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The Shakers Of Canterbury: Their Agriculture And Their Machinery, Elizabeth Gleason Bervy 2010 Hamilton College

The Shakers Of Canterbury: Their Agriculture And Their Machinery, Elizabeth Gleason Bervy

American Communal Societies Quarterly

From the very first years of the existence of this Society, the people were industrious and hard working. Their founder and spiritual leader, Ann Lee, had instructed them, “Put your hands to work and your heart to God.” There was a pervasive concern for quality in every form of production among the Shakers, as well as for honesty in dealing with the world in the selling of their products.

Shaker farms were models of efficiency and orderliness and greatly admired by agricultural experts. From the early nineteenth century on, they implemented revolutionary agricultural practices: whenever possible they endorsed the use ...


What Lies Beneath? Contemporary Notions Of Multiculturalism And Their Impact On Irish And American Immigrant Communities, Amanda Nelson 2010 Macalester College

What Lies Beneath? Contemporary Notions Of Multiculturalism And Their Impact On Irish And American Immigrant Communities, Amanda Nelson

American Studies Honors Projects

This thesis explores the contested contemporary political and social uses of the term "multiculturalism" in American and Irish rhetoric and public policy, and interrogates how its multiple uses have influenced immigration law and created tensions among immigrant enclaves and communities in both countries. The concept of multiculturalism is an overused explanation for massive waves of immigration and the various multi-ethnic and multi-national communities that inhabit local and global communities. Many individuals assume multiculturalism's popularity in contemporary discourse is a positive indication of less racist and more culturally inclusive societies. The term is often treated as a political and/or ...


Review Of Class And Race In The Frontier Army: Military Life In The West, 1870-1890 By Kevin Adams, Samuel Watson 2010 United States Military Academy

Review Of Class And Race In The Frontier Army: Military Life In The West, 1870-1890 By Kevin Adams, Samuel Watson

Great Plains Quarterly

Class and Race in the Frontier Army is social history first, military second. Adams has two theses: that an "enormous class division" trumped ethnicity, but not race, and that military historians have sought comfort in depicting the army as socially isolated, a unique institution. A book so critical deserves critique; Class and Race is both a laudable effort to connect military to social history, and a product of late twentieth-century graduate school, producing focused insights and reminding us of the big picture, but leaving the mid-level blurry. Adams's historiographical undertone is that whiteness scholars have exaggerated the racialization of ...


Review Of The Indian Craze: Primitivism, Modernism, And Transculturation In American Art, 1890-1915 By Elizabeth Hutchinson, Linda M. Waggoner 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Review Of The Indian Craze: Primitivism, Modernism, And Transculturation In American Art, 1890-1915 By Elizabeth Hutchinson, Linda M. Waggoner

Great Plains Quarterly

Elizabeth Hutchinson's The Indian Craze examines the trend that was not merely "fad or fancy" but "a significant artistic phenomenon with lasting effects on both American art history and U.S. Indian policy." Although the origin of Native American art as art is commonly associated with the Santa Fe movement of the 1920s and 1930s, Hutchinson declares that "this cross-cultural conversation," fueled by progressive primitivism, began at least two decades earlier.

Enhanced by historical images and informed by Janet C. Berlo's anthology, The Early Years of Native American Art History (1992), The Indian Craze revives a politically charged ...


Review Of Agnes Lake Hickok: Queen Of The Circus, Wife Of A Legend By Linda A. Fisher And Carrie Bowers, Kim Warren 2010 University of Kansas

Review Of Agnes Lake Hickok: Queen Of The Circus, Wife Of A Legend By Linda A. Fisher And Carrie Bowers, Kim Warren

Great Plains Quarterly

Agnes Lake Hickok rode horses, walked on slack wires, and trained various animals. If that was not enough, she was also a smart, diligent entrepreneur who became the first woman to own and operate a circus in the United States. The circus business brought her a busy schedule, some profitable opportunities, and wide acclaim as an entertainer who traveled with legendary performers P. T. Barnum and Buffalo Bill Cody. Although Agnes Lake Hickok did not necessarily invent circus shows, she certainly helped to popularize this form of entertainment in the nineteenth century and prepared the next generation of performers, including ...


Review Of Staking Her Claim: Women Homesteading The West By Marcia Meredith Hensley, Sandra Schackel 2010 Boise State University

Review Of Staking Her Claim: Women Homesteading The West By Marcia Meredith Hensley, Sandra Schackel

Great Plains Quarterly

Since the republication of Letters of a Woman Homesteader in 1982, Elinore Pruitt Stewart's descriptions of homesteading near Burnt Fork, Wyoming, have served as a model for the single woman's homesteading experience. Although Pruitt held her homestead for barely a week before marrying her employer Clyde Stewart, her letters shaped our notions of the homestead experience in the early twentieth century. Staking Her Claim: Women Homesteading the West, a collection of twentieth-century homesteading accounts, many of them in the Great Plains region, greatly expands this genre.

A newcomer to Wyoming in 1983, author Marcia Meredith Hensley recognized that ...


Review Of Charles Fritz: 100 Paintings Illustrating The Journals Of Lewis And Clark: The Complete Collection By Charles Fritz, Rock Hushka 2010 Tacoma Art Museum

Review Of Charles Fritz: 100 Paintings Illustrating The Journals Of Lewis And Clark: The Complete Collection By Charles Fritz, Rock Hushka

Great Plains Quarterly

The traditional Lewis and Clark buff will find much enjoyment in Charles Fritz: 100 Paintings Illustrating the Journals of Lewis and Clark: The Complete Collection. Fritz's delineation gives accurate impressions of the majesty of diverse topographies, ranging from the low-slung prairies of Nebraska to the rugged mountain chains at the Great Divide. His depictions of the North Dakota winter convey the special quality of light produced only by the frigid stillness of the High Plains. Fritz has an extraordinary ability to paint water, from the slow grace of the Missouri River to the thundering falls on the Columbia to ...


Review Of Music Of The First Nations: Tradition And Innovation In Native North America Edited By Tara Browner, Anna Hoefnagels 2010 Carleton University

Review Of Music Of The First Nations: Tradition And Innovation In Native North America Edited By Tara Browner, Anna Hoefnagels

Great Plains Quarterly

This collection of nine essays examines diverse traditions and issues in contemporary Native American music from a variety of perspectives. The anthology also covers a wide geographic span, ranging from the Inuits of northern Canada to the Choctaws of Mississippi, and the Passamaquoddies of New Brunswick in eastern Canada to the Coast Salish of western Washington. Many of these chapters highlight the movement of Aboriginal people and their music, as well as the transformations and retentions that characterized these movements and interactions with other Aboriginal groups and European settlers. An article addressing intertribal powwow music and another on country music ...


Review Of William Wayne Red Hat, Jr.: Cheyenne Keeper Of The Arrows By William Wayne Red Hat, Jr., Christina Gish Hall 2010 Iowa State University

Review Of William Wayne Red Hat, Jr.: Cheyenne Keeper Of The Arrows By William Wayne Red Hat, Jr., Christina Gish Hall

Great Plains Quarterly

In an attempt to add a Cheyenne voice to the voluminous literature published about this Great Plains Indian nation, Sibylle M. Schlesier has come together with William Wayne Red Hat, Jr. to produce a text that transcribes this Cheyenne Arrow Keeper's multiple personal narratives, ranging in topics from his experiences in Vietnam to his religious role in his community to ruminations on Cheyenne history, culture, and oral tradition. As the daughter of anthropologist Karl Schlesier, Schlesier was in a unique position to collaborate with Red Hat, Jr., having known the Red Hat family from childhood. Since Red Hat, Jr ...


Review Of Survivance: Narratives Of Native Presence Edited By Gerald Vizenor, Lisa Cole 2010 University of Northern British Columbia

Review Of Survivance: Narratives Of Native Presence Edited By Gerald Vizenor, Lisa Cole

Great Plains Quarterly

Gerald Vizenor's concept of survivance, first introduced in Manifest Manners (1994), articulates a means of conceiving new expressions of Native life, free from the simulated "Indian," thereby highlighting the cultural value of precontact history. In this anthology, eighteen scholars variously acknowledge Vizenor's contribution of survivance to literary analysis and the wide-ranging applications of his insights to contexts such as language, race, and culture.

Vizenor functions as both a contributor to and editor for this volume. His organization of the chapters is particularly noteworthy in the intricate ways each one relates to those in close proximity. Thus, he enters ...


Review Of We Are All Treaty People: Prairie Essays By Roger Epp. Edmonton, J. William Brennan 2010 University of Regina

Review Of We Are All Treaty People: Prairie Essays By Roger Epp. Edmonton, J. William Brennan

Great Plains Quarterly

In the aftermath of the 1996 release of the massive report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, and Canada's subsequent official statement of regret for the "Indian policies" that successive governments have pursued down to our own day, "We Are All Treaty People: History, Reconciliation and the 'Settler Problem'" is arguably this book's most provocative essay. Roger Epp begins by asserting that the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Euro-Canadian settlers who came afterward "constitutes a ... powerful common history, inherited, not chosen, whose birthright we can either disavow, because its burdens are too great, or else make ...


Book Review: Spirited Encounters: American Indians Protest Museum Policies And Practices By Karen Coody Cooper, Majel Boxer 2010 Fort Lewis College

Book Review: Spirited Encounters: American Indians Protest Museum Policies And Practices By Karen Coody Cooper, Majel Boxer

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

In recent years a number of related academic fields have explored the connections between museums and Indigenous peoples. The growth in published monographs and edited volumes has in part been spurred on by the 2004 opening of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC. This monograph raises significant questions and reveals numerous debates surrounding such issues as ownership and access to museum collections and archives; the repatriation of human remains, funerary items, and cultural patrimony; Native American traditional and modern art and art museums; the need for consultation and collaboration with Indigenous peoples and communities; and the ...


Book Review: Health Care In Saskatchewan: An Analytical Profile By Gregory Marchildon And Kevin O’Fee, Kelly Chessie 2010 University of Saskatchewan

Book Review: Health Care In Saskatchewan: An Analytical Profile By Gregory Marchildon And Kevin O’Fee, Kelly Chessie

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

Marchildon and O’Fee set out to provide a detailed description of the Saskatchewan health care system, integrating details of how health care is organized, funded, and delivered in this Canadian prairie province. To accomplish their goal of fostering a better understanding of the provincial health system and its inputs and outcomes, they walk their readers through a thicket of details, including standings on health status indicators; macrolevel organizational structures; financing and expenditures; range of services, resources and technologies; and a sample of semirecent health reforms. They then close with a brief assessment of the system’s performance.

What the ...


Book Review: Kiowa Ethnogeography By William C. Meadows, Michael P. Jordan 2010 University of Oklahoma

Book Review: Kiowa Ethnogeography By William C. Meadows, Michael P. Jordan

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

With his latest book Meadows has made a significant contribution to our understanding of Native American ethnogeography. Comprehensive in scope, the work addresses the Kiowa people’s evolving relationship to the land from their initial migration from the headwaters of the Yellowstone River to contemporary life in rural southwestern Oklahoma. Meadows demonstrates that the Kiowa people have maintained a sense of homeland throughout two episodes of migration, confinement to a reservation, and the allotment of tribal lands in 1901. After providing a useful overview of research on Native American ethnogeography, he delves into a discussion of Kiowa interactions with the ...


Book Review: Colorado Water Law For Non-Lawyers By P. Andrew Jones And Tom Cech, Glenn Patterson 2010 Colorado State University

Book Review: Colorado Water Law For Non-Lawyers By P. Andrew Jones And Tom Cech, Glenn Patterson

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

Water touches the lives of all of us every day, and so, at least indirectly, do the rules that govern its allocation. Since the days of the Anasazi, and of the northern Mexican communities of irrigated farms, and especially since the 1859 gold rush, Colorado has been a leader in the development of water law in the arid West. For years, interested lay readers have faced an important gap when searching for information about Colorado water law. Justice Greg Hobbs’s Citizen’s Guide to Colorado Water Law, 3rd ed. (2009) is well written and helpful, but by design is ...


Book Review: Silent Victims: Hate Crimes Against Native Americans By Barbara Perry, Beth R. Ritter 2010 University of Nebraska at Omaha

Book Review: Silent Victims: Hate Crimes Against Native Americans By Barbara Perry, Beth R. Ritter

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

Anyone familiar with Indian Country and the endemic racism and discrimination—on and off the reservations—that persist for Native Americans in the United States might assume that hate crimes perpetuated against this population are not only common but also well documented. As Barbara Perry provocatively establishes, only the former is true: Native Americans are subjected routinely to ethnoviolence, yet they rarely report these transgressions. In fact, according to Perry, Native Americans reported only 83 incidences of hate crimes in 2004 (< 1% of all reported hate crimes that year).

Perry explores several explanations for this apparent anomaly, including traditional Native cultural values of nonconfrontation. Her thesis, however, focuses ...


Book Review: Thunder And Herds: Rock Art Of The High Plains By Lawrence L. Loendorf, Linea Sundstrom 2010 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Book Review: Thunder And Herds: Rock Art Of The High Plains By Lawrence L. Loendorf, Linea Sundstrom

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

Archaeology is often described as detective work. In this detailed exploration of the High Plains of Colorado and New Mexico, archaeologist Lawrence Loendorf proves as adept as Sherlock Holmes in bringing diverse and often surprising clues to bear on understanding the who, when, where, and why of ancient rock carvings and paintings. From climate change to cultural migrations to landscape, Loendorf carefully reconstructs the contexts, cultural and physical, in which long-ago and not-so-long-ago American Indians created this complex array of images.

The twin joys of archaeology are discovery and the challenge of filling in missing pieces of history. The former ...


Book Review: The Politics Of Official Apologies By Melissa Nobles, Rebecca Tsosie 2010 Arizona State University

Book Review: The Politics Of Official Apologies By Melissa Nobles, Rebecca Tsosie

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

In recent years there has been an active dialogue on whether historic injustice has relevance in contemporary societies and, if so, whether an official “apology” accomplishes any beneficial purpose. Many scholars working on the topic of reparations have argued that an apology is largely irrelevant as a mere “symbolic act” unless accompanied by some material recognition of rights or transfer of resources that demonstrates a commitment to “repair” the injustice. This book, however, posits that the apology itself has value. Nobles proposes a “membership theory of apologies” that focuses on the ideological and moral value of apology rather than anticipated ...


Book Review: Ancient Nomads, Daniel J. Wescott 2010 Florida International University

Book Review: Ancient Nomads, Daniel J. Wescott

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

Ancient Nomads is the companion book to a Canadian Museum of Civilization exhibition comparing the cultures of nomadic peoples from the Russian and Canadian grasslands. Following an introduction, the “Grasslands” chapter describes the terrain, climate, vegetation, and wildlife in the Russian Steppes and the Canadian Great Plains. The authors then provide a brief archaeological history of both regions from approximately 35,000 to 5,000 years ago. The subsequent chapters provide an overview of various cultural aspects of nomads from the Steppes and the Plains: subsistence, food, transportation, housing, clothing, use of metal, spiritual life, and relationships with other nomadic ...


Seeing Through The Eyes Of Maximilian And Bodmer: Review Of The North American Journals Of Prince Maximilian Of Wied, Volume I: May 1832-April 1833. Edited By Stephen S. Witte And Marsha V. Gallagher., Clay S. Jenkinson 2010 Dakota Institute of the Lewis and Clark Fort Mandan Foundation

Seeing Through The Eyes Of Maximilian And Bodmer: Review Of The North American Journals Of Prince Maximilian Of Wied, Volume I: May 1832-April 1833. Edited By Stephen S. Witte And Marsha V. Gallagher., Clay S. Jenkinson

Great Plains Quarterly

The German prince Maximilian of WiedNeuwied (1782-1867) traveled up the Missouri River in 1832-33 to study American Indian culture before it was fatally compromised by the encroachment of Euro-American civilization. Aware of the expansionist and industrial dynamics of the Jacksonian Era in the United States, Maximilian wanted to study what he regarded as the vanishing Indian while there was still time. The idea had come to him during his 1815-17 journey through Brazil. For the publication that followed, Reise nach Brasilien in den Jahren 1815 his 1817 (1820), Maximilian had provided his own illustrations. These were criticized, including by his ...


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