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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Antitrust Jurisprudence Of Neil Gorsuch, John M. Newman Sep 2917

The Antitrust Jurisprudence Of Neil Gorsuch, John M. Newman

Florida State University Law Review

In 2017, the U.S. Senate confirmed Neil M. Gorsuch’s nomination to serve on the Supreme Court. Like Justice Stevens before him, Gorsuch’s primary area of expertise is anti-trust law. Like Stevens, Gorsuch both practiced and taught in the field before joining the bench. As a judge for the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, Gorsuch penned multiple substantive antitrust opinions.

His unique expertise will likely situate Gorsuch as one of the Court’s leading voices on antitrust matters for decades to come. A close examination of his prior antitrust opinions thus offers vital insight into his approach to antitrust principles and execution. …


Teschner V. Commissioner, 38 T.C. ... No. 101 (1962), Harry A. Haines Jan 2063

Teschner V. Commissioner, 38 T.C. ... No. 101 (1962), Harry A. Haines

Montana Law Review

Teschner v. Commissioner


The Unfulfilled Promise Of Environmental Constitutionalism, Amber Polk Dec 2023

The Unfulfilled Promise Of Environmental Constitutionalism, Amber Polk

Hastings Law Journal

The political push for the adoption of state-level “green amendments” in the United States has gained significant traction in just the last couple of years. Green amendments add an environmental right to a state’s constitution. Five such amendments were made in the 1970s in Pennsylvania, Montana, Hawaii, Massachusetts, and Illinois. This Article looks in depth at the case law that has developed the contours of these constitutional environmental rights in the wake of the political revival of environmental constitutionalism in the United States. I distill two lessons from this jurisprudence. First, constitutional environmental rights are interpreted by the courts as …


“Cancel Culture” And Criminal Justice, Steven Arrigg Koh Dec 2023

“Cancel Culture” And Criminal Justice, Steven Arrigg Koh

Hastings Law Journal

This Article explores the relationship between two normative systems in modern society: “cancel culture” and criminal justice. It argues that cancel culture—a ubiquitous phenomenon in contemporary life—may rectify deficiencies of over- and under-enforcement in the U.S. criminal justice system. However, the downsides of cancel culture’s structure—imprecise factfinding, potentially disproportionate sanctions leading to collateral consequences, a “thin” conception of the wrongdoer as beyond rehabilitation, and a broader cultural anxiety that “chills” certain human conduct—reflect problematic U.S. punitive impulses that characterize our era of mass incarceration. This Article thus argues that social media reform proposals obscure a deeper necessity: transcendence of blame …


A Unique Path To Nationwide Paid Family And Medical Leave: Through The U.S. States, Yan Goodwin Jan 2023

A Unique Path To Nationwide Paid Family And Medical Leave: Through The U.S. States, Yan Goodwin

DePaul Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Absurd Pandemonium Surrounding Spacs: An Argument In Favor Of Legislative And Judicial Restraint, Eric D. Guenther Jan 2023

The Absurd Pandemonium Surrounding Spacs: An Argument In Favor Of Legislative And Judicial Restraint, Eric D. Guenther

DePaul Law Review

No abstract provided.


Segregation On-Demand: Limiting Discriminatory Municipal Incorporations, Shai Stern Jan 2023

Segregation On-Demand: Limiting Discriminatory Municipal Incorporations, Shai Stern

DePaul Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reflections On Establishing The Depaul Law Review, Allen Moye Jan 2023

Reflections On Establishing The Depaul Law Review, Allen Moye

DePaul Law Review

No abstract provided.


Volume 72, Issue I Cover Matter Jan 2023

Volume 72, Issue I Cover Matter

DePaul Law Review

No abstract provided.


Covid-19 Policies & Their Impact On Housing And Health Outcomes In The City Of Chicago, Khushbu Patel Jan 2023

Covid-19 Policies & Their Impact On Housing And Health Outcomes In The City Of Chicago, Khushbu Patel

DePaul Journal of Health Care Law

The COVID-19 mandates and policies that were implemented by both the state of Illinois and the City of Chicago, such as the eviction moratorium, dramatically improved health outcomes by alleviating the financial stress of many households. Discussing social determinants of health and evaluating the impact that each social determinant had on housing and health outcomes allows for an in-depth look at the overall concept of housing in Chicago and the health outcomes of low-income individuals. Comparing the housing laws in place before COVID-19 at the federal, state, and local levels allows for analyzing the impact of the COVID-19 policies and …


A Case For Brandeisian Federalism: The Erisa Preemption Clause And State Health Care Reform, Jordan May Jan 2023

A Case For Brandeisian Federalism: The Erisa Preemption Clause And State Health Care Reform, Jordan May

DePaul Journal of Health Care Law

The United States spends more for health care per capita than any other country in the world. Despite spending more, the United States has weaker health care outcomes than other similarly developed countries. This fact alone makes health care an important subject for policy reform. Given the current partisan gridlock in Congress, it is difficult to foresee any significant legislation in the area of health care reform at the federal level in the near future. As a result, Congress has allocated major health care reform efforts to the states. However, ERISA stands as a huge obstacle to state health care …


After Fifty Years Of The War On Drugs, The Nation Looks West: Why Oregon Required The Drug Addiction Treatment And Recovery Act And What We Can Learn From It, Cailin Harrington Jan 2023

After Fifty Years Of The War On Drugs, The Nation Looks West: Why Oregon Required The Drug Addiction Treatment And Recovery Act And What We Can Learn From It, Cailin Harrington

Seton Hall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents Jan 2023

Table Of Contents

Seton Hall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reducing Fragmentation: A Transparent And Efficient Approach To The American Health Care System, Annie Lucatuorto Jan 2023

Reducing Fragmentation: A Transparent And Efficient Approach To The American Health Care System, Annie Lucatuorto

Seton Hall Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Truth About Falsity: “Dueling Experts” And Why The False Claims Act Requires Proof Of An Objective Falsity, Rachel L. Leung Jan 2023

The Truth About Falsity: “Dueling Experts” And Why The False Claims Act Requires Proof Of An Objective Falsity, Rachel L. Leung

Seton Hall Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Electoral Count Act: “Regularly Given,” The Denominator Problem, And The 101st Vote, Thomas "T.J." Kingeter Jan 2023

The Electoral Count Act: “Regularly Given,” The Denominator Problem, And The 101st Vote, Thomas "T.J." Kingeter

Seton Hall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Deregulation: Too Big For One Branch, But Maybe Not For Two, Stephen M. Johnson Jan 2023

Deregulation: Too Big For One Branch, But Maybe Not For Two, Stephen M. Johnson

Seton Hall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Citizenship, Assimilation, And The Insular Cases: Reversing The Tide Of Cultural Protectionism At American Samoa, Jason Buhi Jan 2023

Citizenship, Assimilation, And The Insular Cases: Reversing The Tide Of Cultural Protectionism At American Samoa, Jason Buhi

Seton Hall Law Review

No abstract provided.


White Christian Nationalism Enters The Political Mainstream: Implications For The Roberts Court And Religious Freedom, Stephen M. Feldman Jan 2023

White Christian Nationalism Enters The Political Mainstream: Implications For The Roberts Court And Religious Freedom, Stephen M. Feldman

Seton Hall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Witness Hide-And-Seek: Why Federal Prosecutors Should Record Pretrial Interviews, Christina M. Frohock, Jeffrey E. Marcus Jan 2023

Witness Hide-And-Seek: Why Federal Prosecutors Should Record Pretrial Interviews, Christina M. Frohock, Jeffrey E. Marcus

Seton Hall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Paternalism In International Human Rights Law, Lucas Lixinski, Noam Peleg Jan 2023

Paternalism In International Human Rights Law, Lucas Lixinski, Noam Peleg

Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law

This article argues that international human rights law (IHRL) at a system-wide level produces paternalistic effects that undermine the work it is meant to do for rightsholders. Analyzing the work of four key United Nations human rights treaty bodies, we show how institutional arrangements exclude rightsholders from having a say on their own interests in what IHRL should mean for them, and we are instead left with a body of norms, guidelines, and institutions with self-serving dynamics that reinforce the position of IHRL institutions and only secondarily benefit rightsholders.


Law Over Legalism: International Court Legitimacy In Lautsi V. Italy, Sebastián Guidi Jan 2023

Law Over Legalism: International Court Legitimacy In Lautsi V. Italy, Sebastián Guidi

Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law

2009 brought an existential crisis to the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). In November, it unanimously ordered Italy to remove crucifixes from public schools. Backlash was unprecedented. The government promptly announced it would not comply. Politicians and social actors all across the political spectrum harshly criticized the decision and bashed the Court. Ten European countries joined Italy in referring the case to the Grand Chamber of the Court, which reversed the decision in 2011. The storm abated. Lautsi v. Italy likely received the most public attention of any ECtHR judgment. Much of the Court’s subsequent case-law was decided with …


New Perspectives On Iran: The Path To Progressive Family Law Before The Islamic Revolution, Neeki Memarzadeh Jan 2023

New Perspectives On Iran: The Path To Progressive Family Law Before The Islamic Revolution, Neeki Memarzadeh

Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law

A progressive Iranian women's rights movement has slipped through the cracks of mainstream scholarship. In the 1960s, Iranian women rallied for progressive family law reforms; their efforts culminated in the Family Protection Law of 1967. This note provides an alternative view of the women's rights movement in the Middle East and highlights how a social movement gave rise to comprehensive and progressive family law reform. Over the last century, Iran has been under authoritarian rule, first in the form of a monarchy and now in a theocracy. In spite of this, Iranian women have been steadfast in the fight for …


Federal Recognition Of Native American Tribes In The United States And The International Right To Self-Determination: Why Congress Should Exercise Its Constitutional Authority To Federally Recognize The Lumbee Tribe, James Ennis Street Jan 2023

Federal Recognition Of Native American Tribes In The United States And The International Right To Self-Determination: Why Congress Should Exercise Its Constitutional Authority To Federally Recognize The Lumbee Tribe, James Ennis Street

Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law

Native American tribal nations covet state and federal tribal recognition. The Lumbee Tribe is one of those tribes. Though North Carolina has granted the Lumbee Tribe State recognition, the Lumbee Tribe's 134-year-long quest for Federal recognition has not been successful. Neither of the two types of Federal Recognition – Administrative and Congressional – have permitted the Lumbee Tribe to benefit alongside the other federally-recognized Tribes from increased respect, sovereignty, and resources. Instead, the Lumbee Tribe has been spun around by the regulatory recognition rigmarole.

In this article, I first explore arguments for and against federal recognition of the Lumbee Tribe. …


Journal Staff Jan 2023

Journal Staff

Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law

No abstract provided.


The Immigration Shadow Docket, Faiza W. Sayed Jan 2023

The Immigration Shadow Docket, Faiza W. Sayed

Northwestern University Law Review

Each year, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA)—the Justice Department’s appellate immigration agency that reviews decisions of immigration judges and decides the fate of thousands of noncitizens—issues about thirty published, precedential decisions. At present, these are the only decisions out of approximately 30,000 each year, that are readily available to the public and provide detailed reasoning for their conclusions. This is because most of the BIA’s decision-making happens on what this Article terms the “immigration shadow docket”—the tens of thousands of other decisions the BIA issues each year that are unpublished and nonprecedential. These shadow docket decisions are generally authored …


Consequences And The Supreme Court, Aaron Tang Jan 2023

Consequences And The Supreme Court, Aaron Tang

Northwestern University Law Review

May the Supreme Court consider consequences when it decides the hard cases that divide us? The conventional wisdom is that it may not. Scholars have argued, for example, that consequentialism is a paradigmatic “anti-modal” form of reasoning at the Court. And the Court itself has declared that “consequences cannot change our understanding of the law.”

This Article presents evidence of a possible shift in the standard account. Although many kinds of consequentialist arguments remain forbidden, such as naked judicial efforts to maximize social utility, a particular form of consequentialism is now surprisingly common when the Supreme Court confronts hard cases. …


The Counterdemocratic Difficulty, Aziz Z. Huq Jan 2023

The Counterdemocratic Difficulty, Aziz Z. Huq

Northwestern University Law Review

Since the 2020 elections, debate about the Supreme Court’s relationship with the mechanisms of national democracy has intensified. One important thread of that debate focuses critically on the possibility of a judicial decision flipping a presidential election or thwarting the will of national majorities respecting progressive legislation, and pushes concerns about the Court’s effect on national democracy. A narrow focus on specific interventions, however, does not exhaust the subtle and consequential ways in which the Court influences whether and how the American democratic system thrives or fails. A narrow focus is partial because it construes democracy as merely the aggregation …


Defining Interim Storage Of Nuclear Waste, Max Johnson Jan 2023

Defining Interim Storage Of Nuclear Waste, Max Johnson

Northwestern University Law Review

Nuclear power may be humanity’s best hope to curb climate-altering greenhouse gas emissions. But public fear of its dangers, including the toxicity of nuclear waste, undermines its expansion. To provide for more effective waste disposal, in 2021 and 2022 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recommended licensing two privately-owned nuclear waste storage facilities—called Consolidated Interim Storage Facilities (CISFs)—to be built in New Mexico and in Texas. Both states vehemently oppose the construction and operation of these facilities: legislators in both states have proposed state laws opposing them, and both states have sued the NRC challenging the legality of the facilities’ licensure. …


The Misunderstood History Of Textualism, Tara Leigh Grove Jan 2023

The Misunderstood History Of Textualism, Tara Leigh Grove

Northwestern University Law Review

This Article challenges widespread assumptions about the history of textualism. Jurists and scholars have sought for decades to distinguish “modern textualism” from the so-called “plain meaning school” of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—an approach that both textualists and non-textualists alike have long viewed as improperly “literal” and “wooden.” This Article shows that this conventional historical account is incorrect. Based on a study of statutory cases from 1789 to 1945 that use the term “plain meaning” or similar terms, this Article reveals that, under the actual plain meaning approach, the Supreme Court did not ignore context but looked to …