Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Aquaculture and Fisheries Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Aquaculture and Fisheries

Toward A Working- Waterfront Ethic: Preserving Access To Maine’S Coastal Economy, Heritage, And Local Seafood, Robert Snyder Jan 2011

Toward A Working- Waterfront Ethic: Preserving Access To Maine’S Coastal Economy, Heritage, And Local Seafood, Robert Snyder

Maine Policy Review

Maine has one of the most beautiful coastlines in the world, one for which people are willing to pay a premium. But for Maine fisherman, the coast is how they access their liveli­hood. In 2002 only 25 miles of Maine’s 5,300-mile coastline supported working-waterfront access. This article discusses creative and innovative strategies to preserve Maine’s working waterfront, including current-use taxation, purchase of development rights, and community-supported fisheries (CSF).


Building A Sustainable Seafood System For Maine, Robin Alden Jan 2011

Building A Sustainable Seafood System For Maine, Robin Alden

Maine Policy Review

In this article, Robin Alden notes that Maine could have one of the premier marine food systems in the world. However, that means adequate steward­ship of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem and diversifying the fishing industry beyond lobster by creating innovative public policy and a food system that supports community fishing.


By Land And By Sea, Amanda Beal Jan 2011

By Land And By Sea, Amanda Beal

Maine Policy Review

This short article discusses the results of the By Land and By Sea project, in which Maine fishermen and farmers came together to discuss common concerns and to forge new solutions aimed at re-envisioning a unified food system.


Fish Or Foul? Will Aquaculture Carve Out A Niche In The Gulf Of Maine?, Philip W. Conkling Jan 2000

Fish Or Foul? Will Aquaculture Carve Out A Niche In The Gulf Of Maine?, Philip W. Conkling

Maine Policy Review

Despite early promise and an optimal environment, aquaculture has grown more slowly in Maine than it has in other parts of the United States and the world. As Philip Conkling explains, this is due to market forces, scientific and technical issues, cultural opposition, and, more recently, the threat of an endangered species listing for Atlantic salmon. While near-term prospects for significant expansion of the industry appear bleak, Conkling suggests that a fresh generation of pioneers may be able to carve out a new niche, but only by conducting “old fashioned” research and development—on the job, on the water, and ...


Evolution Of The Maine Lobster Co-Management Law, James Acheson, Terry Stockwell, James A. Wilson Jan 2000

Evolution Of The Maine Lobster Co-Management Law, James Acheson, Terry Stockwell, James A. Wilson

Maine Policy Review

In fisheries management circles, there is growing realization that traditional ways of managing marine resources are not working and that new approaches to management need to be tried. One of the most promising of these new approaches is co-management, where authority for managing fish stocks is shared between the industry and government agencies. This paper discusses the implementation of the new co-management system, which was initiated in the Maine lobster industry in 1995. The law has clearly been successful; it has been framed in a way to allow lobster fishermen to be able to generate rules to constrain their own ...


Developing A Cooperative Research Agenda For Maine’S Commercial Fisheries, Robin Alden, Linda Mercer Jan 2000

Developing A Cooperative Research Agenda For Maine’S Commercial Fisheries, Robin Alden, Linda Mercer

Maine Policy Review

This past year the Maine Department of Marine Resources sponsored a unique series of meetings involving fishermen, academic and government scientists, and fishery managers. The goal was to define a shared research agenda for Maine’s marine fisheries. Robin Alden and Linda Mercer summarize the results of these meetings. In doing so they address the question: “What do we need to know to properly manage Maine's major marine resources?” Alden and Mercer also conclude that the collaborative process these meetings helped to establish is one of the keys to the successful management of Maine’s marine resources.


Measuring Maine’S Marine Economy, Brian Roach, Jonathan Rubin, Charles Morrris Jan 1999

Measuring Maine’S Marine Economy, Brian Roach, Jonathan Rubin, Charles Morrris

Maine Policy Review

Even though Maine’s new license plate no longer features the lobster, the ocean remains central to Maine’s identity and to its economy. As the authors point out, Maine has more than 4,500 miles of coastline and more than 4,600 islands over one acre in size. For many who live here, their way of life is tied to the sea; for many who visit Maine, their stay is tied to the sea. Despite such prominence, it has been difficult to accurately assess the importance of Maine’s marine economy. In part, this is because there clear definition ...


Charting A Course For The Future Of Maine's Fisheries: An Interview With Commissioner Robin Alden, Robin Alden Jan 1996

Charting A Course For The Future Of Maine's Fisheries: An Interview With Commissioner Robin Alden, Robin Alden

Maine Policy Review

In a January, 1996 interview, Commissioner of the Maine Department of Marine Resources, Robin Alden shared her concerns about the direction of federal fisheries management and her goals for building a more dynamic and self-managing system here in Maine. In particular, Alden described the recent legislation which creates zone councils and an apprenticeship system in Maine’s lobster fishery. Alden articulated a direction for Maine’s fisheries that challenges conventional fisheries management and as such, is being watched closely by fisheries managers in Maine as well as elsewhere in the U.S. and overseas.


Options For Managing Maine’S Fisheries: Traditional Fisheries Management, Ralph Townsend Jan 1996

Options For Managing Maine’S Fisheries: Traditional Fisheries Management, Ralph Townsend

Maine Policy Review

Ralph Townsend discusses the historic evolution of fisheries management as well as more current trends toward co-management in Maine’s groundfisheries. Looking at successful experiences with co-management, he wonders whether current efforts in Maine’s lobster industry will be successful without tackling the tough issue of access limitation.


Options For Managing Maine’S Fisheries: Fisheries Management From An Ecological Perspective, James A. Wilson Jan 1996

Options For Managing Maine’S Fisheries: Fisheries Management From An Ecological Perspective, James A. Wilson

Maine Policy Review

Jim Wilson counters the concerns raised by Ralph Townsend [this issue].The current policy course set by Marine Resources Commissioner Robin Alden is based on an approach to fisheries management which redefines the sustainability problem as an ecosystem problem. Wilson argues that, within this new paradigm, questions such as “how, when, and where” to fish (or not fish) are much more central than species-specific quota setting. These questions not only change the rules under which co-management is implemented but also may improve fisheries management in ways that quota systems have failed, that is the long term conservation of species and ...