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Sports Medicine Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Sports Medicine

Biomechanical Difference Between Loaded Countermovement And Static Squat Jumps, S. G. S. Coleman, C. Karatzaferi, Michael H. Stone May 2001

Biomechanical Difference Between Loaded Countermovement And Static Squat Jumps, S. G. S. Coleman, C. Karatzaferi, Michael H. Stone

Michael H. Stone

It was the aim of this study to assess differences between countermovement (CMJ) and static (SJ) unloaded and loaded squat jumps. Eight male national/international level athletes and badminton players performed a series of jumps on two Kistler force plates. Maximum vertical force (Fmax) and rate of force development (RFDmax), net impulse (Impnet) and vertical take-off velocity (VT-O) were calculated and compared using a Two-Way (Jump x Load) ANOVA with two repeated factors. Fmax increased significantly with load and displayed a significant interaction with jump type. RFDmax showed significant jump main and interaction effects. Impnet only changed significantly with load ...


Human Performance Lab Newsletter, February 2001, St. Cloud State University Feb 2001

Human Performance Lab Newsletter, February 2001, St. Cloud State University

Human Performance Lab Newsletter

Contents of this issue include:

  • Boomeritis by Julia Devonish
  • Kelly's Corner by David Bacharach
  • The Lowdown on Antioxidants by Steve Vrieze
  • What is Exercise Physiology?
  • 2000-2001 Papers and Abstracts


The Effects Of Four Gymnastics Skills On Vertebral Column Hyperextension In Young Female Gymnasts, Tonia Mcclure Burke Jan 2001

The Effects Of Four Gymnastics Skills On Vertebral Column Hyperextension In Young Female Gymnasts, Tonia Mcclure Burke

Human Movement Sciences Theses & Dissertations

There is very limited information available on the effects of gymnastics skills on spinal hyperextension. Eleven young female gymnasts between the ages of 11 and 15 participated in this study. The subjects height and weight were taken then they were screened for musculoskeletal injuries, normal abdominal and back extensor strength, normal hip flexor and hamstring flexibility, spondylolisthesis, and scoliosis. Hyperextension of the spinal column was measured during normal standing, hyperextending the spine in standing, and during four different gymnastics skills, using the Peak5 motion analysis system. Each subject performed five acceptable trials of four different gymnastics skill including a back ...