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Full-Text Articles in Sports Medicine

'I Think I'M Gonna Hurl': A Narrative Review Of The Causes Of Nausea And Vomiting In Sport, Patrick B. Wilson Jan 2019

'I Think I'M Gonna Hurl': A Narrative Review Of The Causes Of Nausea And Vomiting In Sport, Patrick B. Wilson

Counseling & Human Services Faculty Publications

Exercise-associated gastrointestinal (GI) distress can negatively impact athletic performance and interfere with exercise training. Although there are a few universal underlying causes of GI distress, each symptom often has its own unique triggers and, therefore, its own prevention and management strategies. One of the most troubling GI symptoms an athlete can experience during training and competition is nausea/vomiting. The prevalence of nausea varies with several factors, two of the most important being exercise intensity and duration. Relatively brief, high-intensity exercise (e.g., sprinting, tempo runs) and ultra-endurance exercise are both associated with more frequent and severe nausea. The potential ...


Exercise In The Treatment And Prevention Of Diabetes, Sheri R. Colberg, Carmine R. Grieco Jan 2009

Exercise In The Treatment And Prevention Of Diabetes, Sheri R. Colberg, Carmine R. Grieco

Human Movement Sciences Faculty Publications

The inclusion of regular physical activity is critical for optimal insulin action and glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Current research suggests that Type II diabetes mellitus can be prevented and that all types of diabetes can be controlled with physical activity, largely through improvements in muscular sensitivity to insulin. This article discusses diabetes prevention and the acute and chronic benefits of exercise for individuals with diabetes, along with the importance and impact of aerobic, resistance, or combined training upon glycemic control. To undertake physical activity safely, individuals also must learn optimal management of glycemia.


The Effect Of Intensity Of Aerobic Vo2max Resting Heart Rate And Blood Pressure, Shannan Elizabeth Gormley Jul 2007

The Effect Of Intensity Of Aerobic Vo2max Resting Heart Rate And Blood Pressure, Shannan Elizabeth Gormley

Human Movement Sciences Theses & Dissertations

The AGSM recommends 20 to 60 minutes of continuous or intermittent activity 3 to 5 times per week to maintain cardio respiratory fitness (Pollock et al., 1998). The 1996 Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health indicates that Americans are not meeting these physical activity recommendations (DHHS). Several clear consequences of physical inactivity are the appearance of cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia and obesity. Two recent review articles suggested that higher intensity exercise will elicit a greater reduction in cardiovascular disease risk factors (Swain and Franklin, 2002; Swain and Franklin, 2006). In order to determine ...


Effect Of A Single Bout Of Prior Moderate Exercise On Cutaneous Perfusion In Type 2 Diabetes, Sheri R. Colberg, Henri K. Parson, Tanja Nunnold, D. Robb Holton, Aaron I. Vinik Jan 2006

Effect Of A Single Bout Of Prior Moderate Exercise On Cutaneous Perfusion In Type 2 Diabetes, Sheri R. Colberg, Henri K. Parson, Tanja Nunnold, D. Robb Holton, Aaron I. Vinik

Human Movement Sciences Faculty Publications

In diabetic individuals, increased shunting of circulation away from the skin may exist, contributing to their greater risk for ulcerations and poor cutaneous healing. In a prospective study (1), we previously found a lower skin perfusion during local heating in the foot dorsum of sedentary type 2 diabetic individuals compared with active people without diabetes. This defect was present despite normal increases in skin interstitial nitric oxide (NO), suggesting that NO is either ineffective or not involved (2). A prior bout of maximal exercise also lessened the impaired responsiveness to local heating of the dorsal foot in active type 2 ...


Men, Muscles, And Body Image: Comparisons Of Competitive Bodybuilders, Weight Trainers, And Athletically Active Controls, T. C. Pickett, R. J. Lewis, T. F. Cash, H. G. Pope Jan 2005

Men, Muscles, And Body Image: Comparisons Of Competitive Bodybuilders, Weight Trainers, And Athletically Active Controls, T. C. Pickett, R. J. Lewis, T. F. Cash, H. G. Pope

Psychology Faculty Publications

Objectives: To investigate body image and psychosocial adjustment among competitive bodybuilders, non-competitive weight trainers, and athletically active men.

Methods: Participants were 40 men in each of the three groups who were assessed on body composition and multiple facets of body image evaluation, investment and anxiety, eating attitudes, and social self esteem.

Results: Relative to the other two groups, competitive bodybuilders had greater body mass due to fat-free body mass. Although groups did not differ in their situational body image discomfort, competitive bodybuilders and weight trainers had a more positive global appearance evaluation and were more psychologically invested in their physical ...


Determining The Validity Of A New Cycle Ergometer Protocol For Estimating Vo(2)Max, James Allen Parrott Apr 2003

Determining The Validity Of A New Cycle Ergometer Protocol For Estimating Vo(2)Max, James Allen Parrott

Human Movement Sciences Theses & Dissertations

The current American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) submaximal cycle ergometer protocol has been evaluated by several researchers for its validity in estimating maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). It has been found that the ACSM protocol overestimates VO2max by 28% on average (Swain and Wright, 1997). It is felt that the short stage duration, only 3 minutes, of the ACSM protocol is largely responsible for this overestimation. The new submaximal cycle ergometer protocol evaluated here utilizes a 6-minute stage in an attempt to reduce the overestimation of VO2max while increasing the overall test validity.

A regression performed ...


The Effects Of Four Gymnastics Skills On Vertebral Column Hyperextension In Young Female Gymnasts, Tonia Mcclure Burke Jan 2001

The Effects Of Four Gymnastics Skills On Vertebral Column Hyperextension In Young Female Gymnasts, Tonia Mcclure Burke

Human Movement Sciences Theses & Dissertations

There is very limited information available on the effects of gymnastics skills on spinal hyperextension. Eleven young female gymnasts between the ages of 11 and 15 participated in this study. The subjects height and weight were taken then they were screened for musculoskeletal injuries, normal abdominal and back extensor strength, normal hip flexor and hamstring flexibility, spondylolisthesis, and scoliosis. Hyperextension of the spinal column was measured during normal standing, hyperextending the spine in standing, and during four different gymnastics skills, using the Peak5 motion analysis system. Each subject performed five acceptable trials of four different gymnastics skill including a back ...


Acute Blood Pressure Responses To Static And Dynamic Exercise: Racial Differences, Reuben Leon Wright Apr 1998

Acute Blood Pressure Responses To Static And Dynamic Exercise: Racial Differences, Reuben Leon Wright

Theses and Dissertations in Urban Services - Urban Education

African Americans have a higher incidence of hypertension than other racial groups. Furthermore, some research suggests that normotensive individuals who exhibit exaggerated blood pressure (BP) responses to exercise may be at risk for future hypertension. This study sought to determine if normotensive African Americans exhibited exaggerated BP responses to static exercise or dynamic exercise relative to Caucasian Americans and Asian Americans. Thirty normotensive subjects participated from each of the three racial groups (15 males and 15 females). Subjects held 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (right knee extension) for 3 minutes, and BP was recorded during the third minute. On a ...