how an ideal philosopher should look, think, and act ...


Identifying And Interpreting A Philosophical Garden At The Villa Of The Papyri At Herculaneum, Antonio Robert LoPiano 2017 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Identifying And Interpreting A Philosophical Garden At The Villa Of The Papyri At Herculaneum, Antonio Robert Lopiano

Masters Theses

The Villa of the Papyri is one of the most important archaeological sites from Roman antiquity for its preserved architecture, library, and art collection. All three of these would be truly remarkable in their own right, but their combined presence in one site has drawn scholars to study the villa for centuries. This thesis contributes to this corpus of work by examining the west peristyle garden at the Villa of the Papyri and proposing the presence of a philosophical garden therein. This hypothesis is supported through analysis of ancient authors, archaeological research of the region, and evidence from the villa ...


The Influence Of Hellenism On The Literary Style Of 1 And 2 Maccabees, Dimitra S. Fellman 2017 Riverdale High School

The Influence Of Hellenism On The Literary Style Of 1 And 2 Maccabees, Dimitra S. Fellman

Young Historians Conference

The Jewish people living within Hellenistic Greece experienced great freedoms, and many assimilated into the non-Jewish societies around them. Yet, under the Seleucid King Antiochus IV in the 2nd century BCE, the Jewish people experienced oppression and persecution, which has been chronicled in the books 1 Maccabees and 2 Maccabees. At a glance, these books appear opposed to the blending of Hellenistic culture and society into surrounding Jewish communities, but a deeper analysis of both texts reveals that the authors depended on Hellenistic constructs to effectively tell their story. This paper explores the degree to which the authors of 1 ...


Sappho's Queer Female History, Tess M. Waxman 2017 Grant High School

Sappho's Queer Female History, Tess M. Waxman

Young Historians Conference

Sappho was a queer woman in ancient Greece. Scholars have researched her sexuality, promiscuity, and sexual orientation, often instead of analyzing her works. Sappho’s poetry provides historians a rare view into the lives of queer women in ancient Greece, shaping the largely untold female LGBTQ history. She introduces a unique viewpoint; she brings complex ideas, such as the justice of Aphrodite, active versus passive lover roles, and erotic culture. Sappho’s distinctly queer poetry is important to explore in an attempt to better understand the past of more people.


The Notion Of Madness In Literature, Philosophy, And Tragedy: Evolving Conceptions Of Mental Illness In Athens, David Z. Bartolome 2017 Clackamas High School

The Notion Of Madness In Literature, Philosophy, And Tragedy: Evolving Conceptions Of Mental Illness In Athens, David Z. Bartolome

Young Historians Conference

It is a basic understanding of modern medicine that mental illness is a disorder of the mind. But from where did this notion originate? In Homer’s popular epics, mental afflictions such as madness and depression are described as divine punishments rather than true mental illness. By the Hellenistic Age, Greek medical journals show a rejection of this divine explanation in favor of the mind. What changed in Greece? This paper tracks the Greek's understanding and conceptualization of madness throughout history and unites disciplines of literature, politics, tragedy, and philosophy to argue that modern understanding of mental illness has ...


How To Attain Liberation From A False World? The Gnostic Myth Of Sophia In Dark City (1998), Fryderyk Kwiatkowski 2017 Jagiellonian University in Kraków

How To Attain Liberation From A False World? The Gnostic Myth Of Sophia In Dark City (1998), Fryderyk Kwiatkowski

Journal of Religion & Film

In the second half of the 20th century, a fascinating revival of ancient Gnostic ideas in American popular culture could be observed. One of the major streams through which Gnostic ideas are transmitted is Hollywood cinema. Many works that emerged at the end of 1990s can be viewed through the ideas of ancient Gnostic systems: The Truman Show (1998), The Thirteenth Floor (1999), The Others (2001), Vanilla Sky (2001) or The Matrix trilogy (1999-2003).

In this article, the author analyses Dark City (1998) and demonstrates that the story depicted in the film is heavily indebted to the Gnostic myth of ...


The Eighth Sacrament? The Evidence Of Hincmar Of Rheims, Doyle M.B. Baxter 2017 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

The Eighth Sacrament? The Evidence Of Hincmar Of Rheims, Doyle M.B. Baxter

Honors Bachelor of Arts

The Catholic Church did not dogmatically define the list of seven sacraments until the Council of Trent in the 16th century, marking the culmination of hundreds of years of theological study and reflection upon sacraments. After the definition of seven, French theologians argued that the coronation of their king was an eighth sacrament. In this paper, I contend that Hincmar of Rheims, his theology of kingship, and the coronation rites that he compiled are likely responsible for the French claim. Hincmar was the Archbishop of Rheims from 845 until his death in 882. During his time as archbishop, he compiled ...


Sagp Newsletter 2016/17.4 Pacific, Anthony Preus 2017 Binghamton University

Sagp Newsletter 2016/17.4 Pacific, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Mode Of Operations: A Critique Of The Agonistic View Of Greek Musical Modes In Plato And Aristotle, Robert Crawford 2017 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH

Mode Of Operations: A Critique Of The Agonistic View Of Greek Musical Modes In Plato And Aristotle, Robert Crawford

Honors Bachelor of Arts

Music has the power to transcend the confines of mere spatial geometry into the bounds of philosophy and emotion. In the views of the ancient philosophers Plato and Aristotle, music, namely the Greek modes, is valuable pedagogically in two ways: first, as a means to knowing the Good, e.g., the Dorian and Phrygian modes, and second as a means for suiting people for political life. Since their goal is to educate future rulers, Plato and Aristotle need to heighten some but censor other musical modes, e.g., the Lydian and Aeolian modes, due to some of the unsavory feelings ...


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